NOVOCURE LTD, 10-Q filed on 7/26/2018
Quarterly Report
v3.10.0.1
Document and Entity Information - shares
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Jul. 19, 2018
Document Document And Entity Information [Abstract]    
Document Type 10-Q  
Amendment Flag false  
Document Period End Date Jun. 30, 2018  
Document Fiscal Year Focus 2018  
Document Fiscal Period Focus Q2  
Trading Symbol NVCR  
Entity Registrant Name Novocure Ltd  
Entity Central Index Key 0001645113  
Current Fiscal Year End Date --12-31  
Entity Filer Category Large Accelerated Filer  
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding   92,902,560
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Jun. 30, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
CURRENT ASSETS:    
Cash and cash equivalents $ 114,456 $ 78,592
Short-term investments 104,499 104,719
Restricted cash 2,169 2,126
Trade receivables 37,643 29,567
Receivables and prepaid expenses 11,216 8,105
Inventories 19,906 22,025
Total current assets 289,889 245,134
LONG-TERM ASSETS:    
Property and equipment, net 8,891 9,031
Field equipment, net 8,108 9,036
Severance pay fund 111 111
Other long-term assets 2,877 1,986
Total long-term assets 19,987 20,164
TOTAL ASSETS 309,876 265,298
CURRENT LIABILITIES:    
Trade payables 20,434 17,206
Other payables and accrued expenses 24,813 32,996
Total current liabilities 45,247 50,202
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES:    
Long-term loan, net of discount and issuance costs 149,195 97,342
Employee benefit liabilities 2,473 2,453
Other long-term liabilities 880 1,737
Total long-term liabilities 152,548 101,532
TOTAL LIABILITIES 197,795 151,734
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES 0 0
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:    
Ordinary shares no par value, unlimited shares authorized; issued and outstanding: 92,503,273 shares and 89,478,032 shares at June 30, 2018 (unaudited) and December 31, 2017, respectively 0 0
Additional paid-in capital 729,684 697,165
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (1,273) (1,343)
Accumulated deficit (616,330) (582,258)
Total shareholders' equity 112,081 113,564
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY $ 309,876 $ 265,298
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (Parenthetical) - $ / shares
6 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Statement Of Financial Position [Abstract]    
Common stock, par value
Common stock, shares authorized Unlimited Unlimited
Common stock, shares issued 92,503,273 89,478,032
Common stock, shares outstanding 92,503,273 89,478,032
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Dec. 31, 2017
Income Statement [Abstract]          
Net revenues $ 61,514 $ 38,376 $ 113,639 $ 73,256 $ 177,026
Cost of revenues 19,833 13,152 38,071 24,816 55,609
Gross profit 41,681 25,224 75,568 48,440 121,417
Operating costs and expenses:          
Research, development and clinical trials 11,362 9,371 22,466 18,782 38,103
Sales and marketing 19,196 16,360 37,331 31,116 63,528
General and administrative 18,208 15,023 35,533 27,445 59,114
Total operating costs and expenses 48,766 40,754 95,330 77,343 160,745
Operating loss (7,085) (15,530) (19,762) (28,903) (39,328)
Financial expenses, net 2,860 2,183 7,713 4,629 9,169
Loss before income taxes (9,945) (17,713) (27,475) (33,532) (48,497)
Income taxes 5,565 3,461 8,759 5,687 13,165
Net loss $ (15,510) $ (21,174) $ (36,234) $ (39,219) $ (61,662)
Basic and diluted net loss per ordinary share $ (0.17) $ (0.24) $ (0.40) $ (0.45) $ (0.70)
Weighted average number of ordinary shares used in computing basic and diluted net loss per share 91,331,862 88,218,868 90,658,735 87,835,926 88,546,719
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Dec. 31, 2017
Statement Of Income And Comprehensive Income [Abstract]          
Net loss $ (15,510) $ (21,174) $ (36,234) $ (39,219) $ (61,662)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:          
Change in foreign currency translation adjustments 11 1 21 10 8
Pension benefit plan 44 183 49 134 532
Total comprehensive loss $ (15,455) $ (20,990) $ (36,164) $ (39,075) $ (61,122)
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY - 6 months ended Jun. 30, 2018 - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Total
Ordinary Shares
Additional Paid-in Capital
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Accumulated Deficit
Balance at Dec. 31, 2017 $ 113,564   $ 697,165 $ (1,343) $ (582,258)
Balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2017   89,478,032      
Proceeds from issuance of shares 938   938    
Proceeds from issuance of shares (in shares)   54,386      
Share-based compensation to employees 18,726   18,726    
Exercise of options and warrants and vested RSUs 12,855   12,855    
Exercise of options and warrants and vested RSUs (in shares)   2,970,855      
Cumulative effect adjustment on retained earnings [1] 2,162       2,162
Other comprehensive income, net of tax benefit of $8 70     70  
Net loss (36,234)       (36,234)
Balance at Jun. 30, 2018 $ 112,081   $ 729,684 $ (1,273) $ (616,330)
Balance (in shares) at Jun. 30, 2018   92,503,273      
[1] Resulting from the adoption of ASC 606.
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY (Parenthetical)
$ in Thousands
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
USD ($)
Statement Of Stockholders Equity [Abstract]  
Other comprehensive income (loss), tax benefit $ 8
v3.10.0.1
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Dec. 31, 2017
Cash flows from operating activities:          
Net loss $ (15,510) $ (21,174) $ (36,234) $ (39,219) $ (61,662)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization 2,287 1,811 4,490 3,471 7,677
Asset write-downs and impairment of field equipment 93 59 142 134 241
Share-based compensation to employees 10,206 7,570 18,726 12,131 27,116
Increase in trade receivables (3,599) (2,064) (5,271) (7,550) (23,228)
Amortization of discount (370) 103 2,057 209 252
Decrease (increase) in receivables and prepaid expenses (1,277) 3,354 (3,111) (1,461) 1,979
Decrease in inventories 482 803 2,120 403 3,524
Increase in other long-term assets (278) (38) (898) (294) (554)
Increase (decrease) in trade payables 1,016 (1,638) 3,229 (5,195) (1,150)
Increase (decrease) in other payables and accrued expenses (528) 4,888 (8,828) 3,478 14,460
Increase in employee benefit liabilities, net 1 130 77 239 440
Increase (decrease) in other long-term liabilities (16) 321 (816) 870 (2,229)
Net cash used in operating activities (7,493) (5,875) (24,317) (32,784) (33,134)
Cash flows from investing activities:          
Purchase of property and equipment (854) (376) (1,591) (1,406) (2,459)
Purchase of field equipment (604) (859) (1,974) (2,261) (4,907)
Proceeds from maturity of short-term investments 60,000 60,000 105,000 120,000 120,000
Purchase of short-term investments (59,384) (59,352) (104,134) (104,006) (104,006)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities (842) (587) (2,699) 12,327 8,628
Cash flows from financing activities:          
Proceeds from issuance of shares, net 938 781 938 781 1,540
Proceeds from long-term loan, net     149,150    
Proceeds from other long-term loans   19   19 19
Repayment of long-term loan     (100,000)    
Repayment of other long-term loan (24) (19) (41) (37) (76)
Exercise of options and warrants 10,274 1,286 12,855 1,363 3,685
Net cash provided by financing activities 11,188 2,067 62,902 2,126 5,168
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents 11 (1) 21 10 8
Increase (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash 2,864 (4,396) 35,907 (18,321) (19,330)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period 113,761 86,123 80,718 100,048 100,048
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at the end of the period 116,625 81,727 116,625 81,727 80,718
Cash paid during the period for:          
Income taxes 8,256 1,500 12,014 4,902 10,286
Interest $ 3,416 $ 2,533 $ 6,425 $ 5,041 $ 10,162
v3.10.0.1
Organization and Basis of Presentation
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Organization Consolidation And Presentation Of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Organization and Basis of Presentation

