VINCE HOLDING CORP., 10-K filed on 4/30/2021
Annual Report
v3.21.1
Document and Entity Information - USD ($)
$ in Millions
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Mar. 31, 2021
Aug. 01, 2020
Cover [Abstract]      
Document Type 10-K    
Amendment Flag false    
Document Period End Date Jan. 30, 2021    
Document Fiscal Year Focus 2020    
Document Fiscal Period Focus FY    
Trading Symbol VNCE    
Entity Registrant Name VINCE HOLDING CORP.    
Entity Central Index Key 0001579157    
Current Fiscal Year End Date --01-30    
Entity Well-known Seasoned Issuer No    
Entity Current Reporting Status Yes    
Entity Voluntary Filers No    
Entity Filer Category Non-accelerated Filer    
Entity Small Business true    
Entity Emerging Growth Company false    
Entity Shell Company false    
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding   11,812,800  
Entity Public Float     $ 14.3
Entity File Number 001-36212    
Entity Tax Identification Number 75-3264870    
Entity Address, Address Line One 500 5th Avenue    
Entity Address, Address Line Two 20th Floor    
Entity Address, City or Town New York    
Entity Address, State or Province NY    
Entity Address, Postal Zip Code 10110    
City Area Code 212    
Local Phone Number 944-2600    
Title of 12(b) Security Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share    
Security Exchange Name NYSE    
Document Annual Report true    
Document Transition Report false    
Entity Interactive Data Current Yes    
Entity Incorporation, State or Country Code DE    
ICFR Auditor Attestation Flag false    
Documents Incorporated by Reference [Text Block]

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in connection with the registrant’s 2021 annual meeting of stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

   
v3.21.1
Consolidated Balance Sheets - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Jan. 30, 2021
Feb. 01, 2020
Current assets:    
Cash and cash equivalents $ 3,777 $ 466
Trade receivables, net 31,878 40,660
Inventories, net 68,226 66,393
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 6,703 6,725
Total current assets 110,584 114,244
Property and equipment, net 17,741 25,274
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net 91,982 94,632
Intangible assets, net 76,491 81,533
Goodwill 31,973 41,435
Deferred income tax asset   102
Other assets 4,173 5,082
Total assets 332,944 362,302
Current liabilities:    
Accounts payable 40,216 43,075
Accrued salaries and employee benefits 4,231 9,620
Other accrued expenses 15,688 14,194
Short-term lease liabilities 22,085 20,638
Current portion of long-term debt   2,750
Total current liabilities 82,220 90,277
Long-term debt 84,485 48,680
Long-term lease liabilities 97,144 90,211
Deferred income tax liability 1,688  
Other liabilities 1,200 2,354
Commitments and contingencies (Note 6)
Stockholders' equity:    
Common stock at $0.01 par value (100,000,000 shares authorized, 11,809,023 and 11,680,593 shares issued and outstanding at January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, respectively) 118 117
Additional paid-in capital 1,138,247 1,137,147
Accumulated deficit (1,072,030) (1,006,381)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (128) (103)
Total stockholders' equity 66,207 130,780
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity $ 332,944 $ 362,302
v3.21.1
Consolidated Balance Sheets (Parenthetical) - $ / shares
Jan. 30, 2021
Feb. 01, 2020
Statement Of Financial Position [Abstract]    
Common stock, par value $ 0.01 $ 0.01
Common stock, shares authorized 100,000,000 100,000,000
Common stock, shares issued 11,809,023 11,680,593
Common stock, shares outstanding 11,809,023 11,680,593
v3.21.1
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Feb. 01, 2020
Income Statement [Abstract]    
Net sales $ 219,870 $ 375,187
Cost of products sold 131,273 196,757
Gross profit 88,597 178,430
Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets 13,848 19,491
Impairment of long-lived assets 13,026 818
Selling, general and administrative expenses 122,803 178,511
Loss from operations (61,080) (20,390)
Interest expense, net 5,007 4,958
Other income, net (2,304) (55,842)
(Loss) income before income taxes (63,783) 30,494
Provision for income taxes 1,866 98
Net (loss) income (65,649) 30,396
Other comprehensive (loss) income:    
Foreign currency translation adjustments (25) (20)
Comprehensive (loss) income $ (65,674) $ 30,376
Earnings (loss) per share:    
Basic (loss) earnings per share $ (5.58) $ 2.60
Diluted (loss) earnings per share $ (5.58) $ 2.55
Weighted average shares outstanding:    
Basic 11,769,689 11,665,541
Diluted 11,769,689 11,929,299
v3.21.1
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Total
Cumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, Adjustment [Member]
Common Stock [Member]
Additional Paid-In Capital [Member]
Accumulated Deficit [Member]
Accumulated Deficit [Member]
Cumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, Adjustment [Member]
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss [Member]
Beginning Balance at Feb. 02, 2019 $ 99,246   $ 116 $ 1,135,401 $ (1,036,188)   $ (83)
Beginning Balance, shares at Feb. 02, 2019     11,622,994        
Comprehensive income:              
Net income (loss) 30,396       30,396    
Foreign currency translation adjustments (20)           (20)
Cumulative effect of accounting change from adoption of ASU 2016-02 | ASU 2016-02 [Member]   $ (589)       $ (589)  
Share-based compensation expense 2,033     2,033      
Restricted stock unit vestings 1   $ 1        
Restricted stock unit vestings, shares     79,918        
Tax withholdings related to restricted stock vesting (321)     (321)      
Tax withholdings related to restricted stock vesting, shares     (24,509)        
Issuance of common stock related to Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("ESPP") 34     34      
Issuance of common stock related to Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("ESPP"), shares     2,190        
Ending Balance at Feb. 01, 2020 $ 130,780   $ 117 1,137,147 (1,006,381)   (103)
Ending Balance, shares at Feb. 01, 2020 11,680,593   11,680,593        
Comprehensive income:              
Net income (loss) $ (65,649)       (65,649)    
Foreign currency translation adjustments (25)           (25)
Share-based compensation expense 1,275     1,275      
Restricted stock unit vestings     $ 1 (1)      
Restricted stock unit vestings, shares     161,065        
Tax withholdings related to restricted stock vesting (222)     (222)      
Tax withholdings related to restricted stock vesting, shares     (41,659)        
Issuance of common stock related to Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("ESPP") 48     48      
Issuance of common stock related to Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("ESPP"), shares     9,024        
Ending Balance at Jan. 30, 2021 $ 66,207   $ 118 $ 1,138,247 $ (1,072,030)   $ (128)
Ending Balance, shares at Jan. 30, 2021 11,809,023   11,809,023        
v3.21.1
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
$ in Thousands
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
USD ($)
Feb. 01, 2020
USD ($)
Operating activities    
Net (loss) income $ (65,649) $ 30,396
Add (deduct) items not affecting operating cash flows:    
Adjustment to Tax Receivable Agreement Liability (2,320) (55,953)
Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets 13,848 19,491
Impairment of long-lived assets 13,026 818
Depreciation and amortization 6,898 9,602
Provision for bad debt 2,194 (51)
Loss on disposal of property and equipment   128
Amortization of deferred financing costs 674 554
Deferred income taxes 1,687 101
Share-based compensation expense 1,275 2,033
Capitalized PIK Interest 348  
Other, net   (304)
Changes in assets and liabilities:    
Receivables, net 6,594 (2,577)
Inventories (1,823) 5,252
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 533 2,942
Accounts payable and accrued expenses (6,563) 7,606
Other assets and liabilities 4,207 (3,219)
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities (25,071) 16,819
Investing activities    
Payments for capital expenditures (3,497) (4,523)
Net cash used in investing activities (3,497) (4,523)
Financing activities    
Proceeds from borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities 250,398 310,434
Repayment of borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities (237,722) (301,727)
Proceeds from borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities - Acquired Businesses   11,761
Repayment of borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities - Acquired Businesses   (29,410)
Repayment of borrowings under the Term Loan Facilities   (2,750)
Proceeds from borrowings under the Third Lien Credit Facility 20,000  
Tax withholdings related to restricted stock vesting (222) (321)
Proceeds from stock option exercises, restricted stock vesting, and issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase plan 48 35
Financing fees (715) (13)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities 31,787 (11,991)
Increase in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash 3,219 305
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash (7) (20)
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash, beginning of period 646 361
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period 3,858 646
Less: restricted cash at end of period 81 180
Cash and cash equivalents 3,777 466
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information    
Cash payments for interest 3,136 4,195
Cash payments for income taxes, net of refunds (113) (13)
Supplemental Disclosures of Non-Cash Investing and Financing Activities    
Capital expenditures in accounts payable and accrued liabilities 92 $ 494
Deferred financing fees in accrued liabilities and debt $ 650  
v3.21.1
Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Organization Consolidation And Presentation Of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Note 1. Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

On November 27, 2013, Vince Holding Corp. (“VHC” or the “Company”), previously known as Apparel Holding Corp., closed an initial public offering (“IPO”) of its common stock and completed a series of restructuring transactions (the “Restructuring Transactions”) through which Kellwood Holding, LLC acquired the non-Vince businesses, which included Kellwood Company, LLC (“Kellwood Company” or Kellwood”), from the Company. The Company continues to own and operate the Vince business, which includes Vince, LLC. References to “Vince”, “Rebecca Taylor” or “Parker” refer only to the referenced brand.

Prior to the IPO and the Restructuring Transactions, VHC was a diversified apparel company operating a broad portfolio of fashion brands, which included the Vince business. As a result of the IPO and Restructuring Transactions, the non-Vince businesses were separated from the Vince business, and the stockholders immediately prior to the consummation of the Restructuring Transactions (the “Pre-IPO Stockholders”) (through their ownership of Kellwood Holding, LLC) retained the full ownership and control of the non-Vince businesses. The Vince business is now the sole operating business of VHC.

On November 18, 2016, Kellwood Intermediate Holding, LLC and Kellwood Company, LLC entered into a Unit Purchase Agreement with Sino Acquisition, LLC (the “Kellwood Purchaser”) whereby the Kellwood Purchaser agreed to purchase all of the outstanding equity interests of Kellwood Company, LLC. Prior to the closing, Kellwood Intermediate Holding, LLC and Kellwood Company, LLC conducted a pre-closing reorganization pursuant to which certain assets of Kellwood Company, LLC were distributed to a newly formed subsidiary of Kellwood Intermediate Holding, LLC, St. Louis Transition, LLC (“St. Louis, LLC”). The transaction closed on December 21, 2016 (the “Kellwood Sale”).

