ALTERYX, INC., 10-Q filed on 5/10/2018
Quarterly Report
v3.8.0.1
Document and Entity Information - shares
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
May 03, 2018
Document Information [Line Items]    
Document Type 10-Q  
Amendment Flag false  
Document Period End Date Mar. 31, 2018  
Document Fiscal Year Focus 2018  
Document Fiscal Period Focus Q1  
Trading Symbol AYX  
Entity Registrant Name Alteryx, Inc.  
Entity Central Index Key 0001689923  
Current Fiscal Year End Date --12-31  
Entity Filer Category Non-accelerated Filer  
Class A Common Stock [Member]    
Document Information [Line Items]    
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding   28,653,786
Class B Common Stock [Member]    
Document Information [Line Items]    
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding   31,951,729
v3.8.0.1
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss - USD ($)
shares in Thousands, $ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Mar. 31, 2017
Income Statement [Abstract]    
Revenue $ 42,821 $ 28,545
Cost of revenue 5,004 4,826
Gross profit 37,817 23,719
Operating expenses:    
Research and development 10,768 6,022
Sales and marketing 23,102 15,628
General and administrative 9,795 7,683
Total operating expenses 43,665 29,333
Loss from operations (5,848) (5,614)
Other income, net 768 97
Loss before provision for income taxes (5,080) (5,517)
Provision for income taxes 106 150
Net loss (5,186) (5,667)
Less: Accretion of Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock   (1,983)
Net loss attributable to common stockholders $ (5,186) $ (7,650)
Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted $ (0.09) $ (0.22)
Weighted-average shares used to compute net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted 60,052 35,126
Net loss $ (5,186) $ (5,667)
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax:    
Net unrealized holding loss on investments, net of tax (167) (11)
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax (3) (48)
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax (170) (59)
Total comprehensive loss $ (5,356) $ (5,726)
v3.8.0.1
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Current assets:    
Cash and cash equivalents $ 59,077 $ 119,716
Short-term investments 119,810 54,386
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts and sales reserves of $1,681 and $1,714 as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively 29,345 49,797
Deferred commissions 11,541 11,213
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 9,965 7,227
Total current assets 229,738 242,339
Property and equipment, net 8,603 7,492
Long-term investments 26,856 19,964
Goodwill 9,867 8,750
Intangible assets, net 10,856 7,995
Other assets 2,757 4,263
Deferred incomes taxes, net 612 613
Total assets 289,289 291,416
Current liabilities:    
Accounts payable 1,193 522
Accrued payroll and payroll related liabilities 9,262 11,835
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities 7,770 8,270
Deferred revenue 108,235 110,213
Total current liabilities 126,460 130,840
Deferred revenue 3,479 3,545
Other liabilities 3,000 3,313
Deferred income tax, net 222 214
Total liabilities 133,161 137,912
Stockholders' equity:    
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value: 10,000 shares authorized as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively; no shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively 0 0
Common stock, $0.0001 par value: 500,000 Class A shares authorized, 28,244 and 26,687 shares issued and outstanding, as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively; 500,000 Class B shares authorized, 32,344 and 32,948 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively 6 5
Additional paid-in capital 266,957 257,399
Accumulated deficit (110,311) (103,546)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (524) (354)
Total stockholders' equity 156,128 153,504
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity $ 289,289 $ 291,416
v3.8.0.1
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets (Parenthetical) - USD ($)
shares in Thousands, $ in Thousands
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Allowance for doubtful accounts and sales reserves $ 1,681 $ 1,714
Preferred stock, par value (in dollars per share) $ 0.0001 $ 0.0001
Preferred stock, shares authorized (in shares) 10,000 10,000
Preferred stock, shares issued (in shares) 0 0
Preferred stock, shares outstanding (in shares) 0 0
Class A Common Stock [Member]    
Common stock par value per share (in dollars per share) $ 0.0001 $ 0.0001
Common stock shares authorized (in shares) 500,000 500,000
Common Stock shares issued (in shares) 28,244 26,687
Common stock shares outstanding (in shares) 28,244 26,687
Class B Common Stock [Member]    
Common stock par value per share (in dollars per share) $ 0.0001 $ 0.0001
Common stock shares authorized (in shares) 500,000 500,000
Common Stock shares issued (in shares) 32,344 32,948
Common stock shares outstanding (in shares) 32,344 32,948
v3.8.0.1
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders Equity - 3 months ended Mar. 31, 2018 - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Total
Common Stock [Member]
Additional Paid-in Capital [Member]
Accumulated Deficit [Member]
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss [Member]
Beginning Balance at Dec. 31, 2017 $ 153,504 $ 5 $ 257,399 $ (103,546) $ (354)
Beginning Balance, Shares at Dec. 31, 2017   59,635,000      
Cumulative effect of adoption of accounting standards (1,438)   141 (1,579)  
Shares issued pursuant to stock awards 4,973 $ 1 4,972    
Shares issued pursuant to stock awards, shares   934,000      
Stock-based compensation 3,789   3,789    
Equity settled contingent consideration, value $ 656   656    
Equity settled contingent consideration, shares 18,869 19,000      
Cumulative translation adjustment $ (3)       (3)
Unrealized loss on investments (167)       (167)
Net loss (5,186)     (5,186)  
Ending Balance at Mar. 31, 2018 $ 156,128 $ 6 $ 266,957 $ (110,311) $ (524)
Ending Balance, Shares at Mar. 31, 2018   60,588,000      
v3.8.0.1
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Mar. 31, 2017
Cash flows from operating activities:    
Net loss $ (5,186) $ (5,667)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:    
Depreciation and amortization 1,301 566
Stock-based compensation 3,789 1,942
Provision for doubtful accounts, net of recoveries (108) 350
Change in fair value of contingent consideration 293  
Loss on disposal of assets   30
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effect of business acquisitions:    
Accounts receivable 20,553 11,175
Deferred commissions (218) 860
Prepaid expenses and other current assets and other assets (2,584) (1,220)
Accounts payable 443 (525)
Accrued payroll and payroll related liabilities (2,636) (3,506)
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities (1,658) 977
Deferred revenue (1,887) (118)
Other liabilities (1) 159
Net cash provided by operating activities 12,101 5,023
Cash flows from investing activities:    
Purchases of property and equipment (1,416) (508)
Cash paid in business acquisitions, net of cash acquired (3,542) (3,884)
Purchases of investments (83,591) (16,035)
Maturities of investments 11,000 8,524
Net cash used in investing activities (77,549) (11,903)
Cash flows from financing activities:    
Proceeds from initial public offering, net of underwriting commissions and discounts   117,180
Payment of initial public offering costs   (797)
Payment of holdback funds from acquisition (250)  
Principal payments on capital lease obligations (83) (82)
Proceeds from exercise of stock options 4,973 884
Net cash provided by financing activities 4,640 117,185
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents 169 (25)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (60,639) 110,280
Cash and cash equivalents-beginning of period 119,716 31,306
Cash and cash equivalents-end of period 59,077 141,586
Supplemental disclosure of noncash investing and financing activities:    
Property and equipment recorded in accounts payable 360 356
Consideration for business acquisition initially included in accrued expenses and other current liabilities and other liabilities 1,200 1,660
Contingent consideration settled through issuance of common stock $ 656  
Accretion of Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock   1,983
Deferred initial public offering costs recorded in accounts payable and accrued expenses   1,329
Series A Redeemable Convertible Preferred Stock [Member]    
Supplemental disclosure of noncash investing and financing activities:    
Accretion of Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock   1,983
Conversion of Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock to common shares   $ 101,165
v3.8.0.1
Business
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Business

1. Business

Our Company

Alteryx, Inc. and its subsidiaries, or we, our, or us, are improving business through data science and analytics. Our end-to-end software platform enables users in an organization to improve business outcomes and the productivity of their business analysts and data scientists. Our subscription-based platform allows organizations to easily discover, prepare, blend, and analyze data from a multitude of sources and deliver data-driven decisions. The ease-of-use, speed, and sophistication that our platform provides is enhanced through intuitive and highly repeatable visual workflows.

