VOYA FINANCIAL, INC., 10-K filed on 2/22/2019
Annual Report
v3.10.0.1
Document and Entity Information - USD ($)
$ in Billions
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Feb. 15, 2019
Jun. 30, 2018
Document and Entity Information [Abstract]      
Entity Registrant Name Voya Financial, Inc.    
Entity Central Index Key 0001535929    
Current Fiscal Year End Date --12-31    
Entity Filer Category Large Accelerated Filer    
Document Type 10-K    
Document Period End Date Dec. 31, 2018    
Document Fiscal Year Focus 2018    
Document Fiscal Period Focus FY    
Amendment Flag false    
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding   145,936,197  
Entity Well-known Seasoned Issuer Yes    
Entity Voluntary Filers No    
Entity Current Reporting Status Yes    
Entity Public Float     $ 7.6
Entity Shell Company false    
Entity Emerging Growth Company false    
Entity Small Business false    
v3.10.0.1
Consolidated Balance Sheets - USD ($)
$ in Millions
Dec. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Investments:    
Fixed maturities, available-for-sale, at fair value $ 46,298 $ 48,329
Fixed maturities, at fair value using the fair value option 2,956 3,018
Equity securities, at fair value (cost of $255 as of 2018 and $353 as of 2017) 273 380
Short-term investments 168 471
Mortgage loans on real estate, net of valuation allowance of $2 as of 2018 and $3 as of 2017 8,676 8,686
Policy loans 1,833 1,888
Limited partnerships/corporations 1,158 784
Derivatives 247 397
Other investments 90 47
Total investments 63,566 66,087
Cash and cash equivalents 1,538 1,218
Short-term investments under securities loan agreements, including collateral delivered 1,684 1,626
Accrued investment income 650 667
Premium receivable and reinsurance recoverable 6,860 7,632
Deferred policy acquisition costs, Value of business acquired 4,116 3,374
Current income taxes 237 4
Deferred income taxes 1,157 781
Other assets 1,336 1,310
Assets related to consolidated investment entities:    
Assets held in consolidated investment entities 2,310 3,176
Assets held in separate accounts 71,228 77,605
Assets held for sale 0 59,052
Total assets 154,682 222,532
Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity:    
Future policy benefits 14,488 15,647
Contract owner account balances 51,001 50,158
Payables under securities loan agreement, including collateral held 1,821 1,866
Short-term debt 1 337
Long-term debt 3,136 3,123
Derivatives 139 149
Pension and other post-employment provisions 551 550
Other liabilities 2,148 2,076
Liabilities related to consolidated investment entities:    
Collateralized loan obligations notes, at fair value using the fair value option 540 1,047
Other liabilities 688 658
Liabilities related to separate accounts 71,228 77,605
Liabilities held for sale 0 58,277
Total liabilities 145,741 211,493
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 19)
Shareholders' equity:    
Preferred stock ($0.01 par value per share; 325,000 shares authorized as of 2018; 325,000 shares issued and outstanding as of 2018; $325 aggregate liquidation preference) 0 0
Common stock ($0.01 par value per share; 900,000,000 shares authorized; 272,431,745 and 270,078,294 shares issued as of 2018 and 2017, respectively; 150,978,184 and 171,982,673 shares outstanding as of 2018 and 2017, respectively) 3 3
Treasury stock (at cost; 121,453,561 and 98,095,621 shares as of 2018 and 2017, respectively) (4,981) (3,827)
Additional paid-in capital 24,316 23,821
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) 607 2,731
Retained earnings (deficit):    
Appropriated-consolidated investment entities 0 0
Unappropriated (11,732) (12,719)
Total Voya Financial, Inc. shareholders' equity 8,213 10,009
Noncontrolling interest 728 1,030
Total shareholder's equity 8,941 11,039
Total liabilities and shareholder's equity 154,682 222,532
Limited partnerships/corporations, at fair value    
Assets related to consolidated investment entities:    
Assets held in consolidated investment entities 1,421 1,795
Cash and cash equivalents    
Assets related to consolidated investment entities:    
Assets held in consolidated investment entities 331 217
Corporate loans, at fair value using the fair value option    
Assets related to consolidated investment entities:    
Assets held in consolidated investment entities 542 1,089
Other assets    
Assets related to consolidated investment entities:    
Assets held in consolidated investment entities 16 75
Collateral pledged    
Investments:    
Securities pledged (amortized cost of $1,824 as of 2018 and $1,823 as of 2017) $ 1,867 $ 2,087
v3.10.0.1
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets Parenthetical - USD ($)
$ in Millions
Dec. 31, 2018
Sep. 12, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Dec. 31, 2016
Dec. 31, 2015
Statement of Financial Position [Abstract]          
Fixed maturities, amortized cost $ 45,241   $ 44,366    
Equity securities, cost 255   353    
Mortgage loans on real estate valuation allowance 2   3    
Securities pledged, amortized costs $ 1,824   $ 1,823    
Preferred stock, shares authorized 325,000        
Preferred stock, shares issued and outstanding 325,000 325,000      
Preferred stock, aggregate liquidation preference $ 325        
Preferred stock, par value $ 0.01 $ 0.01      
Common stock, shares authorized 900,000,000   900,000,000    
Common stock, shares issued 272,431,745   270,078,294    
Common stock, shares outstanding 150,978,184   171,982,673 194,600,000 209,100,000
Treasury stock 121,453,561   98,095,621    
Common stock, par value $ 0.01   $ 0.01    
v3.10.0.1
Consolidated Statements of Operations - USD ($)
$ in Millions
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Dec. 31, 2016
Revenues:      
Net investment income $ 3,307 $ 3,294 $ 3,354
Fee income 2,708 2,627 2,471
Premiums 2,159 2,121 2,795
Net realized gains (losses):      
Total other-than-temporary impairments (28) (30) (32)
Less: Portion of other-than-temporary impairments recognized in Other comprehensive income (loss) 1 (9) 2
Net other-than-temporary impairments recognized in earnings (29) (21) (34)
Other net realized capital gains (losses) (370) (206) (329)
Total net realized capital gains (losses) (399) (227) (363)
Other revenue 447 371 342
Net investment income 292 432 189
Total revenues 8,514 8,618 8,788
Benefits and expenses:      
Policyholder benefits 3,045 3,030 3,710
Interest credited to contract owner account balances 1,530 1,606 1,604
Operating expenses 2,691 2,654 2,655
Net amortization of Deferred policy acquisition costs and Value of business acquired 368 529 415
Interest expense 221 184 288
Interest expense 41 80 102
Other expense 8 7 4
Total benefits and expenses 7,904 8,090 8,778
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes 610 528 10
Income tax expense (benefit) 55 740 (29)
Income (loss) from continuing operations 555 (212) 39
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax 457 (2,580) (337)
Net income (loss) 1,012 (2,792) (298)
Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest 137 200 29
Net income (loss) available to Voya Financial, Inc. $ 875 $ (2,992) $ (327)
Net income (loss) per common share:      
Income (loss) from continuing operations available to Voya Financial, Inc.'s common shareholders $ 2.56 $ (2.24) $ 0.05
Income (loss) available to Voya Financial, Inc.'s common shareholders 5.36 (16.25) (1.63)
Income (loss) from continuing operations available to Voya Financial, Inc.'s common shareholders 2.48 (2.24) 0.05
Income (loss) available to Voya Financial, Inc.'s common shareholders 5.20 (16.25) (1.61)
Cash dividends declared per share of common stock $ 0.04 $ 0.04 $ 0.04
v3.10.0.1
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income - USD ($)
$ in Millions
3 Months Ended 12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Sep. 30, 2018
Jun. 30, 2018
Mar. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Sep. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2017
Mar. 31, 2017
Dec. 31, 2018
Dec. 31, 2017
Dec. 31, 2016
Statement of Comprehensive Income [Abstract]                      
Net income (loss) $ 177 $ 165 $ 224 $ 446 $ (3,083) $ 214 $ 219 $ (142) $ 1,012 $ (2,792) $ (298)
Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax:                      
Unrealized gains (losses) on securities                 (2,810) 1,191 749
Other-than-temporary impairments                 32 (2) 24
Pension and other postretirement benefits liability                 (11) (15) (10)
Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax                 (2,789) 1,174 763
Income tax expense (benefit) related to items of other comprehensive income (loss)                 (693) 364 267
Other comprehensive income (loss), after tax                 (2,096) 810 496
Comprehensive income (loss)                 (1,084) (1,982) 198
Less: Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest                 137 200 29
Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to Voya Financial, Inc.'s common shareholders                 $ (1,221) $ (2,182) $ 169
v3.10.0.1
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholder's Equity - USD ($)
$ in Millions
Total
Preferred Stock
Common Stock
Treasury Stock
Additional Paid-In Capital
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Appropriated
Unappropriated
Total Voya Financial, Inc. Shareholders' Equity
Noncontrolling Interest
Previously Reported
Previously Reported
Preferred Stock
Previously Reported
Common Stock
Previously Reported
Treasury Stock
Previously Reported
Additional Paid-In Capital
Previously Reported
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Previously Reported
Appropriated
Previously Reported
Unappropriated
Previously Reported
Total Voya Financial, Inc. Shareholders' Equity
Previously Reported
Noncontrolling Interest
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity                                        
Adjustment for adoption of ASU | Accounting Standards Update 2015-02 $ (1,592.0) $ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 9.0 $ 0.0 $ 9.0 $ (1,601.0)                    
Adjustment for adoption of ASU | Accounting Standards Update 2014-13 (18.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (18.0) 0.0 (18.0) 0.0                    
Balance- As adjusted 14,667.0 0.0 3.0 (2,302.0) 23,717.0 1,425.0 0.0 (9,415.0) 13,428.0 1,239.0                    
Balance at Dec. 31, 2015                     $ 16,277.0 $ 0.0 $ 3.0 $ (2,302.0) $ 23,717.0 $ 1,425.0 $ 9.0 $ (9,415.0) $ 13,437.0 $ 2,840.0
Comprehensive income (loss)                                        
Net income (loss) (298.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (327.0) (327.0) 29.0                    
Other comprehensive income (loss), after tax 496.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 496.0 0.0 0.0 496.0 0.0                    
Less: Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest 29.0                 29.0                    
Comprehensive income (loss) 198.0               169.0                      
Net consolidations (deconsolidations) of consolidated investment entities (70.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (70.0)                    
Common stock issuance 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0                    
Common stock acquired - Share repurchase (687.0) 0.0 0.0 (487.0) 200.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (687.0) 0.0                    
Dividends on common stock (8.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (8.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (8.0) 0.0                    
Share-based compensation 92.0 0.0 0.0 (7.0) 99.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 92.0 0.0                    
Contributions from (Distributions to) noncontrolling interest, net (225.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (225.0)                    
Balance at Dec. 31, 2016                     13,968.0 0.0 3.0 (2,796.0) 23,609.0 1,921.0 0.0 (9,742.0) 12,995.0 973.0
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity                                        
Adjustment for adoption of ASU | Accounting Standards Update 2016-09 15.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 15.0 15.0 0.0                    
Balance- As adjusted 13,983.0 0.0 3.0 (2,796.0) 23,609.0 1,921.0 0.0 (9,727.0) 13,010.0 973.0                    
Comprehensive income (loss)                                        
Net income (loss) (2,792.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (2,992.0) (2,992.0) 200.0                    
Other comprehensive income (loss), after tax 810.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 810.0 0.0 0.0 810.0 0.0                    
Less: Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest 200.0                 200.0                    
Comprehensive income (loss) (1,982.0)               (2,182.0)                      
Net consolidations (deconsolidations) of consolidated investment entities 38.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 38.0                    
Common stock issuance 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0                    
Common stock acquired - Share repurchase (923.0) 0.0 0.0 (1,023.0) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (923.0) 0.0                    
Dividends on common stock (8.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (8.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (8.0) 0.0                    
Share-based compensation 109.0 0.0 0.0 (8.0) 117.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 109.0 0.0                    
Contributions from (Distributions to) noncontrolling interest, net (181.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (181.0)                    
Balance at Dec. 31, 2017 11,039.0                   $ 11,039.0 $ 0.0 $ 3.0 $ (3,827.0) $ 23,821.0 $ 2,731.0 $ 0.0 $ (12,719.0) $ 10,009.0 $ 1,030.0
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity                                        
Adjustment for adoption of ASU | Accounting Standards Update 2014-09 84.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 84.0 84.0 0.0                    
Adjustment for adoption of ASU | Accounting Standards Update 2016-01 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (28.0) 0.0 28.0 0.0 0.0                    
Balance- As adjusted 11,123.0 0.0 3.0 (3,827.0) 23,821.0 2,703.0 0.0 (12,607.0) 10,093.0 1,030.0                    
Comprehensive income (loss)                                        
Net income (loss) 1,012.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 875.0 875.0 137.0                    
Reversal of Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) due to Sale of Annuity and CBVA (79.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (79.0) 0.0 0.0 (79.0) 0.0                    
Other comprehensive income (loss), after tax (2,017.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (2,017.0) 0.0 0.0 (2,017.0) 0.0                    
Other comprehensive income (loss), after tax (2,096.0)                                      
Less: Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest 137.0                 137.0                    
Comprehensive income (loss) (1,084.0)               (1,221.0)                      
Effect of transaction for entities under common control (31.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (31.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (31.0) 0.0                    
Net consolidations (deconsolidations) of consolidated investment entities (33.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (33.0)                    
Preferred stock issuance 319.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 319.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 319.0 0.0                    
Common stock issuance 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0                    
Common stock acquired - Share repurchase (1,025.0) 0.0 0.0 (1,125.0) 100.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (1,025.0) 0.0                    
Dividends on common stock (6.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (6.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (6.0) 0.0                    
Share-based compensation 81.0 0.0 0.0 (29.0) 110.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 81.0 0.0                    
Contributions from (Distributions to) noncontrolling interest, net (406.0) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 (406.0)                    
Balance at Dec. 31, 2018 $ 8,941.0 $ 0.0 $ 3.0 $ (4,981.0) $ 24,316.0 $ 607.0 $ 0.0 $ (11,732.0) $ 8,213.0 $ 728.0                    
v3.10.0.1
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
$ in Millions
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
USD ($)
Dec. 31, 2017
USD ($)
Dec. 31, 2016
USD ($)
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:      
Net income (loss) $ 1,012 $ (2,792) $ (298)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash proviced by operating activities:      
(Income) loss from discontinued operations, net of tax (457) 2,580 337
Capitalization of deferred policy acquisition costs, value of business acquired and sales inducements (217) (243) (264)
Net amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs, value of business acquired and sales inducements 370 534 420
Future policy benefits, claims reserves and interest credited (492) 899 1,298
Deferred income tax expense (benefit) 1 862 (151)
Net realized capital losses 399 227 363
Share-based compensation 96 117 99
(Gains) losses on consolidated investment entities (256) (343) (57)
(Gains) losses on limited partnerships/corporations (42) (31) (29)
Change in:      
Premiums receivable and reinsurance recoverable 773 (345) 363
Other receivables and assets accruals (524) 298 (18)
Other payables and accruals (185) (41) (190)
(Increase) decrease in cash held by consolidated investment entities (305) (557) (260)
Other, net 233 6 145
Net cash provided by operating activities - discontinued operations 1,462 411 1,934
Net cash provided by operating activities 1,868 1,582 3,692
Proceeds from the sale, maturity, disposal or redemption of:      
Fixed maturities 7,749 8,325 8,112
Equity securities 152 54 104
Mortgage loans on real estate 999 955 747
Limited partnerships/corporations 338 236 306
Acquisition of:      
Fixed maturities (8,946) (8,719) (9,839)
Equity securities, available-for-sale (69) (47) (47)
Mortgage loans on real estate (875) (1,638) (1,481)
Limited partnerships/corporations (381) (332) (367)
Short-term investments, net 337 (80) 31
Derivatives, net 97 213 (24)
Sales from consolidated investment entities 1,365 2,047 2,304
Purchases within consolidated investment entities (994) (2,036) (1,727)
Collateral received (delivered), net (103) (148) (22)
Other, net 15 3 20
Net cash used in investing activities - discontinued operations 34 (1,261) (1,800)
Net cash used in investing activities (282) (2,428) (3,683)
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:      
Deposits received for investment contracts 6,096 5,061 5,891
Maturities and withdrawals from investment contracts (5,503) (5,372) (5,412)
Settlements on Deposit Contracts (10) 0 0
Proceeds from issuance of debt with maturities of more than three months 350 399 798
Repayment of debt with maturities of more than three months (710) (494) (809)
Debt issuance costs (6) (3) (16)
Borrowings of consolidated investment entities 773 967 126
Repayments of borrowings of consolidated investment entities (656) (804) (455)
Contributions from (distributions to) participants in consolidated investment entities (166) 449 51
Proceeds from issuance of common stock, net 3 3 1
Proceeds from issuance of preferred stock, net 319 0 0
Share-based compensation (14) (8) (7)
Common stock acquired - Share repurchase (1,025) (923) (687)
Dividends paid on common stock (6) (8) (8)
Net cash used in financing activities - discontinued operations (1,209) 384 916
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities (1,764) (349) 389
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents (178) (1,195) 398
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period 1,716 2,911 2,513
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period 1,538 1,716 2,911
Less: Cash and cash equivalents of discontinued operations, end of period 0 498 815
Cash and cash equivalents of continuing operations, end of period 1,538 1,218 2,096
Supplemental cash flow information:      
Income taxes paid, net 1 (154) 69
Interest paid 180 174 190
Decrease of assets due to deconsolidation of consolidated investment entities 0 0 7,497
Decrease of liabilities due to deconsolidation of consolidated investment entities 0 0 5,905
Decrease of equity due to deconsolidation of consolidated investment entities 0 0 1,592
Elimination of appropriated retained earnings $ 0 $ 0 $ 18
v3.10.0.1
Business, Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Business, Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies Business, Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies

Business

Voya Financial, Inc. and its subsidiaries (collectively the "Company") is a financial services organization in the United States that offers a broad range of retirement services, investment management services, mutual funds, group insurance and supplemental health products.

The Company provides its principal products and services through four segments: Retirement, Investment Management, Employee Benefits and Individual Life. In addition, the Company includes in Corporate activities not directly related to its segments, results of the Retained Business (defined below) and certain run-off activities that are not meaningful to the Company's business strategy. See the Segments Note to these Consolidated Financial Statements.

After conducting a strategic review of the Individual Life business, in October 2018, the Company announced that it would retain the in-force block of individual life policies and cease new individual life insurance sales, effective December 31, 2018. Applications for individual life insurance policies were accepted through the end of 2018, resulting in some placement of policies in the first quarter of 2019. The Company will continue to manage its existing in-force Individual Life business as a separate segment, with results included in the Company's Adjusted operating earnings before income taxes.

On June 1, 2018, the Company consummated a series of transactions (collectively, the "Transaction") pursuant to a Master Transaction Agreement dated December 20, 2017 (the "MTA") with VA Capital Company LLC ("VA Capital") and Athene Holding Ltd. ("Athene"). As part of the Transaction, Venerable Holdings, Inc. ("Venerable"), a wholly owned subsidiary of VA Capital, acquired two of the Company's subsidiaries, Voya Insurance and Annuity Company ("VIAC") and Directed Services, LLC ("DSL"), and VIAC and other Voya subsidiaries reinsured to Athene substantially all of their fixed and fixed indexed annuities business. In connection with the Transaction, VIAC and another Voya subsidiary engaged in a series of reinsurance arrangements pursuant to which Voya and its subsidiaries other than VIAC retained VIAC’s businesses other than variable annuities and fixed and fixed indexed annuities.

The Transaction resulted in the disposition of substantially all of the Company's Closed Block Variable Annuity ("CBVA") and Annuities businesses. The assets and liabilities related to the businesses sold were classified as held for sale in the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31, 2017. The results of operations and cash flows of the businesses sold were classified as discontinued operations in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations and the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, respectively and are reported separately for all periods presented. See the Discontinued Operations Note to these Consolidated Financial Statements.

As a result of the Transaction, the Company no longer considers its CBVA and Annuities businesses as reportable segments. Additionally, the Company evaluated its segment presentation and determined that the retained CBVA and Annuities policies that are not included in the disposed businesses described above ("Retained Business") are insignificant. As such, the Company reported the results of the Retained Business in Corporate.

Prior to May 2013, the Company was an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of ING Groep N.V. ("ING Group" or "ING"), a global financial services holding company based in The Netherlands. In May 2013, Voya Financial Inc. completed its initial public offering ("IPO") of common stock, including the issuance and sale of common stock by Voya Financial, Inc. and the sale of shares of common stock owned indirectly by ING Group. Between October 2013 and March 2015, ING Group completed the sale of its remaining shares of common stock of Voya Financial, Inc. in a series of registered public offerings.

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("U.S. GAAP").

The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of Voya Financial, Inc. and its subsidiaries, as well as other (voting interest entities ("VOEs")) and variable interest entities ("VIEs") in which the Company has a controlling financial interest. See the Consolidated Investment Entities Note to these Consolidated Financial Statements. Intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

Significant Accounting Policies

Estimates and Assumptions

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the Consolidated Financial Statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Those estimates are inherently subject to change and actual results could differ from those estimates.