 

NOTE 1: ORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Organization.  NovoCure Limited (including its consolidated subsidiaries, the “Company”) was incorporated in the Bailiwick of Jersey and is principally engaged in the development, manufacture and commercialization of Tumor Treating Fields for the treatment of solid tumors. The Company has regulatory approvals and clearances in certain countries for Optune, its first Tumor Treating Fields delivery system, to treat adult patients with glioblastoma (“GBM”).   

Financial statement preparation. The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries, and intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments, which are normal and recurring in nature, necessary for fair financial statement presentation. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in these consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. These consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes should be read in conjunction with the Company’s annual consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017 (the “2017 10-K”) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on February 22, 2018.

The significant accounting policies applied in the audited annual consolidated financial statements of the Company as disclosed in the 2017 10-K are applied consistently in these unaudited interim consolidated financial statements, except as noted below:

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements. In May 2014, FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (ASU 2014-09), an updated standard on revenue recognition and issued subsequent amendments to the initial guidance in March 2016, April 2016, May 2016 and December 2016 within ASU 2016-08, 2016-10, 2016-12 and 2016-20, respectively (collectively, “ASC 606”). The core principle of the new standard is for companies to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods and services to patients in amounts that reflect the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. In addition, the new standard requires expanded disclosures. The Company has adopted the standard effective January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method for all contracts. The reported results for 2018 reflect the application of ASC 606 guidance while the reported results for 2017 were prepared under the guidance of ASC 605, Revenue Recognition (ASC 605). The amount of revenue recognized in 2018 reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled to receive in exchange for Optune.

In preparation for adoption of the standard, the Company has implemented internal controls and key system functionality to enable the preparation of financial information, including the assessment of the impact of the standard.  The Company uses the portfolio approach to apply the standard to portfolios of contracts with similar characteristics. Adoption of the standard resulted in an increase to trade receivables of $2,807, deferred revenues of $645 and a cumulative impact to the Company's accumulated deficit as of January 1, 2018 of $2,162.

Optune is comprised of two main components: (1) an electric field generator and (2) transducer arrays and related accessories. We retain title to the electric field generator, and the patient is provided replacement transducer arrays and technical support for the device during the term of treatment. The electric field generator and transducer arrays are always supplied and function together and are not sold on a standalone basis.

To recognize revenue under ASC 606, the Company applies the following five steps:    

1. Identify the contract with a patient.   A contract with a patient exists when (i) the Company enters into an enforceable contract with a patient that defines each party’s rights regarding delivery of and payment for Optune, (ii) the contract has commercial substance and (iii) the Company determines that collection of substantially all consideration for Optune is probable based on the payer’s intent and ability to pay the promised consideration. The evidence of a contract generally consists of a prescription, a patient service agreement and the verification of the assigned payer for the contract and intention to collect.

2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract.  Optune contracts include the lease of the device, the supply obligation of disposable transducer arrays and technical support for the term of treatment. To the extent a contract includes multiple promised products and/or services, the Company must apply judgment to determine whether those products and/or services are capable of being distinct in the context of the contract. If these criteria are not met the promised products and/or services are accounted for as a combined performance obligation. In the Company’s case, Optune’s device, support, and disposables are provided as one inseparable package of monthly treatment for a single monthly fee.