Basis of Presentation

Our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements are presented in accordance with accounting standards generally accepted in the United States of America, or U.S. GAAP, for interim financial information. Certain information and disclosures normally included in consolidated financial statements presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP have been condensed or omitted. Accordingly, these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, on March 8, 2018. The unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a basis consistent with that used to prepare the audited annual consolidated financial statements and reflect all adjustments which are, in the opinion of our management, of a normal recurring nature and necessary for a fair statement of the condensed consolidated financial statements. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

The operating results for the three months ended March 31, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of the results expected for the full year ending December 31, 2018.

v3.8.0.1
Significant Accounting Policies
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Significant Accounting Policies

2. Significant Accounting Policies

There have been no changes to our accounting policies disclosed in our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes for the year ended December 31, 2017 other than, during the three months ended March 31, 2018, we adopted new accounting guidance related to stock-based compensation and to income tax effects of intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory. See “Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements” below.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from these estimates and assumptions.

On an ongoing basis, our management evaluates estimates and assumptions based on historical data and experience, as well as various other factors that our management believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities.

Variable Interest Entities

In accordance with ASC 810, Consolidation, the applicable accounting guidance for the consolidation of variable interest entities, or VIEs, we analyze our interests to determine if such interests are variable interests. If variable interests are identified, then the related entity is assessed to determine if it is a VIE. VIEs are generally entities that have either a total equity investment that is insufficient to permit the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support, or whose equity investors lack the characteristics of a controlling financial interest (i.e., ability to make significant decisions through voting rights and a right to receive the expected residual returns of the entity or an obligation to absorb the expected losses of the entity). If we determine that the entity is a VIE, we then assess if we must consolidate the VIE. We deem ourselves to be the primary beneficiary if we have both (i) the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance, and (ii) an obligation to absorb losses of the entity that could potentially be significant to the VIE, or a right to receive benefits from the entity that could be significant to the VIE.

 

As of December 31, 2017 and March 31, 2018, we determined that two and one of our distributors were VIEs under the guidance of ASC 810, Consolidation, respectively. These determinations were due to (i) our participation in the design of the distributor’s legal entity, (ii) our having a variable interest in the distributor, and (iii) our having the right to residual returns. We determined that we were not the primary beneficiary of these VIEs because we did not have (a) the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the VIE’s economic performance, and (b) the obligation to absorb losses of the VIE or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant. Therefore, we did not consolidate any assets or liabilities of these VIE’s in our consolidated balance sheets or record the results of these distributors in our consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss. Transactions with the VIEs were accounted for in the same manner as our other distributors and resellers. As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, we had no exposure to losses from the contractual relationships with these VIEs or commitments to fund these VIEs. During the three months ended March 31, 2018, we acquired 100% of the outstanding equity of one of our VIEs. Our condensed consolidated financial statements include the assets and liabilities and the results of operations of the acquired company commencing as of the acquisition date. See Note 3 for additional information.

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

Under the Jumpstart our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act, we meet the definition of an emerging growth company, or EGC. We have elected to use this extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards pursuant to Section 107(b) of the JOBS Act.

In October 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, 2016-16, Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory. This guidance removes the prohibition in ASC 740, Income Taxes, against the immediate recognition of the current and deferred income tax effects of intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory. This guidance is intended to reduce the complexity of U.S. GAAP and diversity in practice related to the tax consequences of certain types of intra-entity asset transfers, particularly those involving intellectual property. The impact of adoption is recorded using the modified retrospective transition basis through a cumulative-effect adjustment to accumulated deficit as of the beginning of the period of adoption. We early adopted ASU 2016-16 on January 1, 2018, resulting in the elimination of $1.4 million of deferred tax charges included in other assets in our consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2017. We recorded the elimination of the deferred charge to accumulated deficit as of January 1, 2018.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, or ASU 2016-09, which simplifies several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions and related tax impacts, the classification of excess tax benefits on the statement of cash flows, statutory tax withholding requirements, and other stock-based compensation classification matters. We adopted ASU 2016-09 on January 1, 2018. Upon adoption, we recognized $2.4 million of previously unrecognized excess tax benefits related to stock awards using the modified retrospective transition method. We recorded the recognized excess tax benefits as a deferred tax asset, which was then fully offset by our U.S. federal and state deferred tax asset valuation allowance resulting in no impact to our accumulated deficit. Immediately prior to adoption, we had no unrecognized excess tax benefits related to stock awards in jurisdictions outside the United States. All future excess tax benefits resulting from the settlement of stock awards will be recorded to income tax expense. Additionally, upon adoption, we changed our accounting policy to account for forfeitures when they occur rather than estimate a forfeiture rate, the result of which was recorded using the modified retrospective transition basis through a cumulative-effect adjustment to accumulated deficit and additional paid-in-capital of $0.1 million as of January 1, 2018.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by removing the requirement to perform a hypothetical purchase price allocation to compute the implied fair value of goodwill to measure impairment. Instead, any goodwill impairment will equal the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. Further, the guidance eliminates the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative assessment and, if it fails that qualitative test, to perform Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. For public companies, this guidance is effective for annual or any interim goodwill impairment test in annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for any annual or interim goodwill impairment test in annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption is permitted and will be applied to any acquisitions after adoption on a prospective basis. While we continue to assess the potential impact of the adoption of this guidance, we do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Clarifying the Definition of a Business, which narrows the application of when an integrated set of assets and activities is considered a business and provides a framework to assist entities in evaluating whether both an input and a substantive process are present to be considered a business. It is expected that the new guidance will reduce the number of transactions that would need to be further evaluated and accounted for as a business. For public companies, this guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted and will be applied on a prospective basis. We are evaluating the potential impact of adopting this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Restricted Cash, which requires that restricted cash be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning and ending total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. For public companies, this guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and should be applied using a retrospective transition method to each period presented. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. We have not yet determined the timing of adoption. We currently present changes in restricted cash within investing activities and so the adoption of this guidance will result in changes in net cash flows from investing activities and to certain beginning and ending cash and cash equivalent totals shown on our consolidated statement of cash flows.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments, which addresses eight specific cash flow issues with the objective of reducing the existing diversity in practice, including presentation of cash flows relating to contingent consideration payments, proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, and debt prepayment or debt extinguishment costs, among other matters. For public companies, this guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If adopted in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. Adoption of this guidance is required to be applied using a retrospective transition method to each period presented, unless impracticable to do so. We are currently evaluating the potential impact of this guidance on our consolidated statement of cash flows.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases, creating Topic 842, which requires lessees to record the assets and liabilities arising from all leases in the statement of financial position. Under ASU 2016-02, lessees will recognize a liability for lease payments and a right-of-use asset. When measuring assets and liabilities, a lessee should include amounts related to option terms, such as the option of extending or terminating the lease or purchasing the underlying asset, that are reasonably certain to be exercised. For leases with a term of 12 months or less, lessees are permitted to make an accounting policy election to not recognize lease assets and liabilities. This guidance retains the distinction between finance leases and operating leases and the classification criteria remains similar. For financing leases, a lessee will recognize the interest on a lease liability separate from amortization of the right-of-use asset. In addition, repayments of principal will be presented within financing activities, and interest payments will be presented within operating activities in the statement of cash flows. For operating leases, a lessee will recognize a single lease cost on a straight-line basis and classify all cash payments within operating activities in the statement of cash flows. For public companies, this guidance will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and is required to be applied using a modified retrospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. We are evaluating the potential impact of this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. This guidance replaces most existing revenue recognition guidance. It provides principles for recognizing revenue for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers with the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, which deferred the effective date of ASU 2014-09 by one year. During 2016 and 2017, the FASB continued to issue additional amendments to this new revenue guidance. For public companies, this new revenue guidance will be effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim reporting periods within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. We are evaluating the potential impact of this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

v3.8.0.1
Business Combinations
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Business Combinations [Abstract]  
Business Combinations