The Company has identified the following accounts and policies as the most significant in that they involve a higher degree of judgment, are subject to a significant degree of variability and/or contain significant accounting estimates:

Reserves for future policy benefits;
Deferred policy acquisition costs ("DAC"), value of business acquired ("VOBA") and other intangibles (collectively, "DAC/VOBA and other intangibles");
Valuation of investments and derivatives;
Impairments;
Income taxes;
Contingencies; and
Employee benefit plans.

Fair Value Measurement

The Company measures the fair value of its financial assets and liabilities based on assumptions used by market participants in pricing the asset or liability, which may include inherent risk, restrictions on the sale or use of an asset, or nonperformance risk, including the Company's own credit risk. The estimate of fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or transfer a liability ("exit price") in an orderly transaction between market participants in the principal market, or the most advantageous market in the absence of a principal market, for that asset or liability. The Company uses a number of valuation sources to determine the fair values of its financial assets and liabilities, including quoted market prices, third-party commercial pricing services, third-party brokers, industry-standard, vendor-provided software that models the value based on market observable inputs, and other internal modeling techniques based on projected cash flows.

Investments

The accounting policies for the Company's principal investments are as follows:

Fixed Maturities and Equity Securities: Effective January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2016-01 "Financial Instruments-Overall (ASC Subtopic 825-10):Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities" ("ASU 2016-01") (See the Adoption of New Pronouncements section below). As a result, the Company measures its equity securities at fair value and recognizes any changes in fair value in net income. Prior to adoption, equity securities were designated as available-for-sale and reported at fair value with unrealized capital gains (losses) recorded in Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) ("AOCI").

The Company's fixed maturities are currently designated as available-for-sale, except those accounted for using the fair value option ("FVO"). Available-for-sale securities are reported at fair value and unrealized capital gains (losses) on these securities are recorded directly in AOCI and presented net of related changes in DAC/VOBA and other intangibles and Deferred income taxes. In addition, certain fixed maturities have embedded derivatives, which are reported with the host contract on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

The Company has elected the FVO for certain of its fixed maturities to better match the measurement of assets and liabilities in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Certain collateralized mortgage obligations ("CMOs"), primarily interest-only and principal-only strips, are accounted for as hybrid instruments and valued at fair value with changes in the fair value recorded in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Purchases and sales of fixed maturities and equity securities, excluding private placements, are recorded on the trade date. Purchases and sales of private placements and mortgage loans are recorded on the closing date. Investment gains and losses on sales of securities are generally determined on a first-in-first-out ("FIFO") basis.

Interest income on fixed maturities is recorded when earned using an effective yield method, giving effect to amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts. Dividends on equity securities are recorded when declared. Such dividends and interest income are recorded in Net investment income in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Included within fixed maturities are loan-backed securities, including residential mortgage-backed securities ("RMBS"), commercial mortgage-backed securities ("CMBS") and asset-backed securities ("ABS"). Amortization of the premium or discount from the purchase of these securities considers the estimated timing and amount of prepayments of the underlying loans. Actual prepayment experience is periodically reviewed and effective yields are recalculated when differences arise between the prepayments originally anticipated and the actual prepayments received and currently anticipated. Prepayment assumptions for single-class and multi-class mortgage-backed securities ("MBS") and ABS are estimated by management using inputs obtained from third-party specialists, including broker-dealers, and based on management's knowledge of the current market. For prepayment-sensitive securities such as interest-only and principal-only strips, inverse floaters and credit-sensitive MBS and ABS securities, which represent beneficial interests in securitized financial assets that are not of high credit quality or that have been credit impaired, the effective yield is recalculated on a prospective basis. For all other MBS and ABS, the effective yield is recalculated on a retrospective basis.

Short-term Investments: Short-term investments include investments with remaining maturities of one year or less, but greater than three months, at the time of purchase. These investments are stated at fair value.

Assets Held in Separate Accounts: Assets held in separate accounts are reported at the fair values of the underlying investments in the separate accounts. The underlying investments include mutual funds, short-term investments, cash and fixed maturities.

Mortgage Loans on Real Estate: The Company's mortgage loans on real estate are all commercial mortgage loans, which are reported at amortized cost, less impairment write-downs and allowance for losses. If a mortgage loan is determined to be impaired (i.e., when it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement), the carrying value of the mortgage loan is reduced to the lower of either the present value of expected cash flows from the loan, discounted at the loan's original purchase yield, or fair value of the collateral. For those mortgages that are determined to require foreclosure, the carrying value is reduced to the fair value of the underlying collateral, net of estimated costs to obtain and sell at the point of foreclosure. The carrying value of the impaired loans is reduced by establishing a permanent write-down recorded in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Property obtained from foreclosed mortgage loans is recorded in Other investments on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Mortgage loans are evaluated by the Company's investment professionals, including an appraisal of loan-specific credit quality, property characteristics and market trends. Loan performance is continuously monitored on a loan-specific basis throughout the year. The Company's review includes submitted appraisals, operating statements, rent revenues and annual inspection reports, among other items. This review evaluates whether the properties are performing at a consistent and acceptable level to secure the debt.

Mortgages are rated for the purpose of quantifying the level of risk. Those loans with higher risk are placed on a watch list and are closely monitored for collateral deficiency or other credit events that may lead to a potential loss of principal or interest. The Company defines delinquent mortgage loans consistent with industry practice as 60 days past due.

Commercial loans are placed on non-accrual status when 90 days in arrears if the Company has concerns regarding the collectability of future payments, or if a loan has matured without being paid off or extended. Factors considered may include conversations with the borrower, loss of major tenant, bankruptcy of borrower or major tenant, decreased property cash flow, number of days past due, or various other circumstances. Based on an assessment as to the collectability of the principal, a determination is made either to apply against the book value or apply according to the contractual terms of the loan. Funds recovered in excess of book value would then be applied to recover expenses, impairments, and then interest. Accrual of interest resumes after factors resulting in doubts about collectability have improved.

The Company records an allowance for probable losses incurred on non-impaired loans on an aggregate basis, rather than specifically identified probable losses incurred by individual loan.

Policy Loans: Policy loans are carried at an amount equal to the unpaid balance. Interest income on such loans is recorded as earned in Net investment income using the contractually agreed upon interest rate. Generally, interest is capitalized on the policy's anniversary date. Valuation allowances are not established for policy loans, as these loans are collateralized by the cash surrender value of the associated insurance contracts. Any unpaid principal or interest on the loan is deducted from the account value or the death benefit prior to settlement of the policy.

Limited Partnerships/Corporations: The Company uses the equity method of accounting for investments in limited partnership interests that are not consolidated, which primarily consist of investments in private equity funds, hedge funds and other VIEs for which the Company is not the primary beneficiary. Generally, the Company records its share of earnings using a lag methodology, relying on the most recent financial information available, generally not to exceed three months. The Company's earnings from limited partnership interests accounted for under the equity method are recorded in Net investment income.

Other Investments: Other investments are comprised primarily of Federal Home Loan Bank ("FHLB") stock and property obtained from foreclosed mortgage loans, as well as other miscellaneous investments. The Company is a member of the FHLB system and is required to own a certain amount of FHLB stock based on the level of borrowings and other factors. FHLB stock is carried at cost, classified as a restricted security and periodically evaluated for impairment based on ultimate recovery of par value.

Securities Lending: The Company engages in securities lending whereby certain securities from its portfolio are loaned to other institutions, through a lending agent, for short periods of time. The Company has the right to approve any institution with whom the lending agent transacts on its behalf. Initial collateral, primarily cash, is required at a rate of 102% of the market value of the loaned securities. The lending agent retains the collateral and invests it in short-term liquid assets on behalf of the Company. The market value of the loaned securities is monitored on a daily basis with additional collateral obtained or refunded as the market value of the loaned securities fluctuates. The lending agent indemnifies the Company against losses resulting from the failure of a counterparty to return securities pledged where collateral is insufficient to cover the loss.

Impairments

The Company evaluates its available-for-sale investments quarterly to determine whether there has been an other-than-temporary decline in fair value below the amortized cost basis. This evaluation process entails considerable judgment and estimation. Factors considered in this analysis include, but are not limited to, the length of time and the extent to which the fair value has been less than amortized cost, the issuer's financial condition and near-term prospects, future economic conditions and market forecasts, interest rate changes and changes in ratings of the security. An extended and severe unrealized loss position on a fixed maturity may not have any impact on: (a) the ability of the issuer to service all scheduled interest and principal payments and (b) the evaluation of recoverability of all contractual cash flows or the ability to recover an amount at least equal to its amortized cost based on the present value of the expected future cash flows to be collected.

When assessing the Company's intent to sell a security, or if it is more likely than not it will be required to sell a security before recovery of its amortized cost basis, management evaluates facts and circumstances such as, but not limited to, decisions to rebalance the investment portfolio and sales of investments to meet cash flow or capital needs.

When the Company has determined it has the intent to sell, or if it is more likely than not that the Company will be required to sell a security before recovery of its amortized cost basis, and the fair value has declined below amortized cost ("intent impairment"), the individual security is written down from amortized cost to fair value, and a corresponding charge is recorded in Net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as an other-than-temporary impairment ("OTTI"). If the Company does not intend to sell the security, and it is not more likely than not that the Company will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost basis, but the Company has determined that there has been an other-than-temporary decline in fair value below the amortized cost basis, the OTTI is bifurcated into the amount representing the present value of the decrease in cash flows expected to be collected ("credit impairment") and the amount related to other factors ("noncredit impairment"). The credit impairment is recorded in Net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. The noncredit impairment is recorded in Other comprehensive income (loss).