3. Determine the transaction price.   The transaction price is determined based on the consideration to which the Company will be entitled in exchange for providing Optune to the patient. To the extent the transaction price includes variable consideration, the Company estimates the amount of variable consideration that should be included in the transaction price utilizing either the expected value method or the most likely amount method depending on the nature of the variable consideration. Variable consideration is included in the transaction price if, in the Company’s judgment, it is probable that a significant future reversal of cumulative revenue under the contract will not occur. The Company has agreements with many payers that define explicit discounts off the gross transaction price. In addition to the explicit discounts negotiated with each payer, the Company expects to receive, in aggregate for a given portfolio, less than the gross revenue net of explicit discounts. ASC 606 requires that the Company recognize this variable consideration as an implicit discount in the billing period. The implicit discount includes both an estimate of claims that will pay at an amount less than billed and an estimate of claims that will not pay within a given time horizon. The implicit discount adjustments to the transaction price are due to concessions, not collectability concerns driven by payer credit risk.

4. Allocate the transaction price to performance obligations in the contract.  If a contract contains a single performance obligation, the entire transaction price is allocated to the single performance obligation. As discussed above, there is one performance obligation under the Company’s contracts and, therefore, the monthly transaction price determined for the performance obligation will be recognized over time ratably over the monthly term of the treatment.     

5. Recognize revenue when or as the Company satisfies a performance obligation.   The Company satisfies performance obligations over time as discussed above. Revenue is recognized at the time the related performance obligation is satisfied by transferring a promised service to a patient. The patient consumes the benefits of Optune treatment on a daily basis over the monthly term. As this criterion is met, the revenues will be recognized over the monthly term.

In accordance with ASC 606, the impact of our adoption of ASC 606 on our condensed consolidated statements of income for the six and three months ended June 30, 2018 were a decrease in net revenues of $5,531 and $1,993, respectively, an increase in net loss of $5,371 and $2,035, respectively, and a decrease in our basic and diluted net loss per ordinary share of $0.06 and $0.02, respectively.  The impact of our adoption of Topic 606 on our balance sheet as of June 30, 2018 was a decrease in trade receivables of $2,760, an increase to other payables and accrued expenses (deferred revenues net of tax provision) of $521 and an accumulated deficit as of June 30, 2018 of $3,209.

In August 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments. ASU 2016-15 eliminates the diversity in practice related to the classification of certain cash receipts and payments for debt prepayment or extinguishment costs, the maturing of a zero coupon bond, the settlement of contingent liabilities arising from a business combination, proceeds from insurance settlements, distributions from certain equity method investees and beneficial interests obtained in a financial asset securitization. ASU 2016-15 designates the appropriate cash flow classification, including requirements to allocate certain components of these cash receipts and payments among operating, investing and financing activities. The retrospective transition method, requiring adjustment to all comparative periods presented, is required unless it is impracticable for some of the amendments, in which case those amendments would be prospectively as of the earliest date practicable. The Company adopted the standard effective as of January 1, 2018, and the adoption of this standard did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash.  This standard requires the presentation of the statement of cash flows to show the changes in the total of cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents. The standard is effective for fiscal years and the interim periods within those fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company adopted the standard retrospectively to all periods presented effective as of January 1, 2018.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements. In February 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-02-Leases (ASC 842), which sets out the principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases for both parties to a contract (i.e. lessees and lessors). The new standard requires lessees to apply a dual approach, classifying leases as either finance or operating leases based on the principle of whether or not the lease is effectively a financed purchase by the lessee. This classification will determine whether lease expense is recognized based on an effective interest method or on a straight line basis over the term of the lease, respectively. A lessee is also required to record a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with a term of greater than twelve months regardless of their classification. Leases with a term of twelve months or less will be accounted for similar to existing guidance for operating leases. The new standard requires lessors to account for leases using an approach that is substantially equivalent to existing guidance for sales-type leases, direct financing leases and operating leases. ASC 842 supersedes the previous leases standard, ASC 840. The standard is effective on January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company currently anticipates adopting the new standard effective January 1, 2019 and is evaluating the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In June 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. ASU 2016-13 amends the impairment model to utilize an expected loss methodology in place of the currently used incurred loss methodology, which will result in the more timely recognition of losses. ASU 2016-13 also applies to employee benefit plan accounting, with an effective date of the first quarter of fiscal 2020. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 31, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements, footnote disclosures and employee benefit plans’ accounting.

In June 2018, FASB issued ASU 2018-07 to expand the scope of ASC Topic 718, Compensation - Stock Compensation, to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. The pronouncement is effective for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company is evaluating the effects of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

 

v3.10.0.1
Short-Term Investments
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Debt Securities Current [Abstract]  
Short-Term Investments

NOTE 2: SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS

The Company invests in marketable U.S. Treasury Bills (“T-bills”) that are classified as held-to-maturity securities. The amortized cost and recorded basis of the T-bills are presented as short-term investments in the amount of $104,499 and $104,719 as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, respectively, and their estimated fair value as of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 was $104,512 and $104,655, respectively.

v3.10.0.1
Inventories
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Inventory Disclosure [Abstract]  
Inventories

NOTE 3: INVENTORIES

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. The weighted average methodology is applied to determine cost. As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company’s inventories were composed of:

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

Raw materials

 

$

2,519

 

 

$

4,276

 

Work in progress

 

 

5,267

 

 

 

8,435

 

Finished products

 

 

12,120

 

 

 

9,314

 

Total

 

$

19,906

 

 

$

22,025

 

 

v3.10.0.1
Commitments and Contingent Liabilities
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Commitments And Contingencies Disclosure [Abstract]  
Commitments and Contingent Liabilities

NOTE 4: COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

The facilities of the Company are leased under various operating lease agreements for periods ending no later than 2024. The Company also leases motor vehicles under various operating leases, which expire on various dates, the latest of which is in 2021.