3. Business Combinations

In February 2018, we acquired 100% of the outstanding equity of Alteryx ANZ Pty Limited, or ANZ, in Sydney, Australia, our exclusive master distributor in Australia and New Zealand. The total purchase consideration for the acquisition was approximately $4.8 million consisting of (i) $3.3 million in cash consideration, (ii) $1.2 million in contingent consideration payable in cash, and (iii) $0.3 million for the settlement of preexisting relationships.

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the results of operations of the acquired company commencing as of the acquisition date. The preliminary allocation of the total purchase price for this acquisition was $0.3 million of net tangible assets, $3.4 million of identifiable intangible assets, consisting of customer contracts and relationships, and $1.1 million of residual goodwill, which was not tax deductible. This allocation is preliminary. The Company expects to complete the purchase price allocation during the three months ending June 30, 2018.

We determined the preliminary fair value of the customer contracts and relationships acquired in the acquisition using the multiple period excess earnings model. This model utilizes certain unobservable inputs, including discounted cash flows, historical and projected financial information, and customer attrition rates, classified as Level 3 measurements as defined by ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, or ASC 820. Based on the valuation models, we determined the preliminary fair value of the customer contracts and relationships to be $3.4 million with a weighted-average amortization period of seven years.

A portion of the consideration for the acquisition is subject to earn-out provisions. Additional contingent earn-out consideration of up to $1.5 million may be paid out to the former shareholder of ANZ over two years upon the achievement of specified milestones. We utilized a probability weighted scenario-based model to determine the fair value of the contingent consideration. Based on this valuation model, we determined the fair value of the contingent consideration to be $1.2 million as of the acquisition date. See Note 4 for additional information on contingent earn-out consideration.

In January 2017, we acquired 100% of the outstanding equity of Semanta, s.r.o., or Semanta. The total purchase consideration was approximately $5.6 million and consisted primarily of $3.1 million of completed technology intangible assets, $2.9 million of goodwill, and $0.4 million of net liabilities assumed.

Pro forma information and revenue and operating results of the acquired companies have not been presented for these acquisitions as the impact is not material to our condensed consolidated financial statements.

v3.8.0.1
Fair Value Measurements
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Fair Value Disclosures [Abstract]  
Fair Value Measurements

4. Fair Value Measurements

We utilize valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs to the extent possible. We determine fair value based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability in the principal or most advantageous market. When considering market participant assumptions in fair value measurements, the following fair value hierarchy distinguishes between observable and unobservable inputs, which are categorized in one of the following levels:

 

           Level 1    Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities at the measurement date.
  Level 2    Inputs other than Level 1 that are observable, either directly or indirectly, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active near the measurement date; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.
  Level 3    Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

The fair value of our money market funds was determined based on “Level 1” inputs.

 

The fair value of commercial paper, certificates of deposit, U.S. Treasury and agency bonds, and corporate bonds were determined based on “Level 2” inputs. The valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of commercial paper and certificates of deposit included observable market-based inputs for similar assets, which primarily include yield curves and time-to-maturity factors. The valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of U.S. Treasury and agency bonds and corporate bonds included standard observable inputs, including reported trades, quoted market prices, matrix pricing, benchmark yields, broker/dealer quotes, issuer spreads, two-sided markets or benchmark securities and data provided by third parties as many of the bonds are not actively traded.

There were no marketable securities measured on a recurring basis in the “Level 3” category.

We have not elected the fair value option as prescribed by ASC 825, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, for our financial assets and liabilities that are not otherwise required to be carried at fair value. Under ASC 820, material financial assets and liabilities not carried at fair value, such as our accounts receivable and payables, are reported at their carrying values.

Instruments Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis. The following tables present our cash and cash equivalents and investments’ costs, gross unrealized losses, and fair value by major security type recorded as cash and cash equivalents or short-term or long-term investments as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 (in thousands):

 

     As of March 31, 2018  
     Cost      Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Fair Value      Cash and
Cash
Equivalents
     Short-term
Investments
     Long-term
Investments
 

Cash

   $ 37,302      $ —       $ 37,302      $ 37,302      $ —        $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 1:

                

Money market funds

     11,082        —         11,082        11,082        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     11,082        —         11,082        11,082        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 2:

                

Commercial paper

     3,495        —         3,495        2,749        746        —    

Certificates of deposit

     4,052        —         4,052        —          1,500        2,552  

U.S. Treasury and agency bonds

     103,537        (266     103,271        7,944        76,425        18,902  

Corporate bonds

     46,668        (127     46,541        —          41,139        5,402  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     157,752        (393     157,359        10,693        119,810        26,856  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 3

     —          —         —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 206,136      $ (393   $ 205,743      $ 59,077      $ 119,810      $ 26,856  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     As of December 31, 2017  
     Cost      Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Fair Value      Cash and
Cash
Equivalents
     Short-term
Investments
     Long-term
Investments
 

Cash

   $ 100,651      $ —       $ 100,651      $ 100,651      $ —        $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 1:

                

Money market funds

     19,065        —         19,065        19,065        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     19,065        —         19,065        19,065        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 2:

                

U.S. Treasury and agency bonds

     44,968        (176     44,792        —          25,923        18,869  

Corporate bonds

     29,608        (50     29,558        —          28,463        1,095  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     74,576        (226     74,350        —          54,386        19,964  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 3

     —          —         —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 194,292      $ (226   $ 194,066      $ 119,716      $ 54,386      $ 19,964  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

There were no transfers between Level 1, Level 2, or Level 3 securities during the three months ended March 31, 2018. As of March 31, 2018, there were 64 securities with a fair value of $139.6 million in an unrealized loss position for less than 12 months. The gross unrealized losses of $0.4 million as of March 31, 2018 were due to changes in market rates, and we have determined the losses are temporary in nature.

All the long-term investments had maturities of between one and two years in duration as of March 31, 2018. Cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, and investments as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 held domestically were approximately $198.1 million and $181.3 million, respectively.

Contingent Consideration. Contingent consideration in connection with acquisitions is measured at fair value each reporting period based on significant unobservable inputs, classified as Level 3 measurement. See Note 3 for additional information on the valuation of the contingent consideration as of the acquisition date. The contingentearn-out consideration has been recorded in accrued expenses and other current liabilities and other liabilities in our accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet with any changes in fair value each reporting period recorded in general and administrative expenses in our condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss. Changes in fair value depend on several factors including estimates of the timing and ability to achieve the milestones.

The following table presents a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances of acquisition-related accrued contingent consideration using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Beginning balance

   $ 975      $ —    

Obligations assumed

     1,200        1,160  

Change in fair value

     293        —    

Settlement

     (656      —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 1,812      $ 1,160  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Upon the achievement of certain milestones in connection with our acquisition of Semanta, we released 18,869 shares of Class A common stock to the former shareholders of Semanta in the three months ended March 31, 2018. In addition, 5,381 shares were earned, but held back for customary indemnification matters in accordance with the acquisition agreement, and the value of the shares is presented within additional paid-in capital in the condensed consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2018. Subject to any indemnification claims that may arise during the indemnification period, these shares will be issued to the former shareholders upon the completion of the indemnification period.