The Company uses the following methodology and significant inputs to determine the amount of the OTTI credit loss:

When determining collectability and the period over which the value is expected to recover for U.S. and foreign corporate securities, foreign government securities and state and political subdivision securities, the Company applies the same considerations utilized in its overall impairment evaluation process, which incorporates information regarding the specific security, the industry and geographic area in which the issuer operates and overall macroeconomic conditions. Projected future cash flows are estimated using assumptions derived from the Company's best estimates of likely scenario-based outcomes, after giving consideration to a variety of variables that includes, but is not limited to: general payment terms of the security; the likelihood that the issuer can service the scheduled interest and principal payments; the quality and amount of any credit enhancements; the security's position within the capital structure of the issuer; possible corporate restructurings or asset sales by the issuer; and changes to the rating of the security or the issuer by rating agencies.
Additional considerations are made when assessing the unique features that apply to certain structured securities, such as subprime, Alt-A, non-agency RMBS, CMBS and ABS. These additional factors for structured securities include, but are not limited to: the quality of underlying collateral; expected prepayment speeds; loan-to-value ratios; debt service coverage ratios; current and forecasted loss severity; consideration of the payment terms of the underlying assets backing a particular security; and the payment priority within the tranche structure of the security.
When determining the amount of the credit loss for U.S. and foreign corporate securities, foreign government securities and state and political subdivision securities, the Company considers the estimated fair value as the recovery value when available information does not indicate that another value is more appropriate. When information is identified that indicates a recovery value other than estimated fair value, the Company considers in the determination of recovery value the same considerations utilized in its overall impairment evaluation process, which incorporates available information and the Company's best estimate of scenario-based outcomes regarding the specific security and issuer; possible corporate restructurings or asset sales by the issuer; the quality and amount of any credit enhancements; the security's position within the capital structure of the issuer; fundamentals of the industry and geographic area in which the security issuer operates; and the overall macroeconomic conditions.
The Company performs a discounted cash flow analysis comparing the current amortized cost of a security to the present value of future cash flows expected to be received, including estimated defaults and prepayments. The discount rate is generally the effective interest rate of the fixed maturity prior to impairment.

In periods subsequent to the recognition of the credit related impairment components of OTTI on a fixed maturity, the Company accounts for the impaired security as if it had been purchased on the measurement date of the impairment. Accordingly, the discount (or reduced premium) based on the new cost basis is accreted into Net investment income over the remaining term of the fixed maturity in a prospective manner based on the amount and timing of estimated future cash flows.

Derivatives

The Company's use of derivatives is limited mainly to economic hedging to reduce the Company's exposure to cash flow variability of assets and liabilities, interest rate risk, credit risk, exchange rate risk and market risk. It is the Company's policy not to offset amounts recognized for derivative instruments and amounts recognized for the right to reclaim cash collateral or the obligation to return cash collateral arising from derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting arrangement.

The Company enters into interest rate, equity market, credit default and currency contracts, including swaps, futures, forwards, caps, floors and options, to reduce and manage various risks associated with changes in value, yield, price, cash flow or exchange rates of assets or liabilities held or intended to be held, or to assume or reduce credit exposure associated with a referenced asset, index or pool. The Company also utilizes options and futures on equity indices to reduce and manage risks associated with its universal life-type and annuity products. Derivative contracts are reported as Derivatives assets or liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheets at fair value. Changes in the fair value of derivatives are recorded in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

To qualify for hedge accounting, at the inception of the hedging relationship, the Company formally documents its risk management objective and strategy for undertaking the hedging transaction, as well as its designation of the hedge as either (a) a hedge of the exposure to changes in the estimated fair value of a recognized asset or liability or an identified portion thereof that is attributable to a particular risk ("fair value hedge") or (b) a hedge of a forecasted transaction or of the variability of cash flows that is attributable to interest rate risk to be received or paid related to a recognized asset or liability ("cash flow hedge"). In this documentation, the Company sets forth how the hedging instrument is expected to hedge the designated risks related to the hedged item and sets forth
the method that will be used to retrospectively and prospectively assess the hedging instrument's effectiveness and the method that will be used to measure ineffectiveness. A derivative designated as a hedging instrument must be assessed as being highly effective in offsetting the designated risk of the hedged item. Hedge effectiveness is formally assessed at inception and periodically throughout the life of the designated hedging relationship.

Fair Value Hedge: For derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as a fair value hedge, the gain or loss on the derivative instrument, as well as the hedged item, to the extent of the risk being hedged, are recognized in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Cash Flow Hedge: For derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as a cash flow hedge, the effective portion of the gain or loss on the derivative instrument is reported as a component of AOCI and reclassified into earnings in the same periods during which the hedged transaction impacts earnings in the same line item associated with the forecasted transaction. The ineffective portion of the derivative's change in value, if any, along with any of the derivative's change in value that is excluded from the assessment of hedge effectiveness, are recorded in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

When hedge accounting is discontinued because it is determined that the derivative is no longer expected to be highly effective in offsetting changes in the estimated fair value or cash flows of a hedged item, the derivative continues to be carried on the Consolidated Balance Sheets at its estimated fair value, with subsequent changes in estimated fair value recognized currently in Other net realized capital gains (losses). The carrying value of the hedged asset or liability under a fair value hedge is no longer adjusted for changes in its estimated fair value due to the hedged risk, and the cumulative adjustment to its carrying value is amortized into income over the remaining life of the hedged item. Provided the hedged forecasted transaction is still probable of occurrence, the changes in estimated fair value of derivatives recorded in Other comprehensive income (loss) related to discontinued cash flow hedges are released into the Consolidated Statements of Operations when the Company's earnings are affected by the variability in cash flows of the hedged item.

When hedge accounting is discontinued because it is no longer probable that the forecasted transactions will occur on the anticipated date, or within two months of that date, the derivative continues to be carried on the Consolidated Balance Sheets at its estimated fair value, with changes in estimated fair value recognized currently in Other net realized capital gains (losses). Derivative gains and losses recorded in Other comprehensive income (loss) pursuant to the discontinued cash flow hedge of a forecasted transaction that is no longer probable are recognized immediately in Other net realized capital gains (losses).

The Company also has investments in certain fixed maturities and has issued certain universal life-type and annuity products that contain embedded derivatives for which fair value is at least partially determined by levels of or changes in domestic and/or foreign interest rates (short-term or long-term), exchange rates, prepayment rates, equity markets or credit ratings/spreads. Embedded derivatives within fixed maturities are included with the host contract on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, and changes in the fair value of the embedded derivatives are recorded in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Embedded derivatives within certain universal life-type and annuity products are included in Future policy benefits on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, and changes in the fair value of the embedded derivatives are recorded in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

In addition, the Company has entered into coinsurance with funds withheld reinsurance arrangements that contain embedded derivatives, the fair value of which is based on the change in the fair value of the underlying assets held in trust. The embedded derivatives within coinsurance with funds withheld reinsurance arrangements are reported with the host contract in Other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, and changes in the fair value of embedded derivatives are recorded in Policyholder benefits in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, amounts due from banks and other highly liquid investments, such as money market instruments and debt instruments with maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase. Cash and cash equivalents are stated at fair value. Cash and cash equivalents of VIEs and VOEs are not available for general use by the Company.

Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs, Value of Business Acquired and Other Intangibles

DAC represents policy acquisition costs that have been capitalized and are subject to amortization and interest. Capitalized costs are incremental, direct costs of contract acquisition and certain other costs related directly to successful acquisition activities. Such costs consist principally of commissions, underwriting, sales and contract issuance and processing expenses directly related to the successful acquisition of new and renewal business. Indirect or unsuccessful acquisition costs, maintenance, product development and overhead expenses are charged to expense as incurred. VOBA represents the outstanding value of in-force business acquired and is subject to amortization and interest. The value is based on the present value of estimated net cash flows embedded in the insurance contracts at the time of the acquisition and increased for subsequent deferrable expenses on purchased policies.

Collectively, the Company refers to DAC, VOBA, deferred sales inducements ("DSI") and unearned revenue ("URR") as "DAC/VOBA and other intangibles." (See respective "Sales Inducements" and "Recognition of Insurance Revenue and Related Benefits" sections below). DAC/VOBA and other intangibles are adjusted for the impact of unrealized capital gains (losses) on investments, as if such gains (losses) have been realized, with corresponding adjustments included in AOCI.

Amortization Methodologies
The Company amortizes DAC and VOBA related to certain traditional life insurance contracts and certain accident and health insurance contracts over the premium payment period in proportion to the present value of expected gross premiums. Assumptions as to mortality, morbidity, persistency and interest rates, which include provisions for adverse deviation, are consistent with the assumptions used to calculate reserves for future policy benefits.

These assumptions are "locked-in" at issue and not revised unless the DAC or VOBA balance is deemed to be unrecoverable from future expected profits. Recoverability testing is performed for current issue year products to determine if gross premiums are sufficient to cover DAC or VOBA, estimated benefits and related expenses. In subsequent periods, the recoverability of DAC or VOBA is determined by assessing whether future gross premiums are sufficient to amortize DAC or VOBA, as well as provide for expected future benefits and related expenses. If a premium deficiency is deemed to be present, charges will be applied against the DAC and VOBA balances before an additional reserve is established. Absent such a premium deficiency, variability in amortization after policy issuance or acquisition relates only to variability in premium volumes.

The Company amortizes DAC and VOBA related to universal life-type contracts and fixed and variable deferred annuity contracts over the estimated lives of the contracts in relation to the emergence of estimated gross profits. Assumptions as to mortality, persistency, interest crediting rates, fee income, returns associated with separate account performance, impact of hedge performance, expenses to administer the business and certain economic variables, such as inflation, are based on the Company's experience and overall capital markets. At each valuation date, estimated gross profits are updated with actual gross profits, and the assumptions underlying future estimated gross profits are evaluated for continued reasonableness. Adjustments to estimated gross profits require that amortization rates be revised retroactively to the date of the contract issuance ("unlocking").

For universal life-type contracts and fixed and variable deferred annuity contracts, recoverability testing is performed for current issue year products to determine if gross profits are sufficient to cover DAC/VOBA and other intangibles, estimated benefits and related expenses. In subsequent years, the Company performs testing to assess the recoverability of DAC/VOBA and other intangibles on an annual basis, or more frequently if circumstances indicate a potential loss recognition issue exists. If DAC/VOBA or other intangibles are not deemed recoverable from future gross profits, charges will be applied against the DAC/VOBA or other intangible balances before an additional reserve is established.

Internal Replacements
Contract owners may periodically exchange one contract for another, or make modifications to an existing contract. These transactions are identified as internal replacements. Internal replacements that are determined to result in substantially unchanged contracts are accounted for as continuations of the replaced contracts. Any costs associated with the issuance of the new contracts are considered maintenance costs and expensed as incurred. Unamortized DAC/VOBA and other intangibles related to the replaced contracts continue to be deferred and amortized in connection with the new contracts. Internal replacements that are determined to result in contracts that are substantially changed are accounted for as extinguishments of the replaced contracts, and any unamortized DAC/VOBA and other intangibles related to the replaced contracts are written off to the same account in which amortization is reported in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Assumptions
Changes in assumptions can have a significant impact on DAC/VOBA and other intangible balances, amortization rates, reserve levels, and results of operations. Assumptions are management’s best estimate of future outcome.