On November 3, 2019, Vince, LLC, an indirectly wholly owned subsidiary of VHC, completed its acquisition (the “Acquisition”) of 100% of the equity interests of Rebecca Taylor, Inc. and Parker Holding, LLC (collectively, the “Acquired Businesses”) from Contemporary Lifestyle Group, LLC (“CLG”). The Acquired Businesses represented all of the operations of CLG. Because the Acquisition was a transaction between commonly controlled entities, generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) required the retrospective combination of the entities for all periods presented as if the combination had been in effect since the inception of common control. See Note 2 “Business Combinations” for further information.

(A) Description of Business: The Company is a global contemporary group, consisting of three brands: Vince, Rebecca Taylor, and Parker. Vince, established in 2002, is a leading global luxury apparel and accessories brand best known for creating elevated yet understated pieces for every day effortless style. Rebecca Taylor, founded in 1996 in New York City, is a contemporary womenswear line lauded for its signature prints, romantic detailing and vintage inspired aesthetic, reimagined for a modern era. Parker, founded in 2008 in New York City, is a contemporary women’s fashion brand that is trend focused. While we continue to believe that the Parker brand complements our portfolio, during the first half of fiscal 2020 the Company decided to pause the creation of new products to focus resources on the operations of the Vince and Rebecca Taylor brands and to preserve liquidity.

The Company reaches its customers through a variety of channels, specifically through major wholesale department stores and specialty stores in the United States (“U.S.”) and select international markets, as well as through the Company’s branded retail locations and the Company’s websites. The Company designs products in the U.S. and sources the vast majority of products from contract manufacturers outside the U.S., primarily in Asia. Products are manufactured to meet the Company’s product specifications and labor standards.

(B) Basis of Presentation: The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

The consolidated financial statements include the Company’s accounts and the accounts of the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiaries as of January 30, 2021. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. In the opinion of management, the financial statements contain all adjustments (consisting solely of normal recurring adjustments) and disclosures necessary for a fair statement.

(C) Fiscal Year: The Company operates on a fiscal calendar widely used by the retail industry that results in a given fiscal year consisting of a 52 or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31.

 

References to “fiscal year 2020” or “fiscal 2020” refer to the fiscal year ended January 30, 2021; and

 

References to “fiscal year 2019” or “fiscal 2019” refer to the fiscal year ended February 1, 2020.

Fiscal years 2020 and 2019 consisted of a 52-week period.

(D) Sources and Uses of Liquidity:  The Company’s sources of liquidity are cash and cash equivalents, cash flows from operations, if any, borrowings available under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility (as defined below) and the Company’s ability to access capital markets. The Company’s primary cash needs are funding working capital requirements, meeting debt service requirements and capital expenditures for new stores and related leasehold improvements.

(E) COVID-19: The spread of COVID-19, which was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020, caused state and municipal public officials to mandate jurisdiction-wide curfews, including “shelter-in-place” and closures of most non-essential businesses as well as other measures to mitigate the spread of the virus.

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have taken various measures to improve our liquidity as described below.  Based on these measures and our current expectations, we believe that our sources of liquidity will generate sufficient cash flows to meet our obligations during the next twelve months from the date these financial statements are issued.

The following summarizes the various measures we have implemented to effectively manage the business as well as the impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic during fiscal 2020.  

 

 

While we continued to serve our customers through our online e-commerce websites during the periods in which we were forced to shut down all of our domestic and international retail locations alongside other retailers, including our wholesale partners, the store closures resulted in a sharp decline in our revenue and ability to generate cash flows from operations.  We began reopening stores during May 2020 and nearly all of the Company’s stores have since reopened in a limited capacity in accordance with state and local regulations related to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Other than Hawaii and the UK which re-closed for a short period and subsequently re-opened based on the local stay-at-home order, we have not been impacted by any re-closure orders or regulations.

 

As a result of store closures and the decline in projected cash flows, the Company recognized a non-cash impairment charge related to property and equipment and operating lease right-of-use (“ROU”) assets to adjust the carrying amounts of certain store locations to their estimated fair value.  During fiscal 2020, the Company recorded an impairment of property and equipment and operating lease ROU assets of $4,470 and $8,556, respectively. The impairment charges are recorded within impairment of long-lived assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss). See “(K) Impairment of Long-lived Assets” below for additional information  

 

The Company incurred a non-cash impairment charge of $13,848 on goodwill and intangible assets during the year ended January 30, 2021 as a result of the decline in long-term projections due to COVID-19.  See Note 3 “Goodwill and Intangible Assets” for additional information;

 

We entered into a loan agreement with Sun Capital Partners, Inc. (“Sun Capital”), who own approximately 72% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock (see Note 14 “Related Party Transactions” for further discussion regarding our relationship with Sun Capital), as well as amendments to our 2018 Term Loan Facility and our 2018 Revolving Credit Facility to provide additional liquidity and amend certain financial covenants to allow increased operational flexibility. See Note 5 “Long-Term Debt and Financing Arrangements,” for additional information;

 

Furloughed all of our retail store associates as well as a significant portion of our corporate associates during the period of store closures and reinstated a limited number of associates commensurate to the store re-openings as well as other business needs;

 

Temporarily reduced retained employee salaries and suspended board retainer fees;

 

Engaged in active discussions with landlords to address the current operating environment, including amending existing lease terms. See Note 12 “Leases” for additional information;  

 

Executed other operational initiatives to carefully manage our investments across all key areas, including aligning inventory levels with anticipated demand and reevaluating non-critical capital build-out and other investments and activities; and

 

Streamlined our expense structure in all areas such as marketing, distribution, and product development to align with the business environment and sales opportunities.

The COVID-19 pandemic remains highly volatile and continues to evolve on a daily basis, which could negatively affect the outcome of the measures intended to address its impact and/or our current expectations of the Company’s future business performance.  Factors such as continued temporary closures and/or reclosures of our stores, distribution centers and corporate facilities as well as those of our wholesale partners; declines and changes in consumer behavior including traffic, spending and demand and resulting build-up of excess inventory; supply chain disruptions; and our business partners’ ability to access capital sources and maintain compliance with credit facilities; as well as our ability to collect receivables and diversion of corporate resources from key business activities and compliance efforts could continue to adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, cash flow, liquidity and results of operations.

(F) Use of Estimates: The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires that management make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements which affect revenues and expenses during the period reported. Estimates are adjusted when necessary to reflect actual experience. Significant estimates and assumptions may affect many items in the financial statements. Actual results could differ from estimates and assumptions in amounts that may be material to the consolidated financial statements.

The Company considered the COVID-19 related impacts to its estimates including the impairment of property and equipment and operating lease ROU assets, the impairment of goodwill and intangible assets, accounts receivable and inventory valuation, the liability associated with our tax receivable agreement, and the assessment of our liquidity. These estimates may change as the current situation evolves or new events occur.  

(G) Cash and cash equivalents:  All demand deposits and highly liquid short-term deposits with original maturities of three months or less are considered cash equivalents.

(H) Accounts Receivable and Concentration of Credit Risk: The Company maintains an allowance for accounts receivable estimated to be uncollectible. The provision for bad debts is included in Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expense. Substantially all of the Company’s trade receivables are derived from sales to retailers and are recorded at the invoiced amount and do not bear interest. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its wholesale partners’ financial condition and requires collateral as deemed necessary. The past due status of a receivable is based on its contractual terms. Account balances are charged off against the allowance when it is probable the receivable will not be collected.

Accounts receivable are recorded net of allowances including expected future chargebacks from wholesale partners and estimated margin support. It is the nature of the apparel and fashion industry that suppliers similar to the Company face significant pressure from customers in the retail industry to provide allowances to compensate for wholesale partner margin shortfalls. This pressure often takes the form of customers requiring the Company to provide price concessions on prior shipments as a prerequisite for obtaining future orders. Pressure for these concessions is largely determined by overall retail sales performance and, more specifically, the performance of the Company’s products at retail. To the extent the Company’s wholesale partners have more of the Company’s goods on hand at the end of the season, there will be greater pressure for the Company to grant markdown concessions on prior shipments. Accounts receivable balances are reported net of expected allowances for these matters based on the historical level of concessions required and estimates of the level of markdowns and allowances that will be required in the coming season. The Company evaluates the allowance balances on a continual basis and adjusts them as necessary to reflect changes in anticipated allowance activity. The Company also provides an allowance for sales returns based on known trends and historical return rates.

In fiscal 2020, sales to one wholesale partner accounted for more than ten percent of the Company’s net sales. These sales represented 21% of fiscal 2020 net sales. In fiscal 2019, sales to one wholesale partner accounted for more than ten percent of the Company’s net sales. These sales represented 22% of fiscal 2019 net sales.

Three wholesale partners each represented greater than ten percent of the Company’s gross accounts receivable balance as of January 30, 2021, with a corresponding aggregate total of 67% of such balance. Three wholesale partners each represented greater than ten percent of the Company’s gross accounts receivable balance as of February 1, 2020, with a corresponding aggregate total of 60% of such balance.

(I) Inventories: Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined on the first-in, first-out basis. The cost of inventory includes purchase cost as well as sourcing, transportation, duty, and other processing costs associated with acquiring, importing, and preparing inventory for sale. Inventory costs are included in cost of products sold at the time of their sale. Product development costs are expensed in SG&A expense when incurred. Inventory values are reduced to net realizable value when there are factors indicating that certain inventories will not be sold on terms sufficient to recover their cost. Inventories consisted of finished goods. As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020 finished goods, net of reserves were $68,226 and $66,393, respectively.

The Company has two major suppliers that accounted for approximately 43% of inventory purchases for fiscal 2020. Amounts due to these suppliers was $2,096 included in Accounts payable in the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 30, 2021. The Company had two major suppliers that accounted for approximately 34% of inventory purchases for fiscal 2019. Amounts due to these suppliers was $3,173 included in Accounts payable in the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of February 1, 2020.