As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company pledged bank deposits of $1,145 and $1,038, respectively, to cover bank guarantees in respect of its leases of operating facilities and obtained bank guarantees for the fulfillment of the Company’s lease and other contractual commitments of $1,305 and $1,202, respectively.

In the first quarter of 2018, the Company made a milestone payment of $5.5 million (the “Milestone Payment”) to the Technion Research and Development Foundation (“Technion”) pursuant to the settlement agreement dated February 10, 2015 (the “Settlement Agreement”).  Pursuant to the Settlement Agreement, and in exchange for a release of potential disputes regarding intellectual property developed by our founder and previously assigned to us, the Company was obligated to pay the Milestone Payment to Technion in the quarter following the quarter in which the Company achieved $250.0 million of cumulative net sales (as defined in the Settlement Agreement) (the “Net Sales Milestone”).  The Company achieved the Net Sales Milestone in the fourth quarter of 2017.

v3.10.0.1
Long Term Loan
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Debt Disclosure [Abstract]  
Long Term Loan

 

NOTE 5: LONG TERM LOAN

 

On February 7, 2018, the Company and certain of its subsidiaries entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (“2018 Loan Agreement”) with BioPharma Credit PLC pursuant to which such lender made a term loan to the Company in the principal amount of $150 million (the “2018 Credit Facility”). The term loan, which was drawn in full upon execution of the 2018 Loan Agreement, bears interest at 9.0% per annum, payable quarterly in arrears.  The Company used a portion of the proceeds of the 2018 Credit Facility to repay in full the Company’s obligations under its existing term loan credit facility and will use the remaining proceeds to fund general corporate purposes.

 

The 2018 Credit Facility will mature on February 7, 2023, at which time any unpaid principal and accrued unpaid interest in respect of the term loan will be due and payable.  The Company may prepay the term loan, in full, at any time. The Company must prepay the term loan (i) in full or in part upon the entry into certain licensing arrangements and (ii) in full in the event of a change of control. In each case, any prepayment (whether permitted or mandatory) is subject to a prepayment premium and/or make-whole payment. The pre-payment fee if the Company prepays outstanding loan amounts prior to February 7, 2021 is 2.0% and is 1.0% if made after the February 7, 2021 but prior to February 7, 2022.

All obligations under the 2018 Credit Facility are guaranteed by the Company’s current and future direct and indirect subsidiaries. In addition, the obligations under the 2018 Credit Facility are secured by a first-priority security interest in substantially all of the property and assets of, as well as the equity interests owned by, the Company and certain of the other guarantors. The 2018 Credit Facility contains other customary covenants.

Total net issuance costs of the 2018 Credit Facility, which were $805 as of June 30, 2018, are presented net of the 2018 Credit Facility proceeds and are amortized to interest expense over the five year term of the loan using the effective interest method.  

On February 7, 2018, the Company’s 2015 term loan credit facility was terminated upon the Company’s repayment in full of the term loan issued thereunder. The un-amortized discount in the amount of $1,160 and issuance costs in the amount of $1,399 were fully amortized and included in the Company’s first quarter finance expenses.

v3.10.0.1
Share Capital
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Share Based Compensation Allocation And Classification In Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Share Capital

NOTE 6: SHARE CAPITAL

For the six months ended June 30, 2018, warrants to purchase 201,692 ordinary shares with an exercise price of $3.59 per share were cashlessly exercised, resulting in the issuance of 167,212 ordinary shares.  Also, warrants to purchase 1,549 ordinary shares with an exercise price of $3.59 per share were exercised for cash. For the six months ended June 30, 2018, options to purchase 2,253,654 ordinary shares were exercised, resulting in the issuance of 2,251,676 ordinary shares.  

v3.10.0.1
Equity Incentive Plans
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Disclosure Of Compensation Related Costs Sharebased Payments [Abstract]  
Equity Incentive Plans

NOTE 7: EQUITY INCENTIVE PLANS

In September 2015, the Company adopted the 2015 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “2015 Plan”).  Under the 2015 Plan, the Company can issue various types of equity compensation awards such as share options, restricted shares, performance shares, restricted stock units (“RSUs”), performance units, long-term cash awards and other share-based awards.  

Options granted under the 2015 Plan generally have a four-year vesting period and expire ten years after the date of grant. Options granted under the 2015 Plan that are cancelled or forfeited before expiration become available for future grants. RSUs granted under the 2015 Plan vest in equal installments over a three-year period.  As of June 30, 2018, 10,416,052 ordinary shares were available for grant under the 2015 Plan.  