Several assumptions are considered significant in the estimation of gross profits associated with the Company's variable products. One significant assumption is the assumed return associated with the variable account performance. To reflect the volatility in the equity markets, this assumption involves a combination of near-term expectations and long-term assumptions regarding market performance. The overall return on the variable account is dependent on multiple factors, including the relative mix of the underlying sub-accounts among bond funds and equity funds, as well as equity sector weightings. The Company uses a reversion to the mean approach, which assumes that the market returns over the entire mean reversion period are consistent with a long-term level of equity market appreciation. The Company monitors market events and only changes the assumption when sustained deviations are expected. This methodology incorporates a 9% long-term equity return assumption, a 14% cap and a five-year look-forward period.

Other significant assumptions used in the estimation of gross profits include mortality, and for products with credited rates include interest rate spreads and credit losses. Estimated gross revenues and gross profits of variable annuity contracts are sensitive to mortality and estimated policyholder behavior assumptions, such as surrender, lapse and annuitization rates.

Contract Costs Associated with Certain Financial Services Contracts

Contract cost assets represent costs incurred to obtain or fulfill a non-insurance financial services contract that are expected to be recovered and, thus, have been capitalized and are subject to amortization. Capitalized contract costs include incremental costs of obtaining a contract and fulfillment costs that relate directly to a contract and generate or enhance resources of the Company that are used to satisfy performance obligations.

The Company defers (1) incremental commissions and variable compensation paid to the Company's direct sales force, consultant channel, and intermediary partners, as a result of obtaining certain financial services contracts and (2) account set-up expenses on certain recordkeeping contracts. The Company expenses as incurred deferrable contract costs for which the amortization period would be one year or less and other contract-related costs. The Company periodically reviews contract cost assets for impairment. Capitalized contract costs are included in Other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, and costs expensed as incurred are included in Operating expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

As of December 31, 2018, contract cost assets were $108. Capitalized contract costs are amortized on a straight-line basis over the estimated lives of the contracts, which typically range from 5 to 15 years. This method is consistent with the transfer of services to which the assets relate. For the year ended December 31, 2018, amortization expense of $24 was recorded in Operating expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations. There was no impairment loss in relation to the contract costs capitalized.

Future Policy Benefits and Contract Owner Account Balances

Future Policy Benefits
The Company establishes and carries actuarially-determined reserves that are calculated to meet its future obligations, including estimates of unpaid claims and claims that the Company believes have been incurred but have not yet been reported as of the balance sheet date. The principal assumptions used to establish liabilities for future policy benefits are based on Company experience and periodically reviewed against industry standards. These assumptions include mortality, morbidity, policy lapse, contract renewal, payment of subsequent premiums or deposits by the contract owner, retirement, investment returns, inflation, benefit utilization and expenses. Changes in, or deviations from, the assumptions used can significantly affect the Company's reserve levels and related results of operations.

Reserves for traditional life insurance contracts (term insurance, participating and non-participating whole life insurance and traditional group life insurance) and accident and health insurance represent the present value of future benefits to be paid to or on behalf of contract owners and related expenses, less the present value of future net premiums. Assumptions as to interest rates, mortality, expenses and persistency are based on the Company's estimates of anticipated experience at the period the policy is sold or acquired, including a provision for adverse deviation. Interest rates used to calculate the present value of these reserves ranged from 2.3% to 7.7%.
Reserves for payout contracts with life contingencies are equal to the present value of expected future payments. Assumptions as to interest rates, mortality and expenses are based on the Company's estimates of anticipated experience at the period the policy is sold or acquired, including a provision for adverse deviation. Such assumptions generally vary by annuity plan type, year of issue and policy duration. Interest rates used to calculate the present value of future benefits ranged from 2.7% to 8.0%.

Although assumptions are "locked-in" upon the issuance of traditional life insurance contracts, certain accident and health insurance contracts and payout contracts with life contingencies, significant changes in experience or assumptions may require the Company to provide for expected future losses on a product by establishing premium deficiency reserves. Premium deficiency reserves are determined based on best estimate assumptions that exist at the time the premium deficiency reserve is established and do not include a provision for adverse deviation.

During the year ended December 31, 2017, as a result of the held for sale classification of substantially all of the Annuities and CBVA businesses discussed above, the Company has evaluated and redefined its contract groupings for loss recognition testing in those businesses. This has resulted in the establishment of premium deficiency reserves for the Retained Business of $43, which was recorded as an increase in Policyholder benefits in the Consolidated Statement of Operations, with a corresponding increase to Future policy benefits on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

Contract Owner Account Balances
Contract owner account balances relate to universal life-type and investment-type contracts, as follows:

Account balances for funding agreements with fixed maturities are calculated using the amount deposited with the Company, less withdrawals, plus interest accrued to the ending valuation date. Interest on these contracts is accrued by a predetermined index, plus a spread or a fixed rate, established at the issue date of the contract.
Account balances for universal life-type contracts, including variable universal life ("VUL") contracts, are equal to cumulative deposits, less charges, withdrawals and account values released upon death, plus credited interest thereon.
Account balances for fixed annuities and payout contracts without life contingencies are equal to cumulative deposits, less charges and withdrawals, plus credited interest thereon. Credited interest rates vary by product and ranged up to 7.5% for the years 2018, 2017 and 2016. Account balances for group immediate annuities without life contingent payouts are equal to the discounted value of the payment at the implied break-even rate.
For fixed-indexed annuity ("FIA") and indexed universal life ("IUL") contracts, the aggregate initial liability is equal to the deposit received, plus a bonus, if applicable, and is split into a host component and an embedded derivative component. Thereafter, the host liability accumulates at a set interest rate, and the embedded derivative liability is recognized at fair value.

Product Guarantees and Additional Reserves
The Company calculates additional reserve liabilities for certain universal life-type products, certain variable annuity guaranteed benefits and variable funding products. The Company periodically evaluates its estimates and adjusts the additional liability balance, with a related charge or credit to benefit expense, if actual experience or other evidence suggests that earlier assumptions should be revised. Changes in, or deviations from, the assumptions used can significantly affect the Company's reserve levels and related results of operations.

Universal and Variable Life: Reserves for universal life ("UL") and VUL secondary guarantees and paid-up guarantees are calculated by estimating the expected value of death benefits payable and recognizing those benefits ratably over the accumulation period based on total expected assessments. The reserve for such products recognizes the portion of contract assessments received in early years used to compensate the Company for benefits provided in later years. Assumptions used, such as the interest rate, lapse rate and mortality, are consistent with assumptions used in estimating gross profits for purposes of amortizing DAC. Reserves for UL and VUL secondary guarantees and paid-up guarantees are recorded in Future policy benefits on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

The Company also calculates a benefit ratio for each block of business that meets the requirements for additional reserves and calculates an additional reserve by accumulating amounts equal to the benefit ratio multiplied by the assessments for each period, reduced by excess benefits during the period. The additional reserve is accumulated at interest rates consistent with the DAC model for the period. The calculated reserve includes provisions for UL contracts that produce expected gains from the insurance benefit
function followed by losses from that function in later years. Additional reserves are recorded in Future policy benefits on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

URR relates to UL and VUL products and represents policy charges for benefits or services to be provided in future periods (see "Recognition of Insurance Revenue and Related Benefits" below). The URR balance is recorded in Contract owner account balances on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

GMDB and GMIB: Reserves for annuity guaranteed minimum death benefits ("GMDB") and guaranteed minimum income benefits ("GMIB") are determined by estimating the value of expected benefits in excess of the projected account balance and recognizing the excess ratably over the accumulation period based on total expected assessments. Expected experience is based on a range of scenarios. Assumptions used, such as the long-term equity market return, lapse rate and mortality, are consistent with assumptions used in estimating gross revenues for the purpose of amortizing DAC. The assumptions of investment performance and volatility are consistent with the historical experience of the appropriate underlying equity index, such as the Standard & Poor's ("S&P") 500 Index. In addition, the reserve for the GMIB incorporates assumptions for the likelihood and timing of the potential annuitizations that may be elected by the contract owner. In general, the Company assumes that GMIB annuitization rates will be higher for policies with more valuable ("in the money") guarantees, where the notional benefit amount is in excess of the account value. Reserves for GMDB and GMIB are recorded in Future policy benefits. Changes in reserves for GMDB and GMIB are reported in Policyholder benefits.

GMWBL, GMWB, FIA and IUL: The Company issues certain products that contain embedded derivatives that are measured at estimated fair value separately from the host contracts. These products include deferred variable annuity contracts containing guaranteed minimum withdrawal benefits with life payouts ("GMWBL") and guaranteed minimum withdrawal benefits without life contingencies ("GMWB") features and FIA and IUL contracts. Embedded derivatives associated with GMWB and GMWBL are recorded in Future policy benefits. Embedded derivatives associated with FIA and IUL contracts are recorded in Contract owner account balances. Changes in estimated fair value, that are not related to attributed fees or premiums collected or payments made, are reported in Other net realized capital gains (losses).

At inception of the contracts containing the GMWBL and GMWB features, the Company projects a fee to be attributed to the embedded derivative portion of the guarantee equal to the present value of projected future guaranteed benefits. After inception, the estimated fair value of the GMWBL and GMWB embedded derivatives is determined based on the present value of projected future guaranteed benefits, minus the present value of projected attributed fees. A risk neutral valuation methodology is used under which the cash flows from the guarantees are projected under multiple capital market scenarios using observable risk free rates. The projection of future guaranteed benefits and future attributed fees requires the use of assumptions for capital markets (e.g., implied volatilities, correlation among indices, risk-free swap curve, etc.) and policyholder behavior (e.g., lapse, benefit utilization, mortality, etc.).

The estimated fair value of the embedded derivative in the FIA contracts is based on the present value of the excess of interest payments to the contract owners over the growth in the minimum guaranteed contract value. The excess interest payments are determined as the excess of projected index driven benefits over the projected guaranteed benefits. The projection horizon is over the anticipated life of the related contracts, which takes into account best estimate actuarial assumptions, such as partial withdrawals, full surrenders, deaths, annuitizations and maturities.

The estimated fair value of the embedded derivative in the IUL contracts is based on the present value of the excess of interest payments to the contract owners over the growth in the minimum guaranteed account value. The excess interest payments are determined as the excess of projected index driven benefits over the projected guaranteed benefits. The projection horizon is over the current index term of the related contracts, which takes into account best estimate actuarial assumptions, such as partial withdrawals, full surrenders, deaths and maturities.

Stabilizer and MCG: Guaranteed credited rates give rise to an embedded derivative in the Stabilizer products and a stand-alone derivative for managed custody guarantee products ("MCG"). These derivatives are measured at estimated fair value and recorded in Contract owner account balances on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Changes in estimated fair value, that are not related to attributed fees collected or payments made, are reported in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

The estimated fair value of the Stabilizer embedded derivative and MCG stand-alone derivative is determined based on the present value of projected future claims, minus the present value of future guaranteed premiums. At inception of the contract, the Company projects a guaranteed premium to be equal to the present value of the projected future claims. The income associated with the contracts is projected using actuarial and capital market assumptions, including benefits and related contract charges, over the anticipated life of the related contracts. The cash flow estimates are projected under multiple capital market scenarios using observable risk-free rates and other best estimate assumptions.