(J) Property and Equipment: Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is computed on the straight-line method over estimated useful lives of three to ten years for furniture, fixtures, and equipment. Leasehold improvements are depreciated on the straight-line basis over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the lease term, excluding renewal terms. Capitalized software is depreciated on the straight-line basis over the estimated economic useful life of the software, generally three to seven years. Maintenance and repair costs are charged to earnings while expenditures for major renewals and improvements are capitalized. Upon the disposition of property and equipment, the accumulated depreciation is deducted from the original cost and any gain or loss is reflected in current earnings. Property and equipment consisted of the following:

 

 

 

January 30,

 

 

February 1,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Leasehold improvements

 

$

41,155

 

 

$

43,075

 

Furniture, fixtures and equipment

 

 

14,596

 

 

 

14,565

 

Capitalized software

 

 

12,516

 

 

 

12,516

 

Construction in process

 

 

1,240

 

 

 

905

 

Total property and equipment

 

 

69,507

 

 

 

71,061

 

Less: accumulated depreciation

 

 

(51,766

)

 

 

(45,787

)

Property and equipment, net

 

$

17,741

 

 

$

25,274

 

 

Depreciation expense was $5,979 and $7,886 for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, respectively.

(K) Impairment of Long-lived Assets:  The Company reviews long-lived assets which consist of property and equipment, operating lease assets and intangible assets with a finite life for impairment when the existence of facts and circumstances indicate that the useful life is shorter than previously estimated or that the carrying amount of the asset groups to which these assets relate may not be recoverable. The asset group is defined as the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are available and largely independent of the cash flows of other groups of assets, which for our retail stores is at the store level. Recoverability of these assets is evaluated by comparing the carrying value of the asset group with its estimated future undiscounted cash flows. The recoverability assessment is dependent on a number of factors, including estimates of future growth and profitability, as well as other variables. If the comparisons indicate that the value of the asset is not recoverable, an impairment loss is calculated as the difference between the carrying value and the fair value of the assets within the asset group and the loss is recognized during that period. The fair value of the operating lease right-of-use assets is determined from the perspective of a market participant considering various factors. The judgments and assumptions used in determining the fair value of the operating lease right-of-use assets were the current comparable market rents for similar properties and a store discount rate. The fair value of the property and equipment was based on its estimated liquidation value.  The estimates regarding recoverability and fair value can be affected by factors such as future store results, real estate demand, store closure plans, and economic conditions that can be difficult to predict.

During fiscal 2020, the Company recorded non-cash asset impairment charges of $13,026, within Impairment of long-lived assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss), related to the impairment of certain retail stores as the carrying values were determined not to be recoverable. The impairment charges consisted of $4,470 related to property and equipment and $8,556 related to operating lease right-of-use assets. The carrying amounts of these assets were adjusted to their estimated fair values.

During fiscal 2019, the Company recorded non-cash asset impairment charges of $818 within Impairment of long-lived assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss), related to the impairment of certain retail stores as the carrying values were determined not to be recoverable. The impairment charge consisted of $641 related to property and equipment and $177 related to operating lease right-of-use assets. The carrying amounts of these assets were adjusted to their estimated fair values. Additionally, during the second quarter of fiscal 2019, the Company identified facts and circumstances that indicated that the net book value of finite-lived intangible assets associated with Rebecca Taylor and Parker may not be recoverable, resulting in the determination that a triggering event had occurred. The Company recorded a non-cash asset impairment charge of $6,115 related to the Rebecca Taylor and Parker customer relationships within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss), as the Company had determined that the fair value of these customer relationships was $0. Significant assumptions utilized in these analyses included projected revenue growth rates and discount rates.

(L) Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets: Goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets are tested for impairment at least annually and in an interim period if a triggering event occurs. As discussed in further detail below, we determined that a triggering event occurred during the first quarter of fiscal 2020 and during the second quarter of fiscal 2019.

Goodwill is not allocated to the Company’s operating segments in the measure of segment assets regularly reported to and used by management, however goodwill is allocated to operating segments (goodwill reporting units) for the purpose of the annual impairment test for goodwill.

Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of acquired businesses over the fair market value of the identifiable net assets. The indefinite-lived intangible assets are the Vince tradename and the Rebecca Taylor tradename.

An entity may elect to perform a qualitative impairment assessment for goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets. If adverse qualitative trends are identified during the qualitative assessment that indicate that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit or indefinite-lived intangible asset is less than its carrying amount, a quantitative impairment test is required. “Step one” of the quantitative impairment test for goodwill requires an entity to determine the fair value of each reporting unit and compare such fair value to the respective carrying amount. If the estimated fair value of the reporting unit exceeds the carrying value of the net assets assigned to that reporting unit, goodwill is not impaired, and the Company is not required to perform further testing. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds its estimated fair value, an impairment loss is recorded for the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. The goodwill impairment test is dependent on a number of factors, including estimates of projected revenues, EBITDA margins, long-term growth rates, working capital, discount rates and other variables. The Company bases its estimates on assumptions it believes to be reasonable, but which are unpredictable and inherently uncertain. Actual future results may differ from those estimates.  

The Company estimates the fair value of the tradename intangible assets using a discounted cash flow valuation analysis, which is based on the “relief from royalty” methodology. This methodology assumes that in lieu of ownership, a third party would be willing to pay a royalty in order to exploit the related benefits of these types of assets. The relief from royalty approach is dependent on a number of factors, including estimates of projected revenues, royalty rates in the category of intellectual property, discount rates and other variables.  The Company bases its fair value estimates on assumptions it believes to be reasonable, but which are unpredictable and inherently uncertain. Actual future results may differ from those estimates. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the estimated fair value of the tradename intangible asset is less than the carrying value.

An entity may pass on performing the qualitative assessment for a reporting unit or indefinite-lived intangible asset and directly perform the quantitative assessment. This determination can be made on an asset by asset basis, and an entity may resume performing a qualitative assessment in subsequent periods.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2020, the Company determined that a triggering event had occurred as a result of changes to the Company’s long-term projections driven by the impacts of COVID-19. The change in performance was primarily driven by the shutdown of the wholesale partners’ retail locations domestically and internationally, resulting in reduced orders, decreased revenue and lower current and expected future cash flow. The Company performed an interim quantitative impairment assessment of goodwill and intangible assets.

A quantitative impairment test on the goodwill allocated to the Vince Wholesale reporting unit determined that the fair value was below the carrying value. The Company estimated the fair value using a combination of discounted cash flows and market comparisons. “Step one” of the assessment determined that the fair value was below the carrying amount by $9,462, and as a result the Company recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $9,462 within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) in fiscal 2020.

The Company estimated the fair value of the Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradename indefinite-lived intangible assets using a discounted cash flow valuation analysis which is based on the relief from royalty method and determined that the fair value of the Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradenames were below their carrying amounts. Accordingly, the Company recorded an impairment charge for the Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradename indefinite-lived intangible assets of $4,386, which was recorded within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for fiscal 2020.

During the second quarter of fiscal 2019, the Company identified facts and circumstances that indicated that the fair value of goodwill associated with Rebecca Taylor and Parker, the Rebecca Taylor tradename and the Parker tradename may not be recoverable, resulting in the determination that a triggering event had occurred. Because of decreases in projected revenues and declines in margins due to increases of aged inventory related to the Rebecca Taylor and Parker brands that were considered other than temporary, the Company performed a quantitative assessment on goodwill and these indefinite-lived intangible assets.

The Company estimated the fair value of the Rebecca Taylor and Parker tradename intangible assets using the relief from royalty methodology and determined that the fair value of the Rebecca Taylor and Parker tradenames were below their carrying amounts. Accordingly, the Company recorded an impairment charge for the Rebecca Taylor and Parker tradename intangible assets of $11,247, which was recorded within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) in fiscal 2019. A quantitative impairment test on the goodwill allocated to the Rebecca Taylor and Parker reporting unit determined that the fair value was below the carrying value. The Company estimated the fair value using the income valuation approach. “Step one” of the assessment determined that the fair value was below the carrying amount by $2,129, and as a result the Company recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $2,129 within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) in fiscal 2019.

Determining the fair value of goodwill and other intangible assets is judgmental in nature and requires the use of significant estimates and assumptions, including projected revenues, EBITDA margins, long-term growth rates, working capital, royalty rates in the category of intellectual property, discount rates and future market conditions, among others. It is possible that estimates of future operating results could change adversely and impact the evaluation of the recoverability of the carrying value of goodwill and intangible assets and that the effect of such changes could be material.

In accordance with Accounting Standards Codification Topic 350, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (“ASC 350”), indefinite-lived intangibles should be reassessed each reporting period to determine whether events or circumstances continue to support an indefinite life. Based on the factors that led to the recognition of the Parker tradename impairment charge, the Company determined that the indefinite life classification was no longer appropriate for the Parker tradename. Accordingly, the Company determined a 10-year useful life was more appropriate and began amortizing the Parker tradename as of the beginning of the third quarter of fiscal 2019. The remaining definite-lived intangible assets are comprised of Vince customer relationships and are being amortized on a straight-line basis over their useful lives of 20 years.

In both fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, the Company performed its annual impairment test during the fourth quarter. In fiscal 2020, the Company elected to perform a quantitative impairment test on goodwill allocated to the Company’s Vince Wholesale reporting unit. The results of the quantitative test did not result in any impairment because the fair value of the Company’s Vince Wholesale reporting unit exceeded its carrying value. In fiscal 2019, the Company elected to perform a qualitative impairment test on goodwill allocated to the Company’s Vince Wholesale reporting unit and concluded that it was more likely than not that the fair value of the Company’s Vince Wholesale reporting unit exceeded its carrying value and was not impaired. Goodwill was $31,973 and $41,435 as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, respectively.

In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020, the Company also elected to perform a quantitative impairment test on its Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradename intangible assets. The results of the quantitative test did not result in any impairment because the fair value of the Company’s Vince tradename and Rebecca Taylor tradename intangible assets exceeded their carrying values. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019, the Company elected to perform a qualitative impairment test on its Vince tradename intangible asset and concluded that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the Company’s Vince tradename intangible assets exceeds its carrying value and the Vince tradename intangible asset was not impaired. There was no additional impairment as part of the annual impairment test in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019 for the Rebecca Taylor tradename. Indefinite-lived tradename intangible assets were $71,800 and $76,186 as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020 respectively, which is included within Intangible assets, net in our Consolidated Balance Sheets.

See Note 3 “Goodwill and Intangible Assets” for more information on the details surrounding goodwill and intangible assets.

(M) Deferred Financing Costs: Deferred financing costs, such as underwriting, financial advisory, professional fees, and other similar fees are capitalized and recognized in interest expense over the contractual life of the related debt instrument using the straight-line method, as this method results in recognition of interest expense that is materially consistent with that of the effective interest method.