A summary of the status of the Company’s option plans as of June 30, 2018 and changes during the period then ended is presented below: 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2018

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

 

Number

of options

 

 

Weighted

average

exercise

price

 

Outstanding at beginning of year

 

 

14,806,027

 

 

$

10.64

 

Granted

 

 

2,199,389

 

 

 

22.31

 

Exercised

 

 

(2,253,654

)

 

 

6.54

 

Forfeited and cancelled

 

 

(127,262

)

 

 

14.59

 

Outstanding as of June 30, 2018

 

 

14,624,500

 

 

$

12.99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercisable options

 

 

5,955,869

 

 

$

10.20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A summary of the status of the Company’s RSUs as of June 30, 2018 and changes during the period then ended is presented below: 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2018

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

 

Number

of RSUs

 

 

Weighted

average

grant date fair value

price

 

Unvested at beginning of year

 

 

1,651,219

 

 

$

9.66

 

Granted

 

 

482,232

 

 

 

22.20

 

Vested

 

 

(550,418

)

 

 

9.66

 

Forfeited and cancelled

 

 

(10,760

)

 

 

12.13

 

Unvested as of June 30, 2018

 

 

1,572,273

 

 

$

13.49

 

 

In September 2015, the Company adopted an employee share purchase plan (“ESPP”) to encourage and enable eligible employees to acquire ownership of the Company’s ordinary shares purchased through accumulated payroll deductions on an after-tax basis. In the United States, the ESPP is intended to be an “employee stock purchase plan” within the meaning of Section 423 of the Internal Revenue Code and the provisions of the ESPP will be construed in a manner consistent with the requirements of such section. The Company began its offerings under the ESPP on August 1, 2016. As of June 30, 2018, 2,223,319 ordinary shares were available to be purchased by eligible employees under the ESPP and 314,207 shares had been issued under the ESPP.

The fair value of share-based awards was estimated using the Black-Scholes model for all equity grants. For market condition awards, the Company also applied the Monte-Carlo simulation model, with the following underlying assumptions: 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

Year ended

December 31,

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2017

 

 

Unaudited

 

Audited

Stock Option Plans

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected term (years)

 

5.50-6.25

 

5.50-6.25

 

5.50-6.25

Expected volatility

 

52%-55%

 

57%-59%

 

57%-59%

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.70%-2.89%

 

1.99%-2.23%

 

1.97%-2.23%

Dividend yield

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

ESPP

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected term (years)

 

0.50

 

0.50

 

0.50

Expected volatility

 

53%

 

82%

 

76%-82%

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.61%

 

0.62%

 

0.62%-1.13%

Dividend yield

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

 

The total non-cash share-based compensation expense related to all of the Company’s equity-based awards recognized for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 and the year ended December 31, 2017 was:

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

 

Year ended

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

Cost of revenues

 

$

263

 

 

$

131

 

 

$

428

 

 

$

274

 

 

$

467

 

Research, development and clinical trials

 

 

1,286

 

 

 

811

 

 

 

2,192

 

 

 

1,673

 

 

 

3,587

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

1,893

 

 

 

1,735

 

 

 

3,329

 

 

 

2,390

 

 

 

3,784

 

General and administrative

 

 

6,764

 

 

 

4,893

 

 

 

12,777

 

 

 

7,794

 

 

 

19,278

 

Total share-based compensation expense

 

$

10,206

 

 

$

7,570

 

 

$

18,726

 

 

$

12,131

 

 

$

27,116

 

 

v3.10.0.1
Supplemental Information
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Geographic Areas Long Lived Assets [Abstract]  
Supplemental Information

NOTE 8: SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

The Company operates in a single reportable segment.

The following table presents long-lived assets by location:

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

United States

 

$

9,731

 

 

$

10,372

 

Switzerland

 

 

4,211

 

 

 

5,114

 

Israel

 

 

2,238

 

 

 

2,081

 

Others

 

 

819

 

 

 

500

 

Total

 

$

16,999

 

 

$

18,067

 

 

The Company’s revenues by geographic region, based on the customer’s location, are summarized as follows:

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

 

Year ended

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

United States

 

$

41,935

 

 

$

31,367

 

 

$

79,738

 

 

$

60,526

 

 

$

134,688

 

EMEA (*)

 

 

18,522

 

 

 

6,891

 

 

 

32,396

 

 

 

12,559

 

 

 

42,035

 

Japan

 

 

1,057

 

 

 

118

 

 

 

1,505

 

 

 

171

 

 

 

303

 

Total

 

$

61,514

 

 

$

38,376

 

 

$

113,639

 

 

$

73,256

 

 

$

177,026

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(*) including Germany

 

$

17,651

 

 

$

6,817

 

 

$

31,009

 

 

$

12,216

 

 

$

40,215

 

 

v3.10.0.1
Organization and Basis of Presentation (Policies)
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Organization Consolidation And Presentation Of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements. In May 2014, FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (ASU 2014-09), an updated standard on revenue recognition and issued subsequent amendments to the initial guidance in March 2016, April 2016, May 2016 and December 2016 within ASU 2016-08, 2016-10, 2016-12 and 2016-20, respectively (collectively, “ASC 606”). The core principle of the new standard is for companies to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods and services to patients in amounts that reflect the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. In addition, the new standard requires expanded disclosures. The Company has adopted the standard effective January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method for all contracts. The reported results for 2018 reflect the application of ASC 606 guidance while the reported results for 2017 were prepared under the guidance of ASC 605, Revenue Recognition (ASC 605). The amount of revenue recognized in 2018 reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled to receive in exchange for Optune.

In preparation for adoption of the standard, the Company has implemented internal controls and key system functionality to enable the preparation of financial information, including the assessment of the impact of the standard.  The Company uses the portfolio approach to apply the standard to portfolios of contracts with similar characteristics. Adoption of the standard resulted in an increase to trade receivables of $2,807, deferred revenues of $645 and a cumulative impact to the Company's accumulated deficit as of January 1, 2018 of $2,162.

Optune is comprised of two main components: (1) an electric field generator and (2) transducer arrays and related accessories. We retain title to the electric field generator, and the patient is provided replacement transducer arrays and technical support for the device during the term of treatment. The electric field generator and transducer arrays are always supplied and function together and are not sold on a standalone basis.