The liabilities for the GMWBL, GMWB, FIA, IUL and Stabilizer embedded derivatives and the MCG stand-alone derivative (collectively, "guaranteed benefit derivatives") include a risk margin to capture uncertainties related to policyholder behavior assumptions. The margin represents additional compensation a market participant would require to assume these risks.

The discount rate used to determine the fair value of the liabilities for the GMWBL, GMWB, FIA, IUL and Stabilizer embedded derivatives and the MCG stand-alone derivative includes an adjustment to reflect the risk that these obligations will not be fulfilled ("nonperformance risk").

Separate Accounts

Separate account assets and liabilities generally represent funds maintained to meet specific investment objectives of contract owners or participants who bear the investment risk, subject, in limited cases, to minimum guaranteed rates. Investment income and investment gains and losses generally accrue directly to such contract owners. The assets of each account are legally segregated and are not subject to claims that arise out of any other business of the Company.

Separate account assets supporting variable options under variable annuity contracts are invested, as designated by the contract owner or participant under a contract, in shares of mutual funds that are managed by the Company or in other selected mutual funds not managed by the Company.

The Company reports separately, as assets and liabilities, investments held in the separate accounts and liabilities of separate accounts if:

Such separate accounts are legally recognized;
Assets supporting the contract liabilities are legally insulated from the Company's general account liabilities;
Investments are directed by the contract owner or participant; and
All investment performance, net of contract fees and assessments, is passed through to the contract owner.

The Company reports separate account assets that meet the above criteria at fair value on the Consolidated Balance Sheets based on the fair value of the underlying investments. Separate account liabilities equal separate account assets. Investment income and net realized and unrealized capital gains (losses) of the separate accounts, however, are not reflected in the Consolidated Statements of Operations, and the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows do not reflect investment activity of the separate accounts.

Short-term and Long-term Debt

Short-term and long-term debt are carried on the Consolidated Balance Sheets at an amount equal to the unpaid principal balance, net of any remaining unamortized discount or premium and any direct and incremental costs attributable to issuance. Discounts, premiums and direct and incremental costs are amortized as a component of Interest expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations over the life of the debt using the effective interest method of amortization.

Repurchase Agreements

The Company engages in dollar repurchase agreements with MBS ("dollar rolls") and repurchase agreements with other collateral types to increase its return on investments and improve liquidity. Such arrangements meet the requirements to be accounted for as financing arrangements.

The Company enters into dollar roll transactions by selling existing MBS and concurrently entering into an agreement to repurchase similar securities within a short time frame at a lower price. Under repurchase agreements, the Company borrows cash from a counterparty at an agreed upon interest rate for an agreed upon time frame and pledges collateral in the form of securities. At the
end of the agreement, the counterparty returns the collateral to the Company, and the Company, in turn, repays the loan amount along with the additional agreed upon interest.

The Company's policy requires that at all times during the term of the dollar roll and repurchase agreements that cash or other collateral types obtained is sufficient to allow the Company to fund substantially all of the cost of purchasing replacement assets. Cash received is generally invested in Short-term investments, with the offsetting obligation to repay the loan included within Payables under securities loan and repurchase agreements, including collateral held on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The carrying value of the securities pledged in dollar rolls and repurchase agreement transactions is included in Securities pledged on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

The primary risk associated with short-term collateralized borrowings is that the counterparty will be unable to perform under the terms of the contract. The Company's exposure is limited to the excess of the net replacement cost of the securities over the value of the short-term investments. The Company believes the counterparties to the dollar rolls and repurchase agreements are financially responsible and that the counterparty risk is minimal. 

Recognition of Revenue

Insurance Revenue and Related Benefits
Premiums related to traditional life insurance contracts and payout contracts with life contingencies are recognized in Premiums in the Consolidated Statements of Operations when due from the contract owner. When premiums are due over a significantly shorter period than the period over which benefits are provided, any gross premium in excess of the net premium (i.e., the portion of the gross premium required to provide for expected future benefits and expenses) is deferred and recognized into revenue in a constant relationship to insurance in force. Benefits are recorded in Policyholder benefits in the Consolidated Statements of Operations when incurred.

Amounts received as payment for investment-type, universal life-type, fixed annuities, payout contracts without life contingencies and FIA contracts are reported as deposits to contract owner account balances. Revenues from these contracts consist primarily of fees assessed against the contract owner account balance for mortality and policy administration charges and are reported in Fee income. Surrender charges are reported in Other revenue. In addition, the Company earns investment income from the investment of contract deposits in the Company's general account portfolio, which is reported in Net investment income in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Fees assessed that represent compensation to the Company for services to be provided in future periods and certain other fees are established as a URR liability and amortized into revenue over the expected life of the related contracts in proportion to estimated gross profits in a manner consistent with DAC for these contracts. URR is reported in Contract owner account balances and amortized into Fee income. Benefits and expenses for these products include claims in excess of related account balances, expenses of contract administration and interest credited to contract owner account balances.

Performance-based Capital Allocations on Private Equity Funds
Under asset management arrangements for certain of its sponsored private equity funds, the Company, as General Partner, is entitled to receive performance-based capital allocations ("carried interest") when the return on assets under management for such funds exceeds prescribed investment return hurdles or other performance targets. Carried interest is accrued quarterly based on measuring cumulative fund performance against the stated performance hurdle, as if the fund was liquidated at its estimated fair value as of the applicable balance sheet date.

Carried interest is subject to adjustment to the extent that subsequent fund performance causes the fund’s cumulative investment return to fall below specified investment return hurdles. In such a circumstance, some or all of the previously accrued carried interest is reversed to the extent that the Company is no longer entitled to the performance-based capital allocation and, if such allocations have been distributed to the Company but are subject to recoupment by the fund, a liability is established for the potential repayment obligation.

Financial Services Revenue
Revenue for various financial services is measured based on consideration specified in a contract with a customer and excludes any amounts collected on behalf of third parties. For advisory, asset management, and recordkeeping and administration services, the Company recognizes revenue as services are provided, generally over time. In addition, the Company may arrange for sub-advisory services for a customer under certain contracts. Revenue is recognized when the Company has satisfied a performance
obligation by transferring control of a service to a customer. Contract terms are typically less than one year, and consideration is generally variable and due as services are rendered.

For distribution and shareholder servicing revenue, the Company provides distribution services at a point in time and shareholder services over time. Such revenue is recognized when the Company has satisfied a performance obligation and related consideration is received. Contract terms are less than one year, and consideration is variable. For distribution services, revenue may be recognized in periods subsequent to when the Company has satisfied a performance obligation, as a component of related consideration is constrained under certain contracts.

For a description of principal activities by reportable segment from which the Company generates revenue, see the Segments Note in these Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

Revenue for various financial services is recorded in Fee income or Other revenue in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Financial services revenue is disaggregated by type of service in the following tables. For the year ended December 31, 2018, such revenue represents approximately 28.4% of total Retirement revenue, all of Investment Management revenue, and 17.3% of Corporate revenue. Such revenue is immaterial for Employee Benefits and Individual Life. For the year ended December 31, 2018, a portion of the revenue recognized in the current period from distribution services is related to performance obligations satisfied in previous periods.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31, 2018
 
Reportable Segments
 
 
 
Retirement
 
Investment Management
 
Corporate
Service Line
 
 
 
 
 
Advisory
$
224

 
$
556

 
$

Asset management

 
159

 

Recordkeeping & administration
339

 
141

 
7

Distribution & shareholder servicing
260

 
178

 
31

Total financial services revenue
$
823

 
$
1,034

 
$
38



Receivables of $237 are included in Other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31, 2018.

Income Taxes

The Company files a consolidated federal income tax return, which includes many of its subsidiaries, in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

Items required by tax regulations to be included in the tax return may differ from the items reflected in the financial statements. As a result, the effective tax rate reflected in the financial statements may be different than the actual rate applied on the tax return. Some of these differences are permanent, such as the dividends received deduction which is estimated using information from the prior period and current year results. Other differences are temporary, reversing over time, such as the valuation of insurance reserves, and create deferred tax assets and liabilities.

The Company's deferred tax assets and liabilities resulting from temporary differences between financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities are measured at the balance sheet date using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years the temporary differences are expected to reverse.

Deferred tax assets represent the tax benefit of future deductible temporary differences, net operating loss carryforwards and tax credit carryforwards. The Company evaluates and tests the recoverability of its deferred tax assets. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance if, based on the weight of evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion, or all, of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Considerable judgment and the use of estimates are required in determining whether a valuation
allowance is necessary and, if so, the amount of such valuation allowance. In evaluating the need for a valuation allowance, the Company considers many factors, including:

The nature, frequency and severity of book income or losses in recent years;
The nature and character of the deferred tax assets and liabilities;
The nature and character of income by life and non-life subgroups;
The recent cumulative book income (loss) position after adjustment for permanent differences;
Taxable income in prior carryback years;
Projected future taxable income, exclusive of reversing temporary differences and carryforwards;
Projected future reversals of existing temporary differences;
The length of time carryforwards can be utilized;
Prudent and feasible tax planning strategies the Company would employ to avoid a tax benefit from expiring unused; and
Tax rules that would impact the utilization of the deferred tax assets.

In establishing unrecognized tax benefits, the Company determines whether a tax position is more likely than not to be sustained under examination by the appropriate taxing authority. The Company also considers positions that have been reviewed and agreed to as part of an examination by the appropriate taxing authority. Tax positions that do not meet the more likely than not standard are not recognized in the Consolidated Financial Statements. Tax positions that meet this standard are recognized in the Consolidated Financial Statements. The Company measures the tax position as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate resolution with the tax authority that has full knowledge of all relevant information.

Reinsurance

The Company utilizes reinsurance agreements in most aspects of its insurance business to reduce its exposure to large losses. Such reinsurance permits recovery of a portion of losses from reinsurers, although it does not discharge the primary liability of the Company as direct insurer of the risks reinsured.

For each of its reinsurance agreements, the Company determines whether the agreement provides indemnification against loss or liability relating to insurance risk. The Company reviews contractual features, particularly those that may limit the amount of insurance risk to which the reinsurer is subject or features that delay the timely reimbursement of claims. The assumptions used to account for both long and short-duration reinsurance agreements are consistent with those used for the underlying contracts. Ceded Future policy benefits and Contract owner account balances are reported gross on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Long-duration: For reinsurance of long-duration contracts that transfer significant insurance risk, the difference, if any, between the amounts paid and benefits received related to the underlying contracts is included in the expected net cost of reinsurance, which is recorded as a component of the reinsurance asset or liability. Any difference between actual and expected net cost of reinsurance is recognized in the current period and included as a component of profits used to amortize DAC.