Instruments Not Recorded at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis. The carrying amounts of our financial instruments, including cash, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other current assets, accounts payable, and accrued liabilities approximate their current fair value because of their nature and relatively short maturity dates or durations.

Assets and Liabilities Recorded at Fair Value on a Non-Recurring Basis. The fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business acquisition are measured at the date of acquisition, and goodwill and other long-lived assets when they are held for sale or determined to be impaired. See Note 3 for fair value measurements of certain assets and liabilities recorded at fair value on a non-recurring basis.

v3.8.0.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]  
Goodwill and Intangible Assets

5. Goodwill and Intangible Assets

The change in carrying amount of goodwill for the three months ended March 31, 2018 was as follows (in thousands):

 

Goodwill as of December 31, 2017

   $ 8,750  

Goodwill recorded in connection with acquisition

     1,104  

Effects of foreign currency translation

     13  
  

 

 

 

Goodwill as of March 31, 2018

   $ 9,867  
  

 

 

 

Intangible assets consisted of the following (in thousands, except years):

 

     As of March 31, 2018  
     Weighted
Average Useful
Life in Years
     Gross Carrying
Value
     Accumulated
Amortization
     Net Carrying
Value
 

Customer Relationships

     6.9      $ 3,411      $ (75    $ 3,336  

Completed Technology

     5.7        9,180        (1,660      7,520  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
      $ 12,591      $ (1,735    $ 10,856  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     As of December 31, 2017  
     Average Useful
Life in Years
     Gross Carrying
Value
     Accumulated
Amortization
     Net Carrying
Value
 

Customer Relationships

     2.0      $ 40      $ (12    $ 28  

Completed Technology

     5.7        9,180        (1,213      7,967  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
      $ 9,220      $ (1,225    $ 7,995  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

We classified intangible asset amortization expense in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss as follows (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Cost of revenue

   $ 446      $ 65  

Sales and marketing

     63        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 509      $ 65  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table presents our estimates of remaining amortization expense for finite-lived intangible assets at March 31, 2018 (in thousands):

 

Remainder of 2018

   $ 1,740  

2019

     2,298  

2020

     1,985  

2021

     1,774  

2022

     1,228  

Thereafter

     1,831  
  

 

 

 

Total amortization expense

   $ 10,856  
  

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Equity Awards
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Disclosure of Compensation Related Costs, Share-based Payments [Abstract]  
Equity Awards

6. Equity Awards

Stock Options

Stock option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2018 consisted of the following (in thousands, except weighted-average information):

 

     Options
Outstanding
     Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
 

Options outstanding at December 31, 2017

     5,196      $ 8.70  

Granted

     652        27.33  

Exercised

     (791      4.50  

Cancelled/forfeited

     (92      11.58  
  

 

 

    

Options outstanding at March 31, 2018

     4,965      $ 11.77  
  

 

 

    

As of March 31, 2018, there was $18.0 million of unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested stock options, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 3.1 years.

Restricted Stock Units

RSU activity during the three months ended March 31, 2018 consisted of the following (in thousands, except weighted-average information):

 

     Awards
Outstanding
     Weighted-
Average
Grant Date
Fair Value
 

RSUs outstanding at December 31, 2017

     464      $ 16.81  

Granted

     743        31.97  

Vested

     (68      15.50  

Cancelled/forfeited

     (27      19.35  
  

 

 

    

RSUs outstanding at March 31, 2018

     1,112      $ 26.96  
  

 

 

    

As of March 31, 2018, total unrecognized compensation expense related to unvested RSUs was approximately $27.3 million, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 3.7 years.

 

We classified stock-based compensation expense in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss as follows (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
     March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Cost of revenue

   $ 139      $ 121  

Research and development

     1,233        236  

Sales and marketing

     1,157        659  

General and administrative

     1,260        926  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,789      $ 1,942  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Commitments and Contingencies
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Commitments and Contingencies Disclosure [Abstract]  
Commitments and Contingencies

7. Commitments and Contingencies

Leases

We have various non-cancelable operating leases for our offices. These leases expire at various times through 2025. Certain lease agreements contain renewal options, rent abatement, and escalation clauses.

Indemnification

In the ordinary course of business, we enter into agreements in which we may agree to indemnify other parties with respect to certain matters, including losses resulting from claims of intellectual property infringement, damages to property or persons, business losses, or other liabilities. In addition, we have entered into indemnification agreements with our directors, executive officers, and certain other employees that will require us to indemnify them against liabilities that may arise by reason of their status or service as directors, officers, or employees. The term of these indemnification agreements with our directors, executive officers, and other employees, are generally perpetual after execution of the agreement. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification provisions is unlimited; however, we maintain insurance that reduces our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, we have not accrued a liability for these indemnification provisions because the likelihood of incurring a payment obligation, if any, in connection with these arrangements is not probable or reasonably estimable.

Litigation

From time to time, we may be involved in lawsuits, claims, investigations, and proceedings, consisting of intellectual property, commercial, employment, and other matters, which arise in the ordinary course of business. Other than the matters described below, we are not currently party to any material legal proceedings or claims, nor are we aware of any pending or threatened legal proceedings or claims that could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, cash flows, or financial condition should such legal proceedings or claims be resolved unfavorably.

On December 19, 2017, we disclosed that individuals with an Amazon Web Services, or AWS, login could have had access to a third-party marketing dataset that provided consumer marketing information intended to help marketing professionals advertise and sell their products, or the AWS Matter. This dataset is commercially available and provides some location information, contact information and other estimated information that is used for marketing purposes. It does not include names, credit card numbers, social security numbers, bank account information or passwords.

To date, four putative consumer class action lawsuits have been filed against us in U.S. federal courts relating to the AWS Matter: (1) Kacur v. Alteryx, Inc., Case No. 8:17-cv-2222 (CD Cal) (asserting claims for putative national class and Ohio subclass); (2) Jackson v. Alteryx, Inc., Case No. 3:17-cv-02021 (D. Or.) (asserting claims for putative Oregon class); (3) Foskaris v. Alteryx, Inc., Case No. 2:17-cv-03088 (D. Nev.) (asserting claims for putative national class and Nevada subclass); and (4) Ruderman et al. v. Alteryx, Inc., Case No. 8:18-cv-00022 (C.D. Cal.) (asserting claims for putative national class and Florida, New Jersey, and New York subclasses). Three actions were filed on December 20, 2017 (Kacur, Jackson, Foskaris), and the fourth was filed on January 8, 2018 (Ruderman). The plaintiffs in these cases, who purport to represent various classes of individuals whose information was contained within the dataset, claim to have been harmed or to be facing harm as a result of the exposure of their personal information. The complaints assert claims for violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 U.S.C. §§ 1681 et seq. and state consumer-protection statutes, as well as claims for common-law negligence. Additional actions alleging similar claims could be brought in the future. These proceedings all remain in the early stages. We intend to vigorously defend against these claims. Because of the early stages of these matters, we are unable to estimate a reasonably possible range of loss, if any, that may result for these matters.

v3.8.0.1
Income Taxes
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]  
Income Taxes

8. Income Taxes

The following table presents details of the provision for income taxes and our effective tax rates (in thousands except percentages):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018     2017  

Provision for income taxes

   $ 106     $ 150  

Effective tax rate

     2.1     2.7

We account for income taxes according to ASC 740, Income Taxes, which, among other things, requires that we estimate our annual effective income tax rate for the full year and apply it to pre-tax income (loss) to each interim period, taking into account year-to-date amounts and projected results for the full year. The provision for income taxes consists of federal, foreign, state, and local income taxes. Our effective tax rate differs from the statutory U.S. income tax rate due to the effect of state and local income taxes, differing tax rates imposed on income earned in foreign jurisdictions and in the United States, losses in foreign jurisdictions, certain nondeductible expenses, and the changes in valuation allowances against our deferred tax assets. Our effective tax rate could change significantly from quarter to quarter because of recurring and nonrecurring factors. On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, or the Tax Act, became law. As of December 31, 2017, the Company had completed its accounting for the income tax effects of the Tax Act.