(N) Leases: The Company determines if a contract contains a lease at inception. The Company leases various office spaces, showrooms and retail stores. Although the Company’s more recent leases are subject to shorter terms as a result of the implementation of the strategy to pursue shorter lease terms, many of the Company’s leases have initial terms of 10 years, and in many instances can be extended for an additional term. The Company will not include renewal options in the underlying lease term unless the Company is reasonably certain to exercise the renewal option. Substantially all of the Company’s leases require a fixed annual rent, and most require the payment of additional rent if store sales exceed a negotiated amount. These percentage rent expenses are considered as variable lease costs and are recognized in the consolidated financial statements when incurred. In addition, the Company’s real estate leases may also require additional payments for real estate taxes and other occupancy-related costs which it considers as non-lease components.

Operating lease ROU assets and operating lease liabilities are recognized based upon the present value of the future lease payments over the lease term. As the Company’s leases do not provide an implicit borrowing rate, the Company uses an estimated incremental borrowing rate based upon a combination of market-based factors, such as market quoted forward yield curves and company specific factors, such as the Company’s credit rating, lease size and duration to calculate the present value.

(O) Revenue Recognition:  The Company recognizes revenue when performance obligations identified under the terms of contracts with its customers are satisfied, which generally occurs upon the transfer of control in accordance with the contractual terms and conditions of the sale. Sales are recognized when the control of the goods are transferred to the customer for the Company’s wholesale business, upon receipt by the customer for the Company’s e-commerce business, and at the time of sale to the consumer for the Company’s retail business. See Note 13 “Segment Information” for disaggregated revenue amounts by segment.

Revenue associated with gift cards is recognized upon redemption and unredeemed balances are considered a contract liability and recorded within other accrued expenses, which are subject to escheatment within the jurisdictions in which it operates. As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the contract liability was $1,618 and $1,585, respectively. In fiscal 2020, the Company recognized $232 of revenue that was previously included in the contract liability as of February 1, 2020.

Amounts billed to customers for shipping and handling costs are not material.  Such shipping and handling costs are accounted for as a fulfillment cost and are included in cost of products sold. Sales taxes that are collected by the Company from a customer are excluded from revenue.    

Sales are measured as the amount of consideration the Company expects to receive in exchange for transferring goods, which includes estimates for variable consideration. Variable consideration mainly includes discounts, chargebacks, markdown allowances, cooperative advertising programs, and sales returns. Estimated amounts of discounts, chargebacks, markdown allowances, cooperative advertising programs, and sales returns are accounted for as reductions of sales when the associated sale occurs. These estimated amounts are adjusted periodically based on changes in facts and circumstances when the changes become known. On the Company’s consolidated balance sheet, reserves for sales returns are included within other accrued liabilities, and the value of inventory associated with reserves for sales returns are included in prepaid expenses and other current assets. The Company continues to estimate the amount of sales returns based on known trends and historical return rates.  

(P) Cost of Products Sold: The Company’s cost of products sold and gross margins may not necessarily be comparable to that of other entities as a result of different practices in categorizing costs. The primary components of the Company’s cost of products sold are as follows:

 

the cost of purchased merchandise, including raw materials;

 

the cost of inbound transportation, including freight;

 

the cost of the Company’s production and sourcing departments;

 

other processing costs associated with acquiring and preparing the inventory for sale; and

 

shrink and valuation reserves.

(Q) Marketing and Advertising: The Company provides cooperative advertising allowances to certain of its customers. These allowances are accounted for as reductions in sales as discussed in “Revenue Recognition” above. Production expense related to company-directed advertising is deferred until the first time at which the advertisement runs. All other expenses related to company-directed advertising are expensed as incurred. Marketing and advertising expense recorded in SG&A expenses was $11,851 and $17,581 in fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, respectively. At January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, deferred production expenses associated with company-directed advertising were $447 and $749, respectively.

(R) Share-Based Compensation: New, modified and unvested share-based payment transactions with employees, such as stock options and restricted stock units, are measured at fair value and recognized as compensation expense over the requisite service period and is included as a component of SG&A expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss). Additionally, share-based awards granted to non-employees are expensed over the period in which the related services are rendered at their fair value, using the Black Scholes Pricing Model to determine fair value. Forfeitures are accounted for as they occur.  

(S) Income Taxes: The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences of temporary differences between the carrying amounts and tax bases of assets and liabilities at enacted rates. The Company assesses the likelihood of the realization of deferred tax assets and adjusts the carrying amount of these deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance to the extent the Company believes it more likely than not that all or a portion of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Many factors are considered when assessing the likelihood of future realization of deferred tax assets, including recent earnings results within taxing jurisdictions, expectations of future taxable income, the carryforward periods available and other relevant factors. Changes in the required valuation allowance are recorded in income in the period such determination is made. The Company recognizes tax positions in the Consolidated Balance Sheets as the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement with tax authorities assuming full knowledge of the position and all relevant facts. Accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits are included in income taxes in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss).

(T) Earnings Per Share: Basic earnings (loss) per share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Except when the effect would be anti-dilutive, diluted earnings per share is calculated based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding plus the dilutive effect of share-based awards calculated under the treasury stock method.

(U) Recent Accounting Pronouncements: Except as noted below, the Company has considered all recent accounting pronouncements and has concluded that there are no recent accounting pronouncements that may have a material impact on its Consolidated Financial Statements, based on current information.

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board's (“FASB”) issued ASU 2018-15: “Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract”. The ASU is intended to align the requirements for capitalization of implementation costs incurred in a cloud computing arrangement that is a service contract with the existing guidance for internal-use software. This guidance is effective for fiscal years and interim periods within those years beginning after December 15, 2019. The guidance provides flexibility in adoption, allowing for either retrospective adjustment or prospective adjustment for all implementation costs incurred after the date of adoption. The Company adopted the guidance on February 2, 2020, the first day of fiscal 2020, which did not have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13: "Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments". The ASU requires an impairment model (known as the current expected credit loss ("CECL") model) that is based on expected losses rather than incurred losses. Under the new guidance, each reporting entity should estimate an allowance for expected credit losses, which is intended to result in more timely recognition of losses. The new standard applies to trade receivables arising from revenue transactions. Under ASC 606, revenue is recognized when, among other criteria, it is probable that an entity will collect the consideration it is entitled to when goods or services are transferred to a customer. When trade receivables are recorded, they become subject to the CECL model and estimates of expected credit losses on trade receivables over their contractual life will be required to be recorded at inception based on historical information, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. This guidance is effective for smaller reporting companies for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2022, including the interim periods in the year. Early adoption is permitted.  Management is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU on the consolidated financial statements.

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12: “Income Taxes (ASC 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes.” The guidance simplifies the approach for intraperiod tax allocations, the methodology for calculating income taxes in an interim period, and the recognition of deferred tax liabilities for outside basis differences. The guidance also clarifies and simplifies other areas of ASC 740. This ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. Management is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU on the consolidated financial statements, however the Company does not expect that the adoption of this ASU will have a material impact on the Consolidated financial statements.

(V) Revision: The Company identified an error in the consolidated statement of cash flows for the year ended February 1, 2020 related to the presentation of proceeds and repayments of borrowings under revolving credit facilities within financing activities. The Company has historically presented proceeds and repayments from borrowings under revolving credit facilities as net in the financing section of the statement of cash flows because of the continuous activity of proceeds and repayments of borrowings. Given the contractual maturity of the revolver is greater than three months, the Company concluded that gross presentation was appropriate and has revised the historical financial statements. These adjustments were not considered to be material individually or in the aggregate to the previously issued financial statements. However, because of the significance of these adjustments, the Company has revised its consolidated statement of cash flows for the year ended February 1, 2020. This revision had no impact on the consolidated balance sheets, consolidated statements of operations or consolidated statements of comprehensive income (loss) for the periods nor did it have an impact on total cash flows from operating, investing or financing activities.

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

 

February 1, 2020

 

(in thousands)

 

As Previously Reported

 

 

Adjustment

 

 

As Revised

 

Financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities

 

$

 

 

$

310,434

 

 

$

310,434

 

Repayment of borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

(301,727

)

 

 

(301,727

)

Net proceeds from borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities

 

 

8,707

 

 

 

(8,707

)

 

 

 

Proceeds from borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities - Acquired Businesses

 

 

 

 

 

11,761

 

 

 

11,761

 

Repayment of borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities- Acquired Businesses

 

 

 

 

 

(29,410

)

 

 

(29,410

)

Net proceeds (repayment) from borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facilities - Acquired Businesses

 

 

(17,649

)

 

 

17,649

 

 

 

 

Net cash (used in)/provided by financing activities

 

$

(11,991

)

 

$

 

 

$

(11,991

)

 

v3.21.1
Business Combinations
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Business Combinations [Abstract]  
Business Combinations

Note 2. Business Combinations

On November 4, 2019, Vince, LLC entered into an Equity Purchase Agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”) with CLG, providing for the Acquisition by Vince, LLC of 100% of the equity interests of the Acquired Businesses from CLG. The Acquisition was consummated effective on November 3, 2019.

The aggregate purchase price for the Acquisition was $19,730, which amount was used to satisfy all outstanding obligations under the credit facility of the Acquired Businesses and for the payment of certain compensation expenses. The purchase price was paid in cash and funded under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility which was upsized simultaneously with the Acquisition, as described in Note 5 “Long-Term Debt and Financing Arrangements”.

CLG is owned by affiliates of Sun Capital Partners, Inc. (collectively, “Sun Capital”).  Sun Capital beneficially owns approximately 72% of the Company’s common stock.  The Acquisition was reviewed and approved by the Special Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors, consisting solely of directors not affiliated with Sun Capital, who was represented by independent financial and legal advisors.

The Acquisition was treated for accounting purposes as a transaction by entities under common control within the scope of ASC Topic 805, “Business Combinations”. This guidance required the retrospective combination of the entities for all periods presented as if the combination had been in effect since inception of common control. Additionally, the combination of the entities reflected the historical balance sheet data for the Acquired Businesses.