To recognize revenue under ASC 606, the Company applies the following five steps:    

1. Identify the contract with a patient.   A contract with a patient exists when (i) the Company enters into an enforceable contract with a patient that defines each party’s rights regarding delivery of and payment for Optune, (ii) the contract has commercial substance and (iii) the Company determines that collection of substantially all consideration for Optune is probable based on the payer’s intent and ability to pay the promised consideration. The evidence of a contract generally consists of a prescription, a patient service agreement and the verification of the assigned payer for the contract and intention to collect.

2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract.  Optune contracts include the lease of the device, the supply obligation of disposable transducer arrays and technical support for the term of treatment. To the extent a contract includes multiple promised products and/or services, the Company must apply judgment to determine whether those products and/or services are capable of being distinct in the context of the contract. If these criteria are not met the promised products and/or services are accounted for as a combined performance obligation. In the Company’s case, Optune’s device, support, and disposables are provided as one inseparable package of monthly treatment for a single monthly fee.

3. Determine the transaction price.   The transaction price is determined based on the consideration to which the Company will be entitled in exchange for providing Optune to the patient. To the extent the transaction price includes variable consideration, the Company estimates the amount of variable consideration that should be included in the transaction price utilizing either the expected value method or the most likely amount method depending on the nature of the variable consideration. Variable consideration is included in the transaction price if, in the Company’s judgment, it is probable that a significant future reversal of cumulative revenue under the contract will not occur. The Company has agreements with many payers that define explicit discounts off the gross transaction price. In addition to the explicit discounts negotiated with each payer, the Company expects to receive, in aggregate for a given portfolio, less than the gross revenue net of explicit discounts. ASC 606 requires that the Company recognize this variable consideration as an implicit discount in the billing period. The implicit discount includes both an estimate of claims that will pay at an amount less than billed and an estimate of claims that will not pay within a given time horizon. The implicit discount adjustments to the transaction price are due to concessions, not collectability concerns driven by payer credit risk.

4. Allocate the transaction price to performance obligations in the contract.  If a contract contains a single performance obligation, the entire transaction price is allocated to the single performance obligation. As discussed above, there is one performance obligation under the Company’s contracts and, therefore, the monthly transaction price determined for the performance obligation will be recognized over time ratably over the monthly term of the treatment.     

5. Recognize revenue when or as the Company satisfies a performance obligation.   The Company satisfies performance obligations over time as discussed above. Revenue is recognized at the time the related performance obligation is satisfied by transferring a promised service to a patient. The patient consumes the benefits of Optune treatment on a daily basis over the monthly term. As this criterion is met, the revenues will be recognized over the monthly term.

In accordance with ASC 606, the impact of our adoption of ASC 606 on our condensed consolidated statements of income for the six and three months ended June 30, 2018 were a decrease in net revenues of $5,531 and $1,993, respectively, an increase in net loss of $5,371 and $2,035, respectively, and a decrease in our basic and diluted net loss per ordinary share of $0.06 and $0.02, respectively.  The impact of our adoption of Topic 606 on our balance sheet as of June 30, 2018 was a decrease in trade receivables of $2,760, an increase to other payables and accrued expenses (deferred revenues net of tax provision) of $521 and an accumulated deficit as of June 30, 2018 of $3,209.

In August 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments. ASU 2016-15 eliminates the diversity in practice related to the classification of certain cash receipts and payments for debt prepayment or extinguishment costs, the maturing of a zero coupon bond, the settlement of contingent liabilities arising from a business combination, proceeds from insurance settlements, distributions from certain equity method investees and beneficial interests obtained in a financial asset securitization. ASU 2016-15 designates the appropriate cash flow classification, including requirements to allocate certain components of these cash receipts and payments among operating, investing and financing activities. The retrospective transition method, requiring adjustment to all comparative periods presented, is required unless it is impracticable for some of the amendments, in which case those amendments would be prospectively as of the earliest date practicable. The Company adopted the standard effective as of January 1, 2018, and the adoption of this standard did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash.  This standard requires the presentation of the statement of cash flows to show the changes in the total of cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents. The standard is effective for fiscal years and the interim periods within those fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company adopted the standard retrospectively to all periods presented effective as of January 1, 2018.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements. In February 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-02-Leases (ASC 842), which sets out the principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases for both parties to a contract (i.e. lessees and lessors). The new standard requires lessees to apply a dual approach, classifying leases as either finance or operating leases based on the principle of whether or not the lease is effectively a financed purchase by the lessee. This classification will determine whether lease expense is recognized based on an effective interest method or on a straight line basis over the term of the lease, respectively. A lessee is also required to record a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with a term of greater than twelve months regardless of their classification. Leases with a term of twelve months or less will be accounted for similar to existing guidance for operating leases. The new standard requires lessors to account for leases using an approach that is substantially equivalent to existing guidance for sales-type leases, direct financing leases and operating leases. ASC 842 supersedes the previous leases standard, ASC 840. The standard is effective on January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company currently anticipates adopting the new standard effective January 1, 2019 and is evaluating the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In June 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. ASU 2016-13 amends the impairment model to utilize an expected loss methodology in place of the currently used incurred loss methodology, which will result in the more timely recognition of losses. ASU 2016-13 also applies to employee benefit plan accounting, with an effective date of the first quarter of fiscal 2020. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 31, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements, footnote disclosures and employee benefit plans’ accounting.