We evaluate whether to record a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets by considering all available positive and negative evidence, using a “more likely than not” realization standard, including our cumulative losses, and the amount and timing of future taxable income. Based on our review, we will continue to maintain a full valuation allowance against our U.S. deferred tax assets.

Neither we nor any of our subsidiaries are currently under examination from tax authorities in the jurisdictions in which we do business.

v3.8.0.1
Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Earnings Per Share [Abstract]  
Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share

9. Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share

Diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders adjusts basic net loss per share for the potentially dilutive impact of stock options and convertible preferred stock. As we have reported losses attributable to common stockholders for all periods presented, all potentially dilutive securities are antidilutive and accordingly, basic net loss per share equals diluted net loss per share. Basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders for Class A and Class B common stock were the same because they were entitled to the same liquidation and dividend rights.

The following weighted-average equivalent shares of common stock were excluded from the diluted net loss per share calculation because their inclusion would have been anti-dilutive (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Options to purchase common stock

     5,477        6,170  

Unvested restricted stock units

     794        379  

Conversion of convertible preferred stock

     —          13,345  

Contingently issuable shares

     21        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total shares excluded from net loss per share

     6,292        19,894  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Segment and Geographic Information
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Segment Reporting [Abstract]  
Segment and Geographic Information

10. Segment and Geographic Information

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise for which separate financial information is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker, or CODM, who is our chief executive officer, in deciding how to allocate resources and assess our financial and operational performance. Our CODM evaluates our financial information and resources and assesses the performance of these resources on a consolidated and aggregated basis. As a result, we have determined that our business operates in a single operating segment.

Our operations outside the United States include sales offices in Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Singapore, and the United Kingdom, and a research and development center in Ukraine. Revenue by location is determined by the billing address of the customer. The following sets forth our revenue by geographic region (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018      2017  

United States

   $ 31,421      $ 22,596  

International

     11,400        5,949  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 42,821      $ 28,545  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Revenue attributable to the United Kingdom comprised 10.8% and 9.0% of total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Other than the United Kingdom, no other countries outside the United States comprised more than 10% of revenue for any of the periods presented.

v3.8.0.1
Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Fair Value Disclosures [Abstract]  
Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from these estimates and assumptions.

On an ongoing basis, our management evaluates estimates and assumptions based on historical data and experience, as well as various other factors that our management believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities.

Variable Interest Entities

Variable Interest Entities

In accordance with ASC 810, Consolidation, the applicable accounting guidance for the consolidation of variable interest entities, or VIEs, we analyze our interests to determine if such interests are variable interests. If variable interests are identified, then the related entity is assessed to determine if it is a VIE. VIEs are generally entities that have either a total equity investment that is insufficient to permit the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support, or whose equity investors lack the characteristics of a controlling financial interest (i.e., ability to make significant decisions through voting rights and a right to receive the expected residual returns of the entity or an obligation to absorb the expected losses of the entity). If we determine that the entity is a VIE, we then assess if we must consolidate the VIE. We deem ourselves to be the primary beneficiary if we have both (i) the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance, and (ii) an obligation to absorb losses of the entity that could potentially be significant to the VIE, or a right to receive benefits from the entity that could be significant to the VIE.

 

As of December 31, 2017 and March 31, 2018, we determined that two and one of our distributors were VIEs under the guidance of ASC 810, Consolidation, respectively. These determinations were due to (i) our participation in the design of the distributor’s legal entity, (ii) our having a variable interest in the distributor, and (iii) our having the right to residual returns. We determined that we were not the primary beneficiary of these VIEs because we did not have (a) the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the VIE’s economic performance, and (b) the obligation to absorb losses of the VIE or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant. Therefore, we did not consolidate any assets or liabilities of these VIE’s in our consolidated balance sheets or record the results of these distributors in our consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss. Transactions with the VIEs were accounted for in the same manner as our other distributors and resellers. As of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, we had no exposure to losses from the contractual relationships with these VIEs or commitments to fund these VIEs. During the three months ended March 31, 2018, we acquired 100% of the outstanding equity of one of our VIEs. Our condensed consolidated financial statements include the assets and liabilities and the results of operations of the acquired company commencing as of the acquisition date. See Note 3 for additional information.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

Under the Jumpstart our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act, we meet the definition of an emerging growth company, or EGC. We have elected to use this extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards pursuant to Section 107(b) of the JOBS Act.

In October 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, 2016-16, Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory. This guidance removes the prohibition in ASC 740, Income Taxes, against the immediate recognition of the current and deferred income tax effects of intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory. This guidance is intended to reduce the complexity of U.S. GAAP and diversity in practice related to the tax consequences of certain types of intra-entity asset transfers, particularly those involving intellectual property. The impact of adoption is recorded using the modified retrospective transition basis through a cumulative-effect adjustment to accumulated deficit as of the beginning of the period of adoption. We early adopted ASU 2016-16 on January 1, 2018, resulting in the elimination of $1.4 million of deferred tax charges included in other assets in our consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2017. We recorded the elimination of the deferred charge to accumulated deficit as of January 1, 2018.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, or ASU 2016-09, which simplifies several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions and related tax impacts, the classification of excess tax benefits on the statement of cash flows, statutory tax withholding requirements, and other stock-based compensation classification matters. We adopted ASU 2016-09 on January 1, 2018. Upon adoption, we recognized $2.4 million of previously unrecognized excess tax benefits related to stock awards using the modified retrospective transition method. We recorded the recognized excess tax benefits as a deferred tax asset, which was then fully offset by our U.S. federal and state deferred tax asset valuation allowance resulting in no impact to our accumulated deficit. Immediately prior to adoption, we had no unrecognized excess tax benefits related to stock awards in jurisdictions outside the United States. All future excess tax benefits resulting from the settlement of stock awards will be recorded to income tax expense. Additionally, upon adoption, we changed our accounting policy to account for forfeitures when they occur rather than estimate a forfeiture rate, the result of which was recorded using the modified retrospective transition basis through a cumulative-effect adjustment to accumulated deficit and additional paid-in-capital of $0.1 million as of January 1, 2018.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which simplifies the subsequent measurement of goodwill by removing the requirement to perform a hypothetical purchase price allocation to compute the implied fair value of goodwill to measure impairment. Instead, any goodwill impairment will equal the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. Further, the guidance eliminates the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative assessment and, if it fails that qualitative test, to perform Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. For public companies, this guidance is effective for annual or any interim goodwill impairment test in annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for any annual or interim goodwill impairment test in annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption is permitted and will be applied to any acquisitions after adoption on a prospective basis. While we continue to assess the potential impact of the adoption of this guidance, we do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Clarifying the Definition of a Business, which narrows the application of when an integrated set of assets and activities is considered a business and provides a framework to assist entities in evaluating whether both an input and a substantive process are present to be considered a business. It is expected that the new guidance will reduce the number of transactions that would need to be further evaluated and accounted for as a business. For public companies, this guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted and will be applied on a prospective basis. We are evaluating the potential impact of adopting this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Restricted Cash, which requires that restricted cash be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning and ending total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. For public companies, this guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and should be applied using a retrospective transition method to each period presented. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. We have not yet determined the timing of adoption. We currently present changes in restricted cash within investing activities and so the adoption of this guidance will result in changes in net cash flows from investing activities and to certain beginning and ending cash and cash equivalent totals shown on our consolidated statement of cash flows.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments, which addresses eight specific cash flow issues with the objective of reducing the existing diversity in practice, including presentation of cash flows relating to contingent consideration payments, proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, and debt prepayment or debt extinguishment costs, among other matters. For public companies, this guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If adopted in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. Adoption of this guidance is required to be applied using a retrospective transition method to each period presented, unless impracticable to do so. We are currently evaluating the potential impact of this guidance on our consolidated statement of cash flows.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases, creating Topic 842, which requires lessees to record the assets and liabilities arising from all leases in the statement of financial position. Under ASU 2016-02, lessees will recognize a liability for lease payments and a right-of-use asset. When measuring assets and liabilities, a lessee should include amounts related to option terms, such as the option of extending or terminating the lease or purchasing the underlying asset, that are reasonably certain to be exercised. For leases with a term of 12 months or less, lessees are permitted to make an accounting policy election to not recognize lease assets and liabilities. This guidance retains the distinction between finance leases and operating leases and the classification criteria remains similar. For financing leases, a lessee will recognize the interest on a lease liability separate from amortization of the right-of-use asset. In addition, repayments of principal will be presented within financing activities, and interest payments will be presented within operating activities in the statement of cash flows. For operating leases, a lessee will recognize a single lease cost on a straight-line basis and classify all cash payments within operating activities in the statement of cash flows. For public companies, this guidance will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and is required to be applied using a modified retrospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. We are evaluating the potential impact of this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. This guidance replaces most existing revenue recognition guidance. It provides principles for recognizing revenue for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers with the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, which deferred the effective date of ASU 2014-09 by one year. During 2016 and 2017, the FASB continued to issue additional amendments to this new revenue guidance. For public companies, this new revenue guidance will be effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For as long as we remain an EGC, the new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim reporting periods within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. We are evaluating the potential impact of this guidance on our consolidated financial statements.