During fiscal 2019, the Company incurred $3,571 of transaction and other related costs related to the Acquisition, which have been expensed and are included in SG&A expense in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss).

v3.21.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Goodwill And Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]  
Goodwill and Intangible Assets

Note 3. Goodwill and Intangible Assets

Net goodwill balances and changes therein by segment were as follows:

 

(in thousands)

 

Vince Wholesale

 

 

Vince

Direct-to-consumer

 

 

Rebecca Taylor and Parker

 

 

Total Net Goodwill

 

Balance as of February 1, 2020

 

$

41,435

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

41,435

 

Impairment charges

 

 

(9,462

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(9,462

)

Balance as of January 30, 2021

 

$

31,973

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

31,973

 

The total carrying amount of goodwill was net of accumulated impairments of $101,845 and $92,383 as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, respectively.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2020, the Company determined that a triggering event had occurred as a result of changes to the Company’s long-term projections driven by the impacts of COVID-19. The Company performed an interim quantitative impairment assessment of goodwill and intangible assets.

The Company determined the fair value of the Vince wholesale reportable segment using a combination of discounted cash flows and market comparisons. “Step one” of the assessment determined that the fair value was below the carrying amount by $9,462, and as a result the Company recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $9,462 within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for fiscal 2020.

During the second quarter of fiscal 2019, the Company identified facts and circumstances that indicated that the fair value of goodwill associated with Rebecca Taylor and Parker may not be recoverable, resulting in the determination that a triggering event had occurred. As a result, the Company recorded a $2,129 goodwill impairment charge in the Rebecca Taylor and Parker reporting unit.

There were no impairments recorded as a result of the Company’s annual goodwill impairment test performed during fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019.

The following tables present a summary of identifiable intangible assets:

 

(in thousands)

 

Gross Amount

 

 

Accumulated Amortization

 

 

Accumulated Impairments

 

 

Net Book Value

 

Balance as of January 30, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amortizable intangible assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customer relationships

 

$

31,355

 

 

$

(21,036

)

 

$

(6,115

)

 

$

4,204

 

Tradenames

 

 

13,100

 

 

 

(86

)

 

 

(12,527

)

 

 

487

 

Indefinite-lived intangible assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tradenames

 

 

110,986

 

 

 

 

 

 

(39,186

)

 

 

71,800

 

Total intangible assets

 

$

155,441

 

 

$

(21,122

)

 

$

(57,828

)

 

$

76,491

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Gross Amount

 

 

Accumulated Amortization

 

 

Accumulated Impairments

 

 

Net Book Value

 

Balance as of February 1, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amortizable intangible assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customer relationships

 

$

31,355

 

 

$

(20,437

)

 

$

(6,115

)

 

$

4,803

 

Tradenames

 

 

13,100

 

 

 

(29

)

 

 

(12,527

)

 

 

544

 

Indefinite-lived intangible assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tradenames

 

 

110,986

 

 

 

 

 

 

(34,800

)

 

 

76,186

 

Total intangible assets

 

$

155,441

 

 

$

(20,466

)

 

$

(53,442

)

 

$

81,533

 

 

During the first quarter of fiscal 2020, the Company estimated the fair value of the Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradename indefinite-lived intangible assets using a discounted cash flow valuation analysis, which is based on the relief from royalty method and determined that the fair value of the Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradenames were below their carrying amounts. Accordingly, the Company recorded an impairment charge for the Vince and Rebecca Taylor tradename indefinite-lived intangible assets of $4,386, which was recorded within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for fiscal 2020.

During the second quarter of fiscal 2019, the Company identified facts and circumstances that indicated that the fair value of the Rebecca Taylor tradename, the Parker tradename and Rebecca Taylor and Parker customer relationships may not be recoverable, resulting in the determination that a triggering event had occurred. As a result of comparing the fair value of these assets to their respective carrying values, the Company recorded an $11,247 impairment charge associated with the Rebecca Taylor and Parker tradename intangible assets and $6,115 of impairment charges for the Rebecca Taylor and Parker customer relationships within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for fiscal 2019.

No impairments of the Company’s indefinite lived tradenames were recorded as a result of the Company’s annual asset impairment tests performed during fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019.

In accordance with ASC 350, indefinite-lived intangibles should be reassessed each reporting period to determine whether events or circumstances continue to support an indefinite life. Based on the impairment charge calculated, the Company determined that the indefinite life classification was no longer appropriate for the Parker tradename. Accordingly, the Company determined a 10-year useful life was more appropriate and began amortizing the Parker tradename beginning in the third quarter of fiscal 2019.

Amortization of identifiable intangible assets was $656 and $1,596 for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, respectively, which is included in SG&A expenses on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss). Amortization expense for each of the fiscal years 2021 to 2025 is expected to be as follows:

 

 

 

Future

 

(in thousands)

 

Amortization

 

2021

 

$

655

 

2022

 

 

655

 

2023

 

 

655

 

2024

 

 

655

 

2025

 

 

655

 

Total next 5 fiscal years

 

$

3,275

 

 

v3.21.1
Fair Value Measurements
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Fair Value Disclosures [Abstract]  
Fair Value Measurements

Note 4. Fair Value Measurements

We define the fair value of a financial instrument as the amount that would be received from the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.  We are responsible for the determination of the value of the investments carried at fair value and the supporting methodologies and assumptions.  The Company’s financial assets and liabilities are to be measured using inputs from three levels of the fair value hierarchy as follows:

 

 

Level 1—

 

quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities

 

 

 

 

Level 2—

 

observable market-based inputs (quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets and quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active) or inputs that are corroborated by observable market data

 

 

 

 

Level 3—

 

significant unobservable inputs that reflect the Company’s assumptions and are not substantially supported by market data

 

The Company did not have any non-financial assets or non-financial liabilities recognized at fair value on a recurring basis at January 30, 2021 or February 1, 2020. At January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the Company believes that the carrying values of cash and cash equivalents, receivables, and accounts payable approximate fair value, due to the short-term maturity of these instruments. The Company’s debt obligations with a carrying value of $85,897 as of January 30, 2021 are at variable interest rates. Borrowings under the Company’s 2018 Revolving Credit Facility are recorded at carrying value, which approximates fair value due to the frequency nature of such borrowings and repayments. The Company considers this as a Level 2 input. The fair value of the Company’s 2018 Term Loan Facility and the Third Lien Credit Facility was approximately $25,000 and $21,000, respectively, as of January 30, 2021, based upon estimated market value calculations that factor principal, time to maturity, interest rate, and current cost of debt. The Company considers this a Level 3 input.

The Company’s non-financial assets, which primarily consist of goodwill, intangible assets, ROU lease assets, and property and equipment, are not required to be measured at fair value on a recurring basis and are reported at their carrying values. However, on a periodic basis whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be fully recoverable (and at least annually for goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets), non-financial assets are assessed for impairment, and if applicable, written down to (and recorded at) fair value.

Determining the fair value of goodwill and other intangible assets is judgmental in nature and requires the use of significant estimates and assumptions, including projected revenues, EBITDA margins growth rates and operating margins, long-term growth rates, working capital, royalty rates in the category of intellectual property, discount rates and future market conditions, among others, as applicable. The inputs used in determining the fair value of the ROU lease assets were the current comparable market rents for similar properties and a store discount rate. The fair value of the property and equipment was based on its estimated liquidation value.  The measurement of fair value of these assets are considered Level 3 valuations as certain of these inputs are unobservable and are estimated to be those that would be used by market participants in valuing these or similar assets.

The following tables present the non-financial assets the Company measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis in fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, based on such fair value hierarchy:

 

 

 

Net Carrying

Value as of

 

 

Fair Value Measured and Recorded at Reporting Date Using:

 

 

Total Losses - Year Ended

 

 

(in thousands)

 

January 30, 2021

 

 

Level 1

 

 

Level 2

 

 

Level 3

 

 

January 30, 2021

 

 

Property and equipment

 

$

8,922

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

8,922

 

 

$

4,470

 

(1)

Goodwill

 

 

31,973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31,973

 

 

 

9,462

 

(2)

Tradenames - Indefinite-lived

 

 

71,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

71,800

 

 

 

4,386

 

(2)

ROU Assets

 

 

76,101

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

76,101

 

 

 

8,556

 

(1)

 

 

 

Net Carrying

Value as of

 

 

Fair Value Measured and Recorded at Reporting Date Using:

 

 

Total Losses - Year Ended

 

 

(in thousands)

 

February 1, 2020

 

 

Level 1

 

 

Level 2

 

 

Level 3

 

 

February 1, 2020

 

 

Property and equipment

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

641

 

(1)

Goodwill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,129

 

(2)

Tradenames - Indefinite-lived

 

 

5,086

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,086

 

 

 

3,550

 

(2)

Tradenames - Definite-lived

 

 

544

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

544

 

 

 

7,697

 

(2)

Customer Lists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,115

 

(2)

ROU Assets

 

 

788

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

788

 

 

 

177

 

(1)

 

(1) Recorded within Impairment of long-lived assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss). See Note 1 “Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (K) Impairment of Long-lived Assets” for additional information.

(2) Recorded within Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss). See Note 1 “Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (K) Impairment of Long-lived Assets and (L) Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets” for additional information.

v3.21.1
Long-Term Debt and Financing Arrangements
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Debt Disclosure [Abstract]  
Long-Term Debt and Financing Arrangements

Note 5. Long-Term Debt and Financing Arrangements

Debt obligations consisted of the following:

 

 

 

January 30,

 

 

February 1,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Long-term debt:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term Loan Facilities

 

$

24,750

 

 

$

24,750

 

Revolving Credit Facilities

 

 

40,399

 

 

 

27,723

 

Third Lien Credit Facility

 

 

20,748

 

 

 

 

Total debt principal

 

 

85,897

 

 

 

52,473

 

Less: current portion of long-term debt

 

 

 

 

 

2,750

 

Less: deferred financing costs

 

 

1,412

 

 

 

1,043

 

Total long-term debt

 

$

84,485

 

 

$

48,680

 

 

2018 Term Loan Facility

 

On August 21, 2018, Vince, LLC entered into a $27,500 senior secured term loan facility (the “2018 Term Loan Facility”) pursuant to a credit agreement by and among Vince, LLC, as the borrower, VHC and Vince Intermediate Holdings, LLC, a direct subsidiary of VHC and the direct parent company of Vince, LLC (“Vince Intermediate”), as guarantors, Crystal Financial, LLC, as administrative agent and collateral agent, and the other lenders from time to time party thereto. The 2018 Term Loan Facility is subject to quarterly amortization of principal equal to 2.5% of the original aggregate principal amount of the 2018 Term Loan Facility, with the balance payable at final maturity. Interest is payable on loans under the 2018 Term Loan Facility at a rate equal to the 90-day LIBOR rate (subject to a 0% floor) plus applicable margins subject to a pricing grid based on a minimum Consolidated EBITDA (as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Term Loan Facility) calculation. During the continuance of certain specified events of default, interest will accrue on the outstanding amount of any loan at a rate of 2.0% in excess of the rate otherwise applicable to such amount. The 2018 Term Loan Facility matures on the earlier of August 21, 2023 and the maturity date of the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility (as defined below).