Short-duration: For prospective reinsurance of short-duration contracts that meet the criteria for reinsurance accounting, amounts paid are recorded as ceded premiums and ceded unearned premiums and are reflected as a component of Premiums in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, respectively. Ceded unearned premiums are amortized through premiums over the remaining contract period in proportion to the amount of protection provided.

For retroactive reinsurance of short-duration contracts that meet the criteria for reinsurance accounting, amounts paid in excess of the related insurance liabilities ceded are recognized immediately as a loss. Any gains on such retroactive agreements are deferred in Other liabilities and amortized over the remaining life of the underlying contracts.

Accounting for reinsurance requires use of assumptions and estimates, particularly related to the future performance of the underlying business and the potential impact of counterparty credit risks. The Company periodically reviews actual and anticipated experience compared to the assumptions used to establish assets and liabilities relating to ceded and assumed reinsurance. The Company also evaluates the financial strength of potential reinsurers and continually monitors the financial condition of reinsurers. The S&P ratings for the Company's reinsurers with the largest reinsurance recoverable balances are A-rated or better, including Lincoln National Corporation ("Lincoln"), Hannover Life Reassurance Company of America ("Hannover US") and Hannover Re (Ireland) Limited ("HLRI") (collectively, "Hannover Re") and various subsidiaries of Reinsurance Group of America Incorporated (collectively, "RGA").

Only those reinsurance recoverable balances deemed probable of recovery are recognized as assets on the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheets and are stated net of allowances for uncollectible reinsurance. Amounts currently recoverable and payable under reinsurance agreements are included in Premium receivable and reinsurance recoverable. Such assets and liabilities relating to reinsurance agreements with the same reinsurer are recorded net on the Consolidated Balance Sheets if a right of offset exists within the reinsurance agreement. Premiums, Fee income and Policyholder benefits are reported net of reinsurance ceded. Amounts received from reinsurers for policy administration are reported in Other revenue.

The Company has entered into coinsurance funds withheld reinsurance arrangements that contain embedded derivatives for which carrying value is estimated based on the change in the fair value of the assets supporting the funds withheld payable under the agreements.

Employee Benefits Plans

The Company sponsors and/or administers various plans that provide defined benefit pension and other postretirement benefit plans covering eligible employees, sales representatives and other individuals. The plans are generally funded through payments, determined by periodic actuarial calculations, to trustee-administered funds.

A defined benefit plan is a pension plan that defines an amount of pension benefit that an employee will receive upon retirement, usually dependent on one or more factors such as age, years of service and compensation. The liability recognized in respect of defined benefit pension plans is the present value of the projected pension benefit obligation ("PBO") at the balance sheet date, less the fair value of plan assets, together with adjustments for unrecognized past service costs. This liability is included in Pension and other postretirement provisions on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The PBO is defined as the actuarially calculated present value of vested and non-vested pension benefits accrued based on future salary levels. The Company recognizes the funded status of the PBO for pension plans and the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation ("APBO") for other postretirement plans on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Net periodic benefit cost is determined using management estimates and actuarial assumptions to derive service cost, interest cost and expected return on plan assets for a particular year. The obligations and expenses associated with these plans require use of assumptions, such as discount rate, expected rate of return on plan assets, rate of future compensation increases and healthcare cost trend rates, as well as assumptions regarding participant demographics, such as age of retirements, withdrawal rates and mortality. Management determines these assumptions based on a variety of factors, such as historical performance of the plan and its assets, currently available market and industry data and expected benefit payout streams. Actual results could vary significantly from assumptions based on changes, such as economic and market conditions, demographics of participants in the plans and amendments to benefits provided under the plans. These differences may have a significant effect on the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements and liquidity. Differences between the expected return and the actual return on plan assets and actuarial gains (losses) are immediately recognized in Operating expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

For postretirement healthcare and other benefits to retirees, the entitlement to these benefits is usually conditional on the employee remaining in service up to retirement age and the completion of a minimum service period. The expected costs of these benefits are accrued in Pension and other postretirement provisions over the period of employment using an accounting methodology similar to that for defined benefit pension plans. Actuarial gains (losses) are immediately recognized in Operating expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Share-based Compensation

The Company grants certain employees and directors share-based compensation awards under various plans. Share-based compensation plans are subject to certain vesting conditions. The Company measures the cost of its share-based awards at their grant date fair value, which in the case of restricted stock units ("RSUs ") and performance share units ("PSUs") is based upon the market value of the Company's common stock on the date of grant. The Company grants certain PSU awards, which are subject to attainment of specified total shareholder return ("TSR") targets relative to a specified peer group. The number of TSR-based PSU awards expected to be earned, based on achievement of the market condition, is factored into the grant date Monte Carlo valuation for the award. Fair value of stock options is determined using a Black-Scholes options valuation methodology. Compensation expense is principally related to the granting of performance share units, restricted stock units and stock options
and is recognized in Operating expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations over the requisite service period. The majority of awards granted are provided in the first quarter of each year.

The liability related to cash-settled awards is recorded within Other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Unlike equity-settled awards, which have a fixed grant-date fair value, the fair value of unvested cash-settled awards is remeasured at the end of each reporting period until the awards vest.

Excess tax benefits recorded in Additional paid-in capital in 2016 and prior years are accounted for in a single pool available to all share-based compensation awards. Excess tax benefits in Additional paid-in capital are not recognized until the benefits result in a reduction in taxes payable. The Company uses tax law ordering when determining when excess tax benefits have been realized.

On a prospective basis from January 1, 2017, all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies related to share-based compensation are reported in Net income (loss), rather than Additional paid-in capital.

Earnings per Common Share

Basic earnings per common share ("EPS") is computed by dividing earnings available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS is computed assuming the issuance of nonvested shares, restricted stock units, stock options, performance share units and warrants using the treasury stock method. Basic and diluted earnings per share are calculated using unrounded, actual amounts. Under the treasury stock method, the Company utilizes the average market price to determine the amount of cash that would be available to repurchase shares if the common shares vested. The net incremental share count issued represents the potential dilutive or anti-dilutive securities.

For any period where a loss from earnings available to common shareholders is experienced, shares used in the diluted EPS calculation represent basic shares, as using diluted shares would be anti-dilutive to the calculation.

Consolidation and Noncontrolling Interests

As of January 1, 2016, the Company changed its method for determining whether consolidation is required for VIEs and VOEs upon the adoption of Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2015-02, "Consolidation (Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") Topic 810): Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis" ("ASU 2015-02").

In the normal course of business, the Company invests in, provides investment management services to, and has transactions with, various CLO entities, private equity funds, real estate funds, funds-of-hedge funds, single strategy hedge funds, insurance entities, securitizations and other investment entities. In certain instances, the Company serves as the investment manager, making day-to-day investment decisions concerning the assets of these entities. These entities are considered to be either VIEs or VOEs, and the consolidation guidance requires an assessment involving judgments and analysis to determine (a) whether an entity in which the Company holds a variable interest is a VIE and (b) whether the Company's involvement, through holding interests directly or indirectly in the entity or contractually through other variable interests (e.g., management and performance related fees), would give it a controlling financial interest.

The Company consolidates entities in which it, directly or indirectly, is determined to have a controlling financial interest. Consolidation conclusions are reviewed quarterly to identify whether any reconsideration events have occurred.

VIEs: The Company consolidates VIEs for which it is the primary beneficiary at the time it becomes involved with a VIE. An entity is a VIE if it has equity investors who, as a group, lack the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or it does not have sufficient equity at risk to finance its expected activities without additional subordinated financial support from other parties. The primary beneficiary (a) has the power to direct the activities of the entity that most significantly impact the entity's economic performance and (b) has the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits from the entity that could potentially be significant to the entity.

VOEs: For entities determined not to be VIEs, the Company consolidates entities in which it holds greater than 50% of the voting interest, or, for limited partnerships, when the Company owns a majority of the limited partnership's kick-out rights through voting interests.

Noncontrolling interest represents the interests of shareholders, other than the Company, in consolidated entities. In the Consolidated Statements of Operations, Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest represents such shareholders' interests in the earnings and losses of those entities, or the attribution of results from consolidated VIEs or VOEs to which the Company is not economically entitled.

Contingencies

A loss contingency is an existing condition, situation or set of circumstances involving uncertainty as to possible loss that will ultimately be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. Examples of loss contingencies include pending or threatened adverse litigation, threat of expropriation of assets and actual or possible claims and assessments. Amounts related to loss contingencies are accrued and recorded in Other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheets if it is probable that a loss has been incurred and the amount can be reasonably estimated, based on the Company's best estimate of the ultimate outcome.

Adoption of New Pronouncements

The following table provides a description of the Company's adoption of new ASUs issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the impact of the adoption on the Company's financial statements.