Fair Value Measurements

 Fair Value Measurements

We utilize valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs to the extent possible. We determine fair value based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability in the principal or most advantageous market. When considering market participant assumptions in fair value measurements, the following fair value hierarchy distinguishes between observable and unobservable inputs, which are categorized in one of the following levels:

 

           Level 1    Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities at the measurement date.
  Level 2    Inputs other than Level 1 that are observable, either directly or indirectly, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active near the measurement date; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.
  Level 3    Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

The fair value of our money market funds was determined based on “Level 1” inputs.

 

The fair value of commercial paper, certificates of deposit, U.S. Treasury and agency bonds, and corporate bonds were determined based on “Level 2” inputs. The valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of commercial paper and certificates of deposit included observable market-based inputs for similar assets, which primarily include yield curves and time-to-maturity factors. The valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of U.S. Treasury and agency bonds and corporate bonds included standard observable inputs, including reported trades, quoted market prices, matrix pricing, benchmark yields, broker/dealer quotes, issuer spreads, two-sided markets or benchmark securities and data provided by third parties as many of the bonds are not actively traded.

There were no marketable securities measured on a recurring basis in the “Level 3” category.

We have not elected the fair value option as prescribed by ASC 825, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, for our financial assets and liabilities that are not otherwise required to be carried at fair value. Under ASC 820, material financial assets and liabilities not carried at fair value, such as our accounts receivable and payables, are reported at their carrying values.

Income Taxes

We account for income taxes according to ASC 740, Income Taxes, which, among other things, requires that we estimate our annual effective income tax rate for the full year and apply it to pre-tax income (loss) to each interim period, taking into account year-to-date amounts and projected results for the full year. The provision for income taxes consists of federal, foreign, state, and local income taxes. Our effective tax rate differs from the statutory U.S. income tax rate due to the effect of state and local income taxes, differing tax rates imposed on income earned in foreign jurisdictions and in the United States, losses in foreign jurisdictions, certain nondeductible expenses, and the changes in valuation allowances against our deferred tax assets. Our effective tax rate could change significantly from quarter to quarter because of recurring and nonrecurring factors. On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, or the Tax Act, became law. As of December 31, 2017, the Company had completed its accounting for the income tax effects of the Tax Act.

We evaluate whether to record a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets by considering all available positive and negative evidence, using a “more likely than not” realization standard, including our cumulative losses, and the amount and timing of future taxable income. Based on our review, we will continue to maintain a full valuation allowance against our U.S. deferred tax assets.

Neither we nor any of our subsidiaries are currently under examination from tax authorities in the jurisdictions in which we do business.

Segment and Geographic Information

Segment and Geographic Information

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise for which separate financial information is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker, or CODM, who is our chief executive officer, in deciding how to allocate resources and assess our financial and operational performance. Our CODM evaluates our financial information and resources and assesses the performance of these resources on a consolidated and aggregated basis. As a result, we have determined that our business operates in a single operating segment.

v3.8.0.1
Fair Value Measurements (Tables)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Fair Value Disclosures [Abstract]  
Summary of Cash and Cash Equivalents and Investments' Costs, Gross Unrealized Gains (Losses), and Fair Value by Major Security Type Recorded as Cash and Cash Equivalents or Short-Term or Long-Term Investments

The following tables present our cash and cash equivalents and investments’ costs, gross unrealized losses, and fair value by major security type recorded as cash and cash equivalents or short-term or long-term investments as of March 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017 (in thousands):

 

     As of March 31, 2018  
     Cost      Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Fair Value      Cash and
Cash
Equivalents
     Short-term
Investments
     Long-term
Investments
 

Cash

   $ 37,302      $ —       $ 37,302      $ 37,302      $ —        $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 1:

                

Money market funds

     11,082        —         11,082        11,082        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     11,082        —         11,082        11,082        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 2:

                

Commercial paper

     3,495        —         3,495        2,749        746        —    

Certificates of deposit

     4,052        —         4,052        —          1,500        2,552  

U.S. Treasury and agency bonds

     103,537        (266     103,271        7,944        76,425        18,902  

Corporate bonds

     46,668        (127     46,541        —          41,139        5,402  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     157,752        (393     157,359        10,693        119,810        26,856  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 3

     —          —         —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 206,136      $ (393   $ 205,743      $ 59,077      $ 119,810      $ 26,856  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     As of December 31, 2017  
     Cost      Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Fair Value      Cash and
Cash
Equivalents
     Short-term
Investments
     Long-term
Investments
 

Cash

   $ 100,651      $ —       $ 100,651      $ 100,651      $ —        $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 1:

                

Money market funds

     19,065        —         19,065        19,065        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     19,065        —         19,065        19,065        —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 2:

                

U.S. Treasury and agency bonds

     44,968        (176     44,792        —          25,923        18,869  

Corporate bonds

     29,608        (50     29,558        —          28,463        1,095  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     74,576        (226     74,350        —          54,386        19,964  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Level 3

     —          —         —          —          —          —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 194,292      $ (226   $ 194,066      $ 119,716      $ 54,386      $ 19,964  
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

Reconciliation of Beginning and Ending Balances of Acquisition-Related Accrued Contingent Consideration

The following table presents a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances of acquisition-related accrued contingent consideration using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017 (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Beginning balance