The 2018 Term Loan Facility contains a requirement that Vince, LLC maintain a Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio (as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Term Loan Facility) as of the last day of any period of four fiscal quarters not to exceed 0.85:1.00 for the fiscal quarter ended November 3, 2018, 1.00:1.00 for the fiscal quarter ended February 2, 2019, 1.20:1.00 for the fiscal quarter ended May 4, 2019, 1.35:1.00 for the fiscal quarter ending August 3, 2019, 1.50:1.00 for the fiscal quarters ending November 2, 2019 and February 1, 2020 and 1.75:1.00 for the fiscal quarter ending May 2, 2020 and each fiscal quarter thereafter. In addition, the 2018 Term Loan Facility contains customary representations and warranties, other covenants, and events of default, including but not limited to, covenants with respect to limitations on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, liens, burdensome agreements, guarantees, investments, loans, asset sales, mergers, acquisitions, prepayment of other debt, the repurchase of capital stock, transactions with affiliates, and the ability to change the nature of the Company’s business or its fiscal year, and distributions and dividends. The 2018 Term Loan Facility generally permits dividends to the extent that no default or event of default is continuing or would result from a contemplated dividend, so long as (i) after giving pro forma effect to the contemplated dividend and for the following six months Excess Availability will be at least the greater of 20.0% of the Loan Cap (as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Term Loan Facility) and $10,000, (ii) after giving pro forma effect to the contemplated dividend, the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio for the 12 months preceding such dividend will be greater than or equal to 1.0 to 1.0 (provided that the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio may be less than 1.0 to 1.0 if, after giving pro forma effect to the contemplated dividend, Excess Availability for the six fiscal months following the dividend is at least the greater of 25.0% of the Loan Cap and $12,500), and (iii) the pro forma Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio after giving effect to such contemplated dividend is no less than the minimum Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio for such quarter. In addition, the 2018 Term Loan Facility is subject to a Borrowing Base (as defined in the credit agreement of the 2018 Term Loan Facility) which can, under certain conditions, result in the imposition of a reserve under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. As of January 30, 2021, the Company was in compliance with applicable covenants.

The 2018 Term Loan Facility also contains an Excess Cash Flow (as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Term Loan Facility) sweep requirement in which Vince, LLC remits 50% of Excess Cash Flow reduced on a dollar-for-dollar basis by any voluntary prepayments of the 2018 Term Loan Facility or the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility (to the extent accompanied by a permanent reduction in commitments) during such fiscal year or after the fiscal year but prior to the date of the excess cash flow payment, to be applied to the outstanding principal balance commencing 10 business days after the filing of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K starting from fiscal year ended February 1, 2020. There was no such payment due for fiscal years ended January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020.  

On March 30, 2020, Vince, LLC entered into the Limited Waiver and Amendment (the “Second Term Loan Amendment”) to the 2018 Term Loan Facility. The Second Term Loan Amendment postponed the amortization payment due on April 1, 2020, with 50% of such payment to be paid on July 1, 2020 and the remainder to be paid on October 1, 2020 and modifies certain reporting obligations.

On June 8, 2020, Vince, LLC entered into the Third Amendment (the “Third Term Loan Amendment”) to the 2018 Term Loan Facility. The Third Term Loan Amendment, among others, (i) temporarily suspends the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio covenant through the delivery of a compliance certificate relating to the fiscal quarter ended July 31, 2021 (such period, the “Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period”); (ii) requires Vince, LLC to maintain Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio of 1.0 to 1.0 in the event the excess availability under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility is less than (x) $10,000 between September 6, 2020 and January 9, 2021 and (y) $12,500 between January 10, 2021 and January 31, 2021 and (z) $15,000 during all other times during the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period; (iii) revises the Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio required to be maintained following the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period (commencing with the fiscal month ending July 31, 2021) to be 1.50 to 1.0 for the fiscal quarter ending July 31, 2021 and 1.75 to 1.0 for each fiscal quarter thereafter; (iv) waives the amortization payments due on July 1, 2020 and October 1, 2020 (including the amortization payment due on April 1, 2020 that was previously deferred under the Second Term Loan Amendment); (v) for any fiscal four quarter period ending prior to or on October 30, 2020, increasing the cap on certain items eligible to be added back to Consolidated EBITDA to 27.5% from 22.5%; and (vi) during the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period, allows Vince, LLC to cure any default under the applicable Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio covenant by including any amount provided by equity or subordinated debt (which amount shall be at least $1,000) in the calculation of excess availability under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility so that the excess availability is above the applicable threshold described above.

The Third Term Loan Amendment also (a) waives certain events of default; (b) temporarily revises the applicable margin to be 9.0% for one year after the Third Term Loan Amendment effective date (2.0% of which is to be accrued but not payable in cash until the first anniversary of the Third Term Loan Amendment effective date) and after such time and through the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period, 9.0% or 7.0% depending on the amount of Consolidated EBITDA; (c) increases the LIBOR floor from 0% to 1.0%; (d) eliminates the Borrower’s and any loan party’s ability to designate subsidiaries as unrestricted and to make certain payments, restricted payments and investments during the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period; (e) resets the prepayment premium to 3.0% of the prepaid amount if prepaid prior to the first anniversary of the Third Term Loan Amendment Effective Date, 1.5% of the prepaid amount if prepaid prior to the second anniversary of the Third Term Loan Amendment Effective Date and 0% thereafter; (f) imposes a requirement to pay down the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility to the extent cash on hand exceeds $5,000 on the last day of each week; (g) permits Vince, LLC to incur up to $8,000 of additional secured debt (in addition to any interest accrued or paid in kind), to the extent subordinated to the 2018 Term Loan Facility on terms reasonably acceptable to Crystal;  (h) extends the delivery periods for (x) annual financial statements for the fiscal year ended February 1, 2020 to June 15, 2020 and (y) quarterly financial statements for the fiscal quarters ended May 2, 2020 and ending August 1, 2020 to July 31, 2020 and October 29, 2020, respectively, and (i) grants ongoing relief through September 30, 2020 with respect to certain covenants regarding the payment of lease obligations.

As a result of the Third Term Loan Amendment, the Company incurred $383 of additional financing costs.  In accordance with ASC Topic 470, “Debt”, the Company accounted for this amendment as a debt modification and has recorded $233 of the financing costs paid to third parties within selling, general and administrative expenses on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) in fiscal 2020.  The remaining $150 of financing costs are recorded as deferred debt issuance costs which will be amortized over the remaining term of the 2018 Term Loan Facility.

On December 11, 2020, Vince, LLC entered into the Fifth Amendment (the “Fifth Term Loan Amendment”) to the 2018 Term Loan Facility. The Fifth Term Loan Amendment, among other things, (i) extends the suspension of the FCCR covenant through the Extended Accommodation Period; (ii) extends the period through which the applicable margin is increased to 9.0% or 7.0%, subject to a pricing grid based on Consolidated EBITDA through the Extended Accommodation Period; (iii) extends the period from October 30, 2021 to January 29, 2022, during which the cap on which certain items eligible to be added back to “Consolidated EBITDA” (as defined in the 2018 Term Loan Facility) is increased to 27.5% from 22.5%; (iv) requires Vince, LLC to maintain an FCCR of 1.0 to 1.0 in the event the excess availability under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility is less than (x) $7,500 through the end of the Accommodation Period; and (y) $10,000 from August 1, 2020 through the end of the Extended Accommodation Period; (v) revises the FCCR required to be maintained commencing with the fiscal quarter ending January 29, 2022 and for each fiscal quarter thereafter to be 1.25 to 1.0; (vi) waives the amortization payments due on January 1, 2021, April 1, 2021, July 1, 2021, October 1, 2021 and January 1, 2022; (vii) permits Vince, LLC to incur the debt under the Third Lien Credit Facility (as described below); (viii) resets the prepayment premium to 3.0% of the prepaid amount if prepaid prior to the first anniversary of the Fifth Term Loan Amendment effective date, 1.5% of the prepaid amount if  prepaid prior to the second anniversary of the Fifth Term Loan Amendment effective date and 0% thereafter; (ix) requires an engagement by the Company of a financial advisor from February 1, 2021 until March 31, 2021 (or until the excess availability is greater than 25% of the loan cap for a period of at least thirty days, whichever is later) to assist in the preparation of certain financial reports, including the review of the weekly cashflow reports and other items; and (x) revises the advance rate on the intellectual property to 60% of its appraised value. As of April 2021, the requirement to engage a financial advisor has been satisfied.

As a result of the Fifth Term Loan Amendment, the Company incurred $150 of additional financing costs. In accordance with ASC Topic 470, “Debt”, the Company accounted for this amendment as a debt modification and has recorded the additional deferred financing costs as deferred debt issuance costs which will be amortized over the remaining term of the 2018 Term Loan Facility and are included in accrued liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 30, 2021.

On April 26, 2021, Vince, LLC entered into the Sixth Amendment (the “Sixth Term Loan Amendment”) to the 2018 Term Loan Facility. See Note 15 “Subsequent Events” for further information.

Through January 30, 2021, on an inception to date basis, the Company had made repayments totaling $2,750 in the aggregate on the 2018 Term Loan Facility. As of January 30, 2021, the Company had $24,750 of debt outstanding under the 2018 Term Loan Facility.