In June 2018, FASB issued ASU 2018-07 to expand the scope of ASC Topic 718, Compensation - Stock Compensation, to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. The pronouncement is effective for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company is evaluating the effects of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

 

v3.10.0.1
Inventories (Tables)
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Inventory Disclosure [Abstract]  
Schedule of Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. The weighted average methodology is applied to determine cost. As of June 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the Company’s inventories were composed of:

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

Raw materials

 

$

2,519

 

 

$

4,276

 

Work in progress

 

 

5,267

 

 

 

8,435

 

Finished products

 

 

12,120

 

 

 

9,314

 

Total

 

$

19,906

 

 

$

22,025

 

 

v3.10.0.1
Equity Incentive Plans (Tables)
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Disclosure Of Compensation Related Costs Sharebased Payments [Abstract]  
Schedule of Stock Option Plans

A summary of the status of the Company’s option plans as of June 30, 2018 and changes during the period then ended is presented below: 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2018

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

 

Number

of options

 

 

Weighted

average

exercise

price

 

Outstanding at beginning of year

 

 

14,806,027

 

 

$

10.64

 

Granted

 

 

2,199,389

 

 

 

22.31

 

Exercised

 

 

(2,253,654

)

 

 

6.54

 

Forfeited and cancelled

 

 

(127,262

)

 

 

14.59

 

Outstanding as of June 30, 2018

 

 

14,624,500

 

 

$

12.99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercisable options

 

 

5,955,869

 

 

$

10.20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schedule of RSU's

A summary of the status of the Company’s RSUs as of June 30, 2018 and changes during the period then ended is presented below: 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2018

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

 

Number

of RSUs

 

 

Weighted

average

grant date fair value

price

 

Unvested at beginning of year

 

 

1,651,219

 

 

$

9.66

 

Granted

 

 

482,232

 

 

 

22.20

 

Vested

 

 

(550,418

)

 

 

9.66

 

Forfeited and cancelled

 

 

(10,760

)

 

 

12.13

 

Unvested as of June 30, 2018

 

 

1,572,273

 

 

$

13.49

 

 

Schedule of Fair Value Assumptions Used for All Equity Based Awards Estimated Using Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model

The fair value of share-based awards was estimated using the Black-Scholes model for all equity grants. For market condition awards, the Company also applied the Monte-Carlo simulation model, with the following underlying assumptions: 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

Year ended

December 31,

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2017

 

 

Unaudited

 

Audited

Stock Option Plans

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected term (years)

 

5.50-6.25

 

5.50-6.25

 

5.50-6.25

Expected volatility

 

52%-55%

 

57%-59%

 

57%-59%

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.70%-2.89%

 

1.99%-2.23%

 

1.97%-2.23%

Dividend yield

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

ESPP

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected term (years)

 

0.50

 

0.50

 

0.50

Expected volatility

 

53%

 

82%

 

76%-82%

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.61%

 

0.62%

 

0.62%-1.13%

Dividend yield

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

 

0.00%

 

Schedule of Non-cash Share-based Compensation Expense Related to Company's Equity-Based Awards

The total non-cash share-based compensation expense related to all of the Company’s equity-based awards recognized for the three and six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2017 and the year ended December 31, 2017 was:

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

 

Year ended

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

Cost of revenues

 

$

263

 

 

$

131

 

 

$

428

 

 

$

274

 

 

$

467

 

Research, development and clinical trials

 

 

1,286

 

 

 

811

 

 

 

2,192

 

 

 

1,673

 

 

 

3,587

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

1,893

 

 

 

1,735

 

 

 

3,329

 

 

 

2,390

 

 

 

3,784

 

General and administrative

 

 

6,764

 

 

 

4,893

 

 

 

12,777

 

 

 

7,794

 

 

 

19,278

 

Total share-based compensation expense

 

$

10,206

 

 

$

7,570

 

 

$

18,726

 

 

$

12,131

 

 

$

27,116

 

 

v3.10.0.1
Supplemental Information (Tables)
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Geographic Areas Long Lived Assets [Abstract]  
Schedule of Long-Lived Assets by Location

The following table presents long-lived assets by location:

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

United States

 

$

9,731

 

 

$

10,372

 

Switzerland

 

 

4,211

 

 

 

5,114

 

Israel

 

 

2,238

 

 

 

2,081

 

Others

 

 

819

 

 

 

500

 

Total

 

$

16,999

 

 

$

18,067

 

 

Schedule of Revenues by Geographic Region

The Company’s revenues by geographic region, based on the customer’s location, are summarized as follows:

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

 

Year ended

December 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Unaudited

 

 

Audited

 

United States

 

$

41,935

 

 

$

31,367

 

 

$

79,738

 

 

$

60,526

 

 

$

134,688

 

EMEA (*)

 

 

18,522

 

 

 

6,891

 

 

 

32,396

 

 

 

12,559

 

 

 

42,035

 

Japan

 

 

1,057

 

 

 

118

 

 

 

1,505

 

 

 

171

 

 

 

303

 

Total

 

$

61,514

 

 

$

38,376

 

 

$

113,639

 

 

$

73,256

 

 

$

177,026

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(*) including Germany

 

$

17,651

 

 

$

6,817

 

 

$

31,009

 

 

$

12,216

 

 

$

40,215

 