   $ 975      $ —    

Obligations assumed

     1,200        1,160  

Change in fair value

     293        —    

Settlement

     (656      —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 1,812      $ 1,160  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets (Tables)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]  
Schedule of Change in Carrying Amount of Goodwill

The change in carrying amount of goodwill for the three months ended March 31, 2018 was as follows (in thousands):

 

Goodwill as of December 31, 2017

   $ 8,750  

Goodwill recorded in connection with acquisition

     1,104  

Effects of foreign currency translation

     13  
  

 

 

 

Goodwill as of March 31, 2018

   $ 9,867  
  

 

 

 
Schedule of Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consisted of the following (in thousands, except years):

 

     As of March 31, 2018  
     Weighted
Average Useful
Life in Years
     Gross Carrying
Value
     Accumulated
Amortization
     Net Carrying
Value
 

Customer Relationships

     6.9      $ 3,411      $ (75    $ 3,336  

Completed Technology

     5.7        9,180        (1,660      7,520  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
      $ 12,591      $ (1,735    $ 10,856  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     As of December 31, 2017  
     Average Useful
Life in Years
     Gross Carrying
Value
     Accumulated
Amortization
     Net Carrying
Value
 

Customer Relationships

     2.0      $ 40      $ (12    $ 28  

Completed Technology

     5.7        9,180        (1,213      7,967  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
      $ 9,220      $ (1,225    $ 7,995  
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
Schedule of Intangible Asset Amortization Expense

We classified intangible asset amortization expense in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss as follows (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Cost of revenue

   $ 446      $ 65  

Sales and marketing

     63        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 509      $ 65  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
Schedule of Finite-Lived Intangible Assets Estimated Remaining Amortization Expense

The following table presents our estimates of remaining amortization expense for finite-lived intangible assets at March 31, 2018 (in thousands):

 

Remainder of 2018

   $ 1,740  

2019

     2,298  

2020

     1,985  

2021

     1,774  

2022

     1,228  

Thereafter

     1,831  
  

 

 

 

Total amortization expense

   $ 10,856  
  

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Equity Awards (Tables)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Disclosure of Compensation Related Costs, Share-based Payments [Abstract]  
Schedule of Stock Option Activity

Stock option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2018 consisted of the following (in thousands, except weighted-average information):

 

     Options
Outstanding
     Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
 

Options outstanding at December 31, 2017

     5,196      $ 8.70  

Granted

     652        27.33  

Exercised

     (791      4.50  

Cancelled/forfeited

     (92      11.58  
  

 

 

    

Options outstanding at March 31, 2018

     4,965      $ 11.77  
  

 

 

    
Schedule of RSU Activity

RSU activity during the three months ended March 31, 2018 consisted of the following (in thousands, except weighted-average information):

 

     Awards
Outstanding
     Weighted-
Average
Grant Date
Fair Value
 

RSUs outstanding at December 31, 2017

     464      $ 16.81  

Granted

     743        31.97  

Vested

     (68      15.50  

Cancelled/forfeited

     (27      19.35  
  

 

 

    

RSUs outstanding at March 31, 2018

     1,112      $ 26.96  
  

 

 

    
Schedule of Stock-based Compensation Expense

We classified stock-based compensation expense in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss as follows (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
     March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Cost of revenue

   $ 139      $ 121  

Research and development

     1,233        236  

Sales and marketing

     1,157        659  

General and administrative

     1,260        926  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,789      $ 1,942  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Income Taxes (Tables)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]  
Schedule of Provision for Income Taxes and Effective Tax Rates

The following table presents details of the provision for income taxes and our effective tax rates (in thousands except percentages):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018     2017  

Provision for income taxes

   $ 106     $ 150  

Effective tax rate

     2.1     2.7
v3.8.0.1
Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share (Tables)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Earnings Per Share [Abstract]  
Schedule of Anti-dilutive Securities Excluded from Computation of Diluted Net Loss Per Share

The following weighted-average equivalent shares of common stock were excluded from the diluted net loss per share calculation because their inclusion would have been anti-dilutive (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018      2017  

Options to purchase common stock

     5,477        6,170  

Unvested restricted stock units

     794        379  

Conversion of convertible preferred stock

     —          13,345  

Contingently issuable shares

     21        —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total shares excluded from net loss per share

     6,292        19,894  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Segment and Geographic Information (Tables)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Segment Reporting [Abstract]  
Schedule of Revenue by Geographic Region

The following sets forth our revenue by geographic region (in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended  
   March 31,  
     2018      2017  