Scheduled maturities of the 2018 Term Loan Facility are as follows:

 

 

2018 Term Loan

 

(in thousands)

 

Maturities

 

Fiscal 2021

 

$

 

Fiscal 2022

 

 

2,750

 

Fiscal 2023

 

 

22,000

 

      Total

 

$

24,750

 

 

2018 Revolving Credit Facility

 

On August 21, 2018, Vince, LLC entered into an $80,000 senior secured revolving credit facility (the “2018 Revolving Credit Facility”) pursuant to a credit agreement by and among Vince, LLC, as the borrower, VHC and Vince Intermediate, as guarantors, Citizens Bank, N.A. (“Citizens”), as administrative agent and collateral agent, and the other lenders from time to time party thereto. The 2018 Revolving Credit Facility provides for a revolving line of credit of up to $80,000, subject to a Loan Cap, which is the lesser of (i) the Borrowing Base as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility and (ii) the aggregate commitments, as well as a letter of credit sublimit of $25,000. It also provides for an increase in aggregate commitments of up to $20,000. The 2018 Revolving Credit Facility matures on the earlier of August 21, 2023 and the maturity date of the 2018 Term Loan Facility. On August 21, 2018, Vince, LLC incurred $39,555 of borrowings, prior to which $66,271 was available, given the Loan Cap as of such date.  

Interest is payable on the loans under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility at either the LIBOR or the Base Rate, in each case, with applicable margins subject to a pricing grid based on an average daily excess availability calculation. The “Base Rate” means, for any day, a fluctuating rate per annum equal to the highest of (i) the rate of interest in effect for such day as publicly announced from time to time by Citizens as its prime rate; (ii) the Federal Funds Rate for such day, plus 0.5%; and (iii) the LIBOR Rate for a one month interest period as determined on such day, plus 1.00%. During the continuance of certain specified events of default, at the election of Citizens, interest will accrue at a rate of 2.0% in excess of the applicable non-default rate.

The 2018 Revolving Credit Facility contains a requirement that, at any point when Excess Availability (as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility) is less than 10.0% of the loan cap and continuing until Excess Availability exceeds the greater of such amounts for 30 consecutive days, Vince must maintain during that time a Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio (as defined in the credit agreement for the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility) equal to or greater than 1.0 to 1.0 measured as of the last day of each fiscal month during such period.

The 2018 Revolving Credit Facility contains representations and warranties, other covenants and events of default that are customary for this type of financing, including covenants with respect to limitations on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, liens, burdensome agreements, guarantees, investments, loans, asset sales, mergers, acquisitions, prepayment of other debt, the repurchase of capital stock, transactions with affiliates, and the ability to change the nature of the Company’s business or its fiscal year. The 2018 Revolving Credit Facility generally permits dividends in the absence of any event of default (including any event of default arising from a contemplated dividend), so long as (i) after giving pro forma effect to the contemplated dividend and for the following six months Excess Availability will be at least the greater of 20.0% of the Loan Cap and $10,000 and (ii) after giving pro forma effect to the contemplated dividend, the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio for the 12 months preceding such dividend will be greater than or equal to 1.0 to 1.0 (provided that the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio may be less than 1.0 to 1.0 if, after giving pro forma effect to the contemplated dividend, Excess Availability for the six fiscal months following the dividend is at least the greater of 25.0% of the Loan Cap and $12,500). As of January 30, 2021, the Company was in compliance with applicable covenants.

On November 1, 2019, Vince, LLC entered into the First Amendment (the “First Revolver Amendment”) to the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility, which provides the borrower the ability to elect the Daily LIBOR Rate in lieu of the Base Rate to be applied to the borrowings upon applicable notice.  The “Daily LIBOR Rate” means a rate equal to the Adjusted LIBOR Rate in effect on such day for deposits for a one day period, provided that, upon notice and not more than once every 90 days, such rate may be substituted for a one week or one month period for the Adjusted LIBOR Rate for a one day period.

On November 4, 2019, Vince, LLC entered into the Second Amendment (the “Second Revolver Amendment”) to the credit agreement of the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. The Second Revolver Amendment increased the aggregate commitments under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility by $20,000 to $100,000. Pursuant to the terms of the Second Revolver Amendment, the Acquired Businesses became guarantors under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility and jointly and severally liable for the obligations thereunder. Simultaneously, Vince, LLC entered into a Joinder Amendment to the credit agreement of the 2018 Term Loan Facility whereby the Acquired Businesses became guarantors under the 2018 Term Loan Facility and jointly and severally liable for the obligations thereunder.

On June 8, 2020, Vince, LLC entered into the Third Amendment (the “Third Revolver Amendment”) to the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. The Third Revolver Amendment, among others, increases availability under the facility’s borrowing base by (i) temporarily increasing the aggregate commitments under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility to $110,000 through November 30, 2020 (such period, the “Third Amendment Accommodation Period”) (ii) temporarily revising the eligibility of certain account debtors during the Third Amendment Accommodation Period by extending by 30 days the period during which those accounts may remain outstanding past due as well as increasing the concentration limits of certain account debtors and (iii) for any fiscal four quarter period ending prior to or on October 30, 2021, increasing the cap on certain items eligible to be added back to Consolidated EBITDA to 27.5% from 22.5%.

The Third Revolver Amendment also (a) waives events of default; (b) temporarily increases the applicable margin on all borrowings of revolving loans by 0.75% per annum during the Third Amendment Accommodation Period and increases the LIBOR floor from 0% to 1.0%; (c) eliminates Vince LLC’s and any loan party’s ability to designate subsidiaries as unrestricted and to make certain payments, restricted payments and investments during the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period; (d) temporarily suspends the Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio covenant through the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period; (e) requires Vince, LLC to maintain a Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio of 1.0 to 1.0 in the event the excess availability under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility is less than (x) $10,000 between September 6, 2020 and January 9, 2021, (y) $12,500 between January 10, 2021 and January 31, 2021 and (z) $15,000 at all other times during the Third Amendment Extended Accommodation Period; (f)  imposes a requirement (y) to pay down the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility to the extent cash on hand exceeds $5,000 on the last day of each week and (z) that, after giving effect to any borrowing thereunder, Vince, LLC may have no more than $5,000 of cash on hand; (g) permits Vince, LLC to incur up to $8,000 of additional secured debt (in addition to any interest accrued or paid in kind), to the extent subordinated to the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility on terms reasonably acceptable to Citizens; (h) establishes a method for imposing a successor reference rate if LIBOR should become unavailable, (i) extends the delivery periods for (x) annual financial statements for the fiscal year ended February 1, 2020 to June 15, 2020 and (y) quarterly financial statements for the fiscal quarters ended May 2, 2020 and ending August 1, 2020 to July 31, 2020 and October 29, 2020, respectively, and (j) grants ongoing relief through September 30, 2020 with respect to certain covenants regarding the payment of lease obligations.

As a result of the Third Revolver Amendment, the Company incurred $376 of additional deferred financing costs. In accordance with ASC Topic 470, “Debt”, the Company accounted for this amendment as a debt modification and has recorded the additional deferred financing costs as deferred debt issuance costs which will be amortized over the remaining term of the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility.

On December 11, 2020, Vince, LLC entered into the Fifth Revolver Amendment to the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. The Fifth Revolver Amendment, among other things, (i) extends the period from November 30, 2020 to July 31, 2021 (such period, “Accommodation Period”), during which the eligibility of certain account debtors is revised by extending by 30 days the time those accounts may remain outstanding past due as well as increasing the concentration limits of certain account debtors; (ii) extends the period through which the applicable margin on all borrowings of revolving loans by 0.75% per annum during such Accommodation Period; (iii) extends the period from October 30, 2021 to January 29, 2022, during which the cap on which certain items eligible to be added back to “Consolidated EBITDA” (as defined in the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility) is increased to 27.5% from 22.5%; (iv) extends the temporary suspension of the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio (“FCCR”) covenant through the delivery of a compliance certificate relating to the fiscal quarter ended January 29, 2022 (such period, the “Extended Accommodation Period”), other than the fiscal quarter ending January 29, 2022; (v) requires Vince, LLC to maintain an FCCR of 1.0 to 1.0 in the event the excess availability under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility is less than (x) $7,500 through the end of the Accommodation Period; and (y) $10,000 from August 1, 2020 through the end of the Extended Accommodation Period; (vi) permits Vince, LLC to incur the debt under the Third Lien Credit Facility (as described below); (vii) revises the definition of “Cash Dominion Trigger Amount” to mean $15,000 through the end of the Extended Accommodation Period and at all other times thereafter, 12.5% of the loan cap and $5,000, whichever is greater; (viii) deems the Cash Dominion Event (as defined in the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility) as triggered during the Accommodation Period; and (ix) requires an engagement by the Company of a financial advisor from February 1, 2021 until March 31, 2021 (or until the excess availability is greater than 25% of the loan cap for a period of at least thirty days, whichever is later) to assist in the preparation of certain financial reports, including the review of the weekly cashflow reports and other items. As of April 2021, the requirement to engage a financial advisor has been satisfied.

As a result of the Fifth Revolver Amendment, the Company incurred $204 of additional deferred financing costs. In accordance with ASC Topic 470, “Debt”, the Company accounted for this amendment as a debt modification and has recorded the additional deferred financing costs as deferred debt issuance costs which will be amortized over the remaining term of the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. $100 of financing costs are included in accrued liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 30, 2021.

On April 26, 2021, concurrently with the Sixth Term Loan Amendment, the Company entered into the Sixth Amendment (the “Sixth Revolver Amendment”) to the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. See Note 15 “Subsequent Events” for further information.

As of January 30, 2021, $30,176 was available under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility, net of the loan cap, and there were $40,399 of borrowings outstanding and $5,195 of letters of credit outstanding under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. The weighted average interest rate for borrowings outstanding under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility as of January 30, 2021, was 3.8%.

As of February 1, 2020, $59,916 was available under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility, net of the loan cap, and there were $27,723 of borrowings outstanding and $6,505 of letters of credit outstanding under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. The weighted average interest rate for borrowings outstanding under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility as of February 1, 2020, was 3.3%.

Third Lien Credit Agreement

On December 11, 2020, Vince, LLC entered into a $20,000 subordinated term loan credit facility (the “Third Lien Credit Facility”) pursuant to a credit agreement (the “Third Lien Credit Agreement”), dated December 11, 2020, by and among Vince, LLC, as the borrower, SK Financial Services, LLC (“SK Financial”), as agent and lender, and other lenders from time to time party thereto. The Third Lien Credit Facility matures on the earlier of (a) February 21, 2024, (b) the date that is 360 days after the “Maturity Date” under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility so long as the loans under the 2018 Term Loan Facility remain outstanding and (c) 180 days after the “Maturity Date” under the 2018 Term Loan Facility and the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility.