 

v3.10.0.1
Organization and Basis of Presentation - Additional Information (Detail) - USD ($)
$ / shares in Units, $ in Thousands
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2017
Dec. 31, 2017
Organization and Basis of Presentation [Line Items]          
Increase (decrease) in trade receivables $ 3,599 $ 2,064 $ 5,271 $ 7,550 $ 23,228
Decrease in net revenue 61,514 38,376 113,639 73,256 177,026
Net loss $ (15,510) $ (21,174) $ (36,234) $ (39,219) $ (61,662)
Decrease in basic and diluted net loss per ordinary share $ (0.17) $ (0.24) $ (0.40) $ (0.45) $ (0.70)
Increase in other payables and accrued expenses $ (528) $ 4,888 $ (8,828) $ 3,478 $ 14,460
Accounting Standards Update 2014-09 [Member]          
Organization and Basis of Presentation [Line Items]          
Increase (decrease) in trade receivables     (2,760)   2,807
Increase in deferred revenue         645
Cumulative deficit effect adjustment resulting from ASU 2014-09 adoption (3,209)   (3,209)   $ (2,162)
Net loss $ (2,035)   $ (5,371)    
Decrease in basic and diluted net loss per ordinary share $ (0.02)   $ (0.06)    
Increase in other payables and accrued expenses     $ 521    
Accounting Standards Update 2014-09 [Member] | Difference between Revenue Guidance in Effect before and after Topic 606 [Member]          
Organization and Basis of Presentation [Line Items]          
Decrease in net revenue $ (1,993)   $ (5,531)    
Accounting Standards Update 2014-09 [Member] | First Generation Optune System Field Equipment [Member]          
Organization and Basis of Presentation [Line Items]          
Identify the contract with patient     Identify the contract with a patient. A contract with a patient exists when (i) the Company enters into an enforceable contract with a patient that defines each party’s rights regarding delivery of and payment for Optune, (ii) the contract has commercial substance and (iii) the Company determines that collection of substantially all consideration for Optune is probable based on the payer’s intent and ability to pay the promised consideration. The evidence of a contract generally consists of a prescription, a patient service agreement and the verification of the assigned payer for the contract and intention to collect.    
Identify the performance obligations in the contract, description     Optune contracts include the lease of the device, the supply obligation of disposable transducer arrays and technical support for the term of treatment. To the extent a contract includes multiple promised products and/or services, the Company must apply judgment to determine whether those products and/or services are capable of being distinct in the context of the contract. If these criteria are not met the promised products and/or services are accounted for as a combined performance obligation. In the Company’s case, Optune’s device, support, and disposables are provided as one inseparable package of monthly treatment for a single monthly fee    
Determine the transaction price, description     The transaction price is determined based on the consideration to which the Company will be entitled in exchange for providing Optune to the patient.    
Allocate the transaction price to performance obligations in the contract, description     If a contract contains a single performance obligation, the entire transaction price is allocated to the single performance obligation. As discussed above, there is one performance obligation under the Company’s contracts and, therefore, the monthly transaction price determined for the performance obligation will be recognized over time ratably over the monthly term of the treatment.    
Recognize revenue when or as the company satisfies a performance obligation, description     The Company satisfies performance obligations over time as discussed above. Revenue is recognized at the time the related performance obligation is satisfied by transferring a promised service to a patient. The patient consumes the benefits of Optune treatment on a daily basis over the monthly term. As this criterion is met, the revenues will be recognized over the monthly term.    
v3.10.0.1
Short-Term Investments - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Jun. 30, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Investments Debt And Equity Securities [Abstract]    
Short-term investments $ 104,499 $ 104,719
Estimated fair value of short-term investments $ 104,512 $ 104,655
v3.10.0.1
Inventories - Schedule of Inventories (Details) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
Jun. 30, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Inventory Disclosure [Abstract]    
Raw materials $ 2,519 $ 4,276
Work in progress 5,267 8,435
Finished products 12,120 9,314
Total $ 19,906 $ 22,025
v3.10.0.1
Commitments and Contingent Liabilities - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Jun. 30, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Loss Contingencies [Line Items]      
Operating lease expiration description   The facilities of the Company are leased under various operating lease agreements for periods ending no later than 2024.  
Pledged bank deposits   $ 1,145 $ 1,038
Operating lease and other contractual commitments   1,305 $ 1,202
Settlement agreement date February 10, 2015    
Settlement Agreement      
Loss Contingencies [Line Items]      
Settlement expense $ 5,500    
Net sales milestone   $ 250,000  
Motor Vehicles      
Loss Contingencies [Line Items]      
Operating lease expiration description   The Company also leases motor vehicles under various operating leases, which expire on various dates, the latest of which is in 2021.  
Maximum      
Loss Contingencies [Line Items]      
Operating lease agreements, expiration year   2024  
Maximum | Motor Vehicles      
Loss Contingencies [Line Items]      
Operating lease agreements, expiration year   2021  
v3.10.0.1
Long Term Loan - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($)
$ in Thousands
6 Months Ended
Feb. 07, 2018
Jun. 30, 2018
2018 Credit Facility    
Line Of Credit Facility [Line Items]    
Term loan, principal amount $ 150,000  
Interest on term loan credit facility 9.00%  
Interest, frequency of payment quarterly  
Term loan credit facility, expiation date Feb. 07, 2023  
Debt issuance costs, net   $ 805
Term loan credit facility, maturity term   5 years
2018 Credit Facility | Prior to February 7, 2021    
Line Of Credit Facility [Line Items]    
Pre-payment fee, percentage 2.00%  
2018 Credit Facility | February 7, 2021 to February 7, 2022    
Line Of Credit Facility [Line Items]    
Pre-payment fee, percentage 1.00%  
Term Loan    
Line Of Credit Facility [Line Items]    
Debt issuance costs, net $ 1,399  
Debt instrument, un-amortized discount $ 1,160