United States

   $ 31,421      $ 22,596  

International

     11,400        5,949  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 42,821      $ 28,545  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
v3.8.0.1
Significant Accounting Policies - Additional Information (Detail) - USD ($)
Jan. 01, 2018
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Foreign Tax Authority [Member]      
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]      
Unrecognized tax benefits     $ 0
ASU 2016-16 [Member]      
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]      
Elimination of deferred tax charges $ (1,400,000)    
Increase in accumulated deficit and additional paid-in-capital 1,400,000    
ASU 2016-09 [Member]      
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]      
Increase in accumulated deficit and additional paid-in-capital 100,000    
Unrecognized tax benefits 2,400,000    
Valuation allowance deferred tax asset change in amount $ 2,400,000    
Alteryx ANZ Pty Limited [Member]      
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]      
Business combination acquired percentage   100.00%  
v3.8.0.1
Business Combinations - Additional Information (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
1 Months Ended
Feb. 28, 2018
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Jan. 31, 2017
Business Acquisition [Line Items]        
Goodwill   $ 9,867 $ 8,750  
Alteryx ANZ Pty Limited [Member]        
Business Acquisition [Line Items]        
Business combination acquired percentage 100.00%      
Total consideration $ 4,800      
Business combination, purchase price in cash 3,300      
Contingent consideration paid in cash 1,200      
Settlement of preexisting relationships 300      
Purchase price allocation, assets acquired and liabilities assumed, Net 300      
Goodwill 1,100      
Contingent earn-out consideration $ 1,500      
Contingent earn-out consideration payment period 2 years      
Alteryx ANZ Pty Limited [Member] | Customer-Related Intangible Assets [Member] | Level 3 [Member]        
Business Acquisition [Line Items]        
Fair value of completed technology $ 3,400      
Weighted average amortization period 7 years      
Alteryx ANZ Pty Limited [Member] | Customer Contracts And Relationships [Member]        
Business Acquisition [Line Items]        
Completed technology intangible assets $ 3,400      
Semanta, s.r.o [Member]        
Business Acquisition [Line Items]        
Business combination acquired percentage       100.00%
Purchase price allocation, assets acquired and liabilities assumed, Net       $ (400)
Completed technology intangible assets       3,100
Goodwill       2,900
Total purchase consideration       $ 5,600
v3.8.0.1
Fair Value Measurements - Summary of Cash and Cash Equivalents and Investments' Costs, Gross Unrealized Losses, and Fair Value by Major Security Type Recorded as Cash and Cash Equivalents or Short-Term or Long-Term Investments (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Short-term investments $ 119,810 $ 54,386
Long-term investments 26,856 19,964
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 206,136 194,292
Gross Unrealized Gains (Losses) (393) (226)
Fair Value 205,743 194,066
Cash and Cash Equivalents 59,077 119,716
Short-term investments 119,810 54,386
Long-term investments 26,856 19,964
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Cash [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 37,302 100,651
Fair Value 37,302 100,651
Cash and Cash Equivalents 37,302 100,651
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 1 [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 11,082 19,065
Fair Value 11,082 19,065
Cash and Cash Equivalents 11,082 19,065
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 1 [Member] | Money Market Funds [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 11,082 19,065
Fair Value 11,082 19,065
Cash and Cash Equivalents 11,082 19,065
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 2 [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 157,752 74,576
Gross Unrealized Gains (Losses) (393) (226)
Fair Value 157,359 74,350
Cash and Cash Equivalents 10,693  
Short-term investments 119,810 54,386
Long-term investments 26,856 19,964
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 2 [Member] | Certificates of Deposit [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 4,052  
Fair Value 4,052  
Short-term investments 1,500  
Long-term investments 2,552  
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 2 [Member] | Corporate Bonds [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 46,668 29,608
Gross Unrealized Gains (Losses) (127) (50)
Fair Value 46,541 29,558
Short-term investments 41,139 28,463
Long-term investments 5,402 1,095
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 2 [Member] | U.S. Treasury and Agency Bonds [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 103,537 44,968
Gross Unrealized Gains (Losses) (266) (176)
Fair Value 103,271 44,792
Cash and Cash Equivalents 7,944  
Short-term investments 76,425 25,923
Long-term investments 18,902 $ 18,869
Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring [Member] | Level 2 [Member] | Commercial Paper [Member]    
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]    
Cost 3,495  
Fair Value 3,495  
Cash and Cash Equivalents 2,749  
Short-term investments $ 746  
v3.8.0.1
Fair Value Measurements - Additional Information (Detail)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
USD ($)
Security
shares
Dec. 31, 2017
USD ($)
Fair Value Disclosures [Line Items]    
Fair value transfer between Level 1, Level 2 or Level 3 $ 0  
Number of securities in an unrealized loss position for less than 12 months | Security 64  
Fair value of securities in an unrealized loss position for less than 12 months $ 139,600,000  
Gross unrealized losses $ 400,000  
Business acquisition, number of shares issued to Semanta | shares 18,869  
Number of shares held back | shares 5,381  
Domestic Cash and Investments [Member]    
Fair Value Disclosures [Line Items]    
Cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and investments $ 198,100,000 $ 181,300,000
Minimum [Member]    
Fair Value Disclosures [Line Items]    
Long-term investments maturity period 1 year  
Maximum [Member]    
Fair Value Disclosures [Line Items]    
Long-term investments maturity period 2 years  
v3.8.0.1
Fair Value Measurements - Reconciliation of Beginning and Ending Balances of Acquisition-Related Accrued Contingent Consideration (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Mar. 31, 2017
Fair Value Disclosures [Abstract]    
Beginning balance $ 975  
Obligations assumed 1,200 $ 1,160
Change in fair value 293  
Settlement (656)  
Ending balance $ 1,812 $ 1,160
v3.8.0.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets - Schedule of Change in Carrying Amount of Goodwill (Detail)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
USD ($)
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]  
Goodwill beginning balance $ 8,750
Goodwill recorded in connection with acquisition 1,104
Effects of foreign currency translation 13
Goodwill ending balance $ 9,867
v3.8.0.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets - Schedule of Intangible Assets (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]    
Gross Carrying Value $ 12,591 $ 9,220
Accumulated Amortization (1,735) (1,225)
Net Carrying Value $ 10,856 $ 7,995
Customer Relationships [Member]    
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]    
Weighted Average Useful Life in Years 6 years 10 months 25 days 2 years
Gross Carrying Value $ 3,411 $ 40
Accumulated Amortization (75) (12)
Net Carrying Value $ 3,336 $ 28
Completed Technology [Member]    
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]    
Weighted Average Useful Life in Years 5 years 8 months 12 days 5 years 8 months 12 days
Gross Carrying Value $ 9,180 $ 9,180
Accumulated Amortization (1,660) (1,213)
Net Carrying Value $ 7,520 $ 7,967
v3.8.0.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets - Schedule of Intangible Asset Amortization Expense (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Mar. 31, 2017
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]    
Amortization of intangible assets $ 509 $ 65
Cost of Revenue [Member]    
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]    
Amortization of intangible assets 446 $ 65
Sales And Marketing [Member]    
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]    
Amortization of intangible assets $ 63  
v3.8.0.1
Goodwill and Intangible Assets - Schedule of Finite-Lived Intangible Assets Estimated Remaining Amortization Expense (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]    
Remainder of 2018 $ 1,740  
2019 2,298  
2020 1,985  
2021 1,774  
2022 1,228  
Thereafter 1,831  
Net Carrying Value $ 10,856 $ 7,995
v3.8.0.1
Equity Awards - Schedule of Stock Option Activity (Detail)
shares in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
$ / shares
shares
Disclosure of Compensation Related Costs, Share-based Payments [Abstract]  
Options Outstanding, Beginning Balance | shares 5,196
Granted | shares 652
Exercised | shares (791)
Cancelled/forfeited | shares (92)
Options Outstanding, Ending Balance | shares 4,965
Weighted- Average Exercise Price, Beginning Balance | $ / shares $ 8.70
Weighted- Average Exercise Price, Granted | $ / shares 27.33
Weighted- Average Exercise Price, Exercised | $ / shares 4.50
Weighted- Average Exercise Price, Cancelled/forfeited | $ / shares 11.58
Weighted- Average Exercise Price, Ending Balance | $ / shares $ 11.77
v3.8.0.1
Equity Awards - Additional Information (Detail)
$ in Millions
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
USD ($)
Stock Options [Member]  
Unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested stock options $ 18.0
Employee Service Share-based Compensation, Nonvested Awards, Compensation Cost Not yet Recognized, Period for Recognition 3 years 1 month 6 days
Restricted Stock Units [Member]  
Employee Service Share-based Compensation, Nonvested Awards, Compensation Cost Not yet Recognized, Period for Recognition 3 years 8 months 12 days
Unrecognized compensation expense, related to unvested RSUs $ 27.3
v3.8.0.1
Equity Awards - Schedule RSU Activity (Detail) - Restricted Stock Units [Member]
shares in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
$ / shares
shares
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Equity Instruments Other than Options, Nonvested, Number of Shares [Roll Forward]  
Awards Outstanding, Beginning Balance | shares 464
Awards Outstanding, Granted | shares 743
Awards Outstanding, Vested | shares (68)
Awards Outstanding, Cancelled/forfeited | shares (27)
Awards Outstanding, Ending Balance | shares 1,112
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value, Beginning Balance | $ / shares $ 16.81
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value, Granted | $ / shares 31.97
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value, vested | $ / shares 15.50
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value, Cancelled/forfeited | $ / shares 19.35
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value, Ending Balance | $ / shares $ 26.96
v3.8.0.1
Equity Awards - Schedule of Stock-based Compensation Expense (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Mar. 31, 2017
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]    
Stock-based Compensation Expense $ 3,789 $ 1,942
Cost of Revenue [Member]    
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]    
Stock-based Compensation Expense 139 121
Research and Development [Member]    
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]    
Stock-based Compensation Expense 1,233 236
Sales And Marketing [Member]    
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]    
Stock-based Compensation Expense 1,157 659
General and Administrative [Member]    
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]    
Stock-based Compensation Expense $ 1,260 $ 926
v3.8.0.1
Commitments and Contingencies - Additional Information (Detail) - USD ($)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Commitments And Contingencies [Line Items]    
Operating leases Expiration, Year 2025  
Indemnification [Member]    
Commitments And Contingencies [Line Items]    
Accrued liability $ 0 $ 0
v3.8.0.1
Income Taxes - Schedule of Provision for Income Taxes and Effective Tax Rates (Detail) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Mar. 31, 2017
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]    
Provision for income taxes $ 106 $ 150
Effective tax rate 2.10% 2.70%