SK Financial is an affiliate of Sun Capital, whose affiliates own approximately 72% of the Company’s common stock.  The Third Lien Credit Facility was reviewed and approved by the Special Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors, consisting solely of directors not affiliated with Sun Capital, which committee was represented by independent legal advisors.

Interest on loans under the Third Lien Credit Facility is payable in kind at a rate equal to the LIBOR rate (subject to a floor of 1.0%) plus applicable margins subject to a pricing grid based on minimum Consolidated EBITDA (as defined in the Third Lien Credit Agreement).  During the continuance of certain specified events of default, interest may accrue on the loans under the Third Lien Credit Facility at a rate of 2.0% in excess of the rate otherwise applicable to such amount.  The Third Lien Credit Facility contains representations, covenants and conditions that are substantially similar to those under the 2018 Term Loan Facility, except the Third Lien Credit Facility does not contain any financial covenant.

The Company has incurred $485 in deferred financing costs associated with the Third Lien Credit Facility of which a $400 closing fee is payable in kind and is added to the principal balance. These deferred financing costs are recorded as deferred debt issuance costs which will be amortized over the remaining term of the Third Lien Credit Facility.

All obligations under the Third Lien Credit Facility are guaranteed by the Company, Vince Intermediate Holding, LLC and the Company’s existing material domestic restricted subsidiaries as well as any future material domestic restricted subsidiaries and are secured on a junior basis relative to the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility and the 2018 Term Loan Facility by a lien on substantially all of the assets of the Company, Vince Intermediate Holding, LLC, Vince, LLC and the Company’s existing material domestic restricted subsidiaries as well as any future material domestic restricted subsidiaries.

The proceeds were received on December 11, 2020 and were used to repay a portion of the borrowings outstanding under the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility.

Acquired Businesses Short-Term Borrowings

On July 23, 2014, Parker Lifestyle, LLC, as borrower, and Sun Capital Partners V, L.P., as guarantor, entered into a Loan Authorization Agreement with BMO Harris Bank N.A., as lender, for a revolving credit facility.  On December 21, 2016, that facility was amended to include Rebecca Taylor, Inc. The maximum credit line was $25,000 (the "BMO Obligations") subject to a maximum credit limit, which required that the sum of (i) the aggregate principal amounts of loans outstanding, (ii) the aggregate undrawn stated amount of letters of credit issued under the credit facility, and (iii) the aggregate amount of any unreimbursed draws under any letters of credit issued, shall not exceed the credit limit.  Any letters of credit issued under the BMO Obligations credit facility were subject to the same maximum credit line. On November 3, 2019, in conjunction with the acquisition of the Acquired Businesses, $19,099, plus accrued interest, of the cash consideration was used to pay-off the outstanding debt obligation under this facility. On November 3, 2019, at the request of the Company and upon the satisfaction of certain release conditions, the BMO Obligations were released.

v3.21.1
Commitments and Contingencies
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Commitments And Contingencies Disclosure [Abstract]  
Commitments and Contingencies

Note 6. Commitments and Contingencies

Leases

The Company leases its office spaces, showrooms and retail stores under operating leases which have remaining terms up to ten years, excluding renewal terms. Most of the Company’s real estate leases contain covenants that require the Company to pay real estate taxes, insurance, and other executory costs. Certain of these leases require contingent rent payments or contain kick-out clauses and/or opt-out clauses, based on the operating results of the retail operations utilizing the leased premises. Rent under leases with scheduled rent changes or lease concessions are recorded on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Rent expense under all operating leases was $23,723 and $29,230 for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, respectively, which is recorded within SG&A expenses.

The future minimum lease payments under operating leases at January 30, 2021 were as follows:

 

 

 

Minimum Lease

 

(in thousands)

 

Payments

 

Fiscal 2021

 

$

28,590

 

Fiscal 2022

 

 

27,592

 

Fiscal 2023

 

 

25,368

 

Fiscal 2024

 

 

23,615

 

Fiscal 2025

 

 

14,515

 

Thereafter

 

 

22,023

 

Total minimum lease payments

 

$

141,703

 

 

Other Contractual Cash Obligations

At January 30, 2021, the Company’s other contractual cash obligations of $44,253 consisted primarily of inventory purchase obligations and service contracts.

Litigation

On September 7, 2018, a complaint was filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York by certain stockholders (collectively, the “Plaintiff”), naming the Company as well as David Stefko, the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, one of the Company’s directors, certain of the Company’s former officers and directors, and Sun Capital and certain of its affiliates, as defendants. The complaint generally alleges that the Company and the named parties made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose matters relating to the transition of the Company’s ERP systems from Kellwood. The complaint brings causes of action for violations of Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and Rule 10b-5 promulgated under the Exchange Act against the Company and the named parties and for violations of Section 20(a) of the Exchange Act against the individual parties, Sun Capital and its affiliates.  The complaint sought unspecified monetary damages and unspecified costs and fees. On January 28, 2019, in response to our motion to dismiss the original complaint, the Plaintiff filed an amended complaint, naming the same defendants as parties and asserting the same causes of action as those stated in the original complaint. On October 4, 2019, an individual stockholder filed a complaint marked as a related suit to the amended complaint, containing substantially identical allegations and claims against the same defendant parties. On September 9, 2020, the two complaints were dismissed in their entirety and the Plaintiff’s request for leave to replead was denied. On October 6, 2020, the Plaintiff filed notices of appeal. The appeals are pending.

On September 6, 2019, Vince, LLC received a favorable judgment from the second instance court in the People’s Republic of China in connection with a trademark infringement case. The judgment awarded Vince, LLC approximately $700 in damages and fees, net of applicable taxes, which was included in selling, general and administrative expense in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive earnings (loss). This amount was subsequently paid in full to Vince, LLC by the defendants in the case in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019.

Additionally, the Company is a party to other legal proceedings, compliance matters, environmental, as well as wage and hour and other labor claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. Although the outcome of such items cannot be determined with certainty, management believes that the ultimate outcome of these items, individually and in the aggregate, will not have a material adverse impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

v3.21.1
Share-Based Compensation
12 Months Ended
Jan. 30, 2021
Disclosure Of Compensation Related Costs Sharebased Payments [Abstract]  
Share-Based Compensation

Note 7. Share-Based Compensation

Employee Stock Plans

Vince 2013 Incentive Plan

In connection with the IPO, the Company adopted the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan, which provides for grants of stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, and other stock-based awards. In May 2018, the Company filed a Registration Statement on Form S-8 to register an additional 660,000 shares of common stock available for issuance under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan. Additionally, in September 2020, the Company filed a Registration Statement on Form S-8 to register an additional 1,000,000 shares of common stock available for issuance under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan. The aggregate number of shares of common stock which may be issued or used for reference purposes under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan or with respect to which awards may be granted may not exceed 1,000,000 shares. The shares available for issuance under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan may be, in whole or in part, either authorized and unissued shares of the Company’s common stock or shares of common stock held in or acquired for the Company’s treasury. In general, if awards under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan are cancelled for any reason, or expire or terminate unexercised, the shares covered by such award may again be available for the grant of awards under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan. As of January 30, 2021, there were 1,444,338 shares under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan available for future grants. Options granted pursuant to the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan typically vest in equal installments over four years, subject to the employees’ continued employment and expire on the earlier of the tenth anniversary of the grant date or upon termination as outlined in the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan. Restricted stock units (“RSUs”) granted vest in equal installments over a three-year period or vest in equal installments over four years, subject to the employees’ continued employment, except for RSUs issued under the exchange offer described below.

On April 26, 2018, the Company commenced a tender offer to exchange certain options to purchase shares of its common stock, whether vested or unvested, from eligible employees and executive officers for replacement restricted stock units (“Replacement RSUs”) granted under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan (the “Option Exchange”). Employees and executive officers of the Company on the date of offer commencement and those who remained an employee or executive officer of the Company through the expiration date of the offer and held at least one option as of the commencement of the offer that was granted under the Vince 2013 Incentive Plan were eligible to participate.  The exchange ratio of this offer was a 1-to-1.7857 basis (one stock option exchanged for every 1.7857 Replacement RSUs). This tender offer expired on 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on May 24, 2018 (the “Offer Expiration Date”). The Replacement RSUs were granted on the business day immediately following the Offer Expiration Date.  As a result of the Option Exchange, 149,819 stock options were cancelled and 267,538 Replacement RSUs were granted with a grant date fair value of $9.15 per unit. All Replacement RSUs vest pursuant to the following schedule: 10% on April 19, 2019; 20% on April 17, 2020; 25% on April 16, 2021; and 45% on April 15, 2022, subject to the holder’s remaining continuously employed with the Company through each such applicable vesting date. Replacement RSUs have the new vesting schedule regardless of whether the surrendered eligible options were partially vested at the time it was exchanged. The purpose of this exchange was to foster retention, motivate our key contributors, and better align the interests of our employees and stockholders to maximize stockholder value.

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

The Company maintains an employee stock purchase plan (“ESPP”) for its employees. Under the ESPP, all eligible employees may contribute up to 10% of their base compensation, up to a maximum contribution of $10 per year. The purchase price of the stock is 90% of the fair market value, with purchases executed on a quarterly basis. The plan is defined as compensatory, and accordingly, a charge for compensation expense is recorded to SG&A expense for the difference between the fair market value and the discounted purchase price of the Company’s Stock. During fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, 9,024 and 2,190 shares of common stock, respectively, were issued under the ESPP. As of January 30, 2021, there were 82,111 shares available for future issuance under the ESPP.

Stock Options

A summary of stock option activity for both employees and non-employees for fiscal 2020 is as follows:

 

 

 

Stock Options

 

 

Weighted Average Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term (years)

 

 

Aggregate Intrinsic Value

(in thousands)

 

Outstanding at February 1, 2020

 

 

175

 

 

$

38.87

 

 

 

5.7

 

 

$

 

Granted

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited or expired

 

 

(117

)

 

$

38.92

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding at January 30, 2021

 

 

58

 

 

$

38.77

 

 

 

4.7

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vested and exercisable at January 30, 2021

 

 

58

 

 

$

38.77

 

 

 

4.7

 

 

$

 

 

Restricted Stock Units

A summary of restricted stock unit activity for fiscal 2020 is as follows:

 

 

 

Restricted Stock Units

 

 

Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value

 

Non-vested restricted stock units at February 1, 2020

 

 

679,926

 

 

$

11.12

 

Granted

 

 

89,507

 

 

$

6.48

 

Vested

 

 

(162,052

)