Standard
Description of Requirements
Effective date and method of adoption
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
ASU 2017-07, Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost
This standard, issued in March 2017, requires employers to report the service cost component of net periodic pension cost and net periodic postretirement benefit cost in the same line item as other compensation costs arising from services rendered by employees during the period. Other components of net benefit costs are required to be presented in the statement of operations separately from service costs. In addition, only service costs are eligible for capitalization in assets, when applicable.
January 1, 2018 using the retrospective method for the presentation of service costs and other components in the statement of operations, and using the prospective method for the capitalization of service costs in assets.
The adoption had no effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
ASU 2017-05, Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets
This standard, issued in February 2017, requires entities to apply certain recognition and measurement principles in ASU 2014-09, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC Topic 606)" (see Revenue from Contracts with Customers below) when they derecognize nonfinancial assets and in substance nonfinancial assets through sale or transfer, and the counterparty is not a customer.
January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method
The adoption had no effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
ASU 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments
This standard, issued in August 2016, addresses diversity in how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows. The amendments provide guidance on eight specific cash flow issues.
January 1, 2018 using the retrospective method
Adoption of the ASU did not have a material impact on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows and had no effect on the Company's financial condition or results of operations.
Standard
Description of Requirements
Effective date and method of adoption
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
ASU 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting
This standard, issued in March 2016, simplifies the accounting for share-based payment award transactions with respect to:
 • The income tax consequences of awards,
 • The impact of forfeitures on the recognition of expense for awards,
 • Classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and
 • Classification on the statement of cash flows.
January 1, 2017 using the transition method prescribed for each applicable provision
The guidance was adopted using the various transition methods as prescribed by the ASU and did not have a material impact on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
ASU 2016-01, Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities
This standard, issued in January 2016, addresses certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments, including requiring:
 • Equity investments (except those consolidated or accounted for under the equity method) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income.
 • Elimination of the disclosure of methods and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value for financial instruments measured at amortized cost.
January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method, except for certain provisions that were required to be applied using the prospective method.
The impact to the January 1, 2018 Consolidated Balance Sheet was a $28 increase, net of tax, to Unappropriated retained earnings with a corresponding decrease of $28, net of tax, to Accumulated other comprehensive income to recognize the unrealized gain associated with Equity securities. The provisions that required prospective adoption had no effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows. Under previous guidance, prior to January 1, 2018, Equity securities were classified as available for sale with changes in fair value recognized in Other comprehensive income.
ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers
This standard, issued in May 2014, requires an entity to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Revenue is recognized when, or as, the entity satisfies a performance obligation under the contract. ASU 2014-09 also updated the accounting for certain costs associated with obtaining and fulfilling contracts with customers and requires disclosures regarding the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. In addition, the FASB issued various amendments during 2016 to clarify the provisions and implementation guidance of ASU 2014-09. Revenue recognition for insurance contracts and financial instruments is explicitly scoped out of the guidance.
January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective method.
The adoption had no impact on revenue recognition. However, the adoption resulted in a $106 increase in Other assets to capitalize costs to obtain and fulfill certain financial services contracts in the Retirement segment and Corporate. This adjustment was offset by a related $22 decrease in Deferred income taxes, resulting in a net $84 increase to Retained earnings (deficit) on the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 1, 2018. In addition, disclosures have been updated to reflect accounting policy changes made as a result of the implementation of ASU 2014-09. (See the Significant Accounting Policies section.)

Comparative information has not been adjusted and continues to be reported under previous revenue recognition guidance. As of December 31, 2018, the adoption of ASU 2014-09 resulted in a $108 increase in Other assets, reduced by a related $23 decrease in Deferred income taxes, resulting in a net $85 increase to Retained earnings (deficit) on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. For the year ended December 31, 2018 , the adoption resulted in a $2 increase in Operating expenses on the Consolidated Statement of Operations and had no impact on Net cash provided by operating activities.

Future Adoption of Accounting Pronouncements

Long-Duration Contracts

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-12, "Financial Services - Insurance (Topic 944) Targeted Improvements to the Accounting for Long-Duration Contracts" ("ASU 2018-12"), which changes the measurement and disclosures of insurance liabilities and deferred acquisition costs for long-duration contracts issued by insurers. The provisions of ASU 2018-12 are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently in the process of evaluating the provisions of ASU 2018-12. While it is not possible to estimate the expected impact of adoption at this time, the Company believes there is a reasonable possibility that implementation of ASU 2018-12 may result in a significant impact on Shareholders’ equity and future earnings patterns.

In addition to requiring significantly expanded interim and annual disclosures regarding long-duration insurance contract assets and liabilities, ASU 2018-12's provisions include modifications to the accounting for such contracts in the following areas:
ASU 2018-12 Subject Area
Description of Requirements
Transition Provisions
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
Assumptions used to measure the liability for future policy benefits for nonparticipating traditional and limited payment insurance contracts


Requires insurers to review and, if necessary, update cash flow assumptions at least annually.

The effect of updating cash flow assumptions will be measured on a retrospective catch-up basis and presented in the Statement of operations in the period in which the update is made.
The rate used to discount the liability for future policy benefits will be required to be updated quarterly, with related changes in the liability recorded in Accumulated other comprehensive income. The discount rate will be based on an upper-medium grade fixed-income corporate instrument yield reflecting the duration characteristics of the relevant liabilities.

Initial adoption is required to be reported using either a full retrospective or modified retrospective approach. Under either method, upon adoption the liability for future policy benefits will be remeasured using current discount rates as of the beginning of the earliest period presented with the impact recorded as a cumulative effect adjustment to AOCI.

The application of periodic assumption updates for nonparticipating traditional and limited payment insurance contracts is significantly different from the current accounting approach for such liabilities, which is based on assumptions that are locked in at contract inception unless a premium deficiency occurs. Under the current accounting guidance, the liability discount rate is based on expected yields on the underlying investment portfolio held by the insurer.
The implications of these requirements, including transition options, and related potential financial statement impacts are currently being evaluated.
ASU 2018-12 Subject Area
Description of Requirements
Transition Provisions
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
Measurement of market risk benefits


Creates a new category of benefit features called market risk benefits, defined as features that protect contract holders from capital market risk and expose the insurers to that risk. Market risk benefits will be required to be measured at fair value, with changes in fair value recognized in the Statement of operations, except for changes in fair value attributable to changes in the instrument-specific credit risk, which will be recorded in Accumulated other comprehensive income.

Full retrospective application is required. Upon adoption, any difference between the fair value and pre-adoption carrying value of market risk benefits not currently measured at fair value will be recorded to retained earnings. In addition, the cumulative effect of changes in instrument-specific credit risk will be reclassified from retained earnings to AOCI.
Under the current accounting guidance, certain features that are expected to meet the definition of market risk benefits are accounted for as either insurance liabilities (for example, GMDB and GMIB) or embedded derivatives (for example, GMWBL and GMWB).
The implications of these requirements and related potential financial statement impacts are currently being evaluated.

Amortization of DAC and other balances


Requires DAC (and other balances that refer to the DAC model, such as deferred sales inducement costs and unearned revenue liabilities) for all long-duration contracts to be measured on a constant level basis over the expected life of the contract.

Initial adoption is required to be reported using either a full retrospective or modified retrospective approach. The method of transition applied for DAC and other balances must be consistent with the transition method selected for future policy benefit liabilities, as described above.

This approach is intended to approximate straight-line amortization and cannot be based on revenue or profits as it is under the current accounting model. Related amounts in AOCI will be eliminated upon adoption. ASU 2018-12 did not change the existing accounting guidance related to VOBA and net cost of reinsurance, which allows, but does not require, insurers to amortize such balances on a basis consistent with DAC.

The implications of these requirements, including transition options, and related potential financial statement impacts are currently being evaluated.














The following table provides a description of future adoptions of other new accounting standards that may have an impact on the Company's financial statements when adopted:
Standard
Description of Requirements

Effective date and transition provisions
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
ASU 2018-15, Implementation costs incurred in a cloud computing arrangement that is a service contract
This standard, issued in August 2018, requires a customer in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract to follow the guidance for internal-use software projects to determine which implementation costs to capitalize as an asset. Capitalized implementation costs are required to be expensed over the term of the hosting arrangement. In addition, a customer is required to apply the impairment and abandonment guidance for long-lived assets to the capitalized implementation costs. Balances related to capitalized implementation costs must be presented in the same financial statement line items as other hosting arrangement balances, and additional disclosures are required.
January 1, 2020 with early adoption permitted. Initial adoption of ASU 2018-15 may be reported either on a prospective or retrospective basis.
The Company is currently in the process of determining the impact of adoption of the provisions of ASU 2018-15.
ASU 2018-14, Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Defined Benefit Plans
This standard, issued in August 2018, eliminates certain disclosure requirements that are no longer considered cost beneficial and requires new disclosures that are considered relevant.
January 1, 2021 with early adoption permitted. Initial adoption of ASU 2018-14 is required to be reported on a retrospective basis for all periods presented.
The Company is currently in the process of determining the impact of adoption of the provisions of ASU 2018-14.
ASU 2018-13, Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement
This standard, issued in August 2018, simplifies certain disclosure requirements for fair value measurement.
January 1, 2020, including interim periods, with early adoption permitted. The transition method varies by provision.
The Company is currently in the process of determining the impact of adoption of the provisions of ASU 2018-13.
ASU 2018-02, Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
This standard, issued in February 2018, permits a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 ("Tax Reform"). Stranded tax effects arise because U.S. GAAP requires that the impact of a change in tax laws or rates on deferred tax liabilities and assets be reported in net income, even if related to items recognized within accumulated other comprehensive income. The amount of the reclassification would be based on the difference between the historical corporate income tax rate and the newly enacted 21% corporate income tax rate, applied to deferred tax liabilities and assets reported within accumulated other comprehensive income.
January 1, 2019 with early adoption permitted. Initial adoption of ASU 2018-02 may be reported either in the period of adoption or on a retrospective basis in each period in which the effect of the change in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate resulting from Tax Reform is recognized.
The Company intends to adopt ASU 2018-02 as of January 1, 2019. Adoption is expected to result in an increase to Accumulated other comprehensive income of approximately $343, with a corresponding decrease in Retained earnings.

Standard
Description of Requirements

Effective date and transition provisions
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
ASU 2017-12, Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities
This standard, issued in August 2017, enables entities to better portray risk management activities in their financial statements, as follows:
• Expands an entity's ability to hedge nonfinancial and financial risk components and reduces complexity in accounting for fair value hedges of interest rate risk,
• Eliminates the requirement to separately measure and report hedge ineffectiveness and generally requires the entire change in the fair value of a hedging instrument to be presented in the same income statement line as the hedged item,
• Eases certain documentation and assessment requirements and modifies the accounting for components excluded from the assessment of hedge effectiveness, and modifies required disclosures.
In October 2018, the FASB issued an amendment which expands the list of U.S. benchmark interest rates permitted in the application of hedge accounting.
January 1, 2019, including interim periods, with early adoption permitted. Initial adoption of ASU 2017-12 is required to be reported using a modified retrospective approach, with the exception of the presentation and disclosure requirements which are required to be applied prospectively.
The Company does not expect ASU 2017-12 to have material impact on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
ASU 2017-08, Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities
This standard, issued in March 2017, shortens the amortization period for certain callable debt securities held at a premium by requiring the premium to be amortized to the earliest call date.
January 1, 2019, including interim periods, with early adoption permitted. Initial adoption of ASU 2017-08 is required to be reported using a modified retrospective approach.
The Company does not expect ASU 2017-08 to have material impact on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.
ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments
This standard, issued in June 2016:
• Introduces a new current expected credit loss ("CECL") model to measure impairment on certain types of financial instruments,
• Requires an entity to estimate lifetime expected credit losses, under the new CECL model, based on relevant information about historical events, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts,
• Modifies the impairment model for available-for-sale debt securities, and
• Provides a simplified accounting model for purchased financial assets with credit deterioration since their origination.
January 1, 2020, including interim periods, with early adoption permitted. Initial adoption of ASU 2016-13 is required to be reported on a modified retrospective basis, with a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the year of adoption, except for certain provisions that are required to be applied prospectively.
The Company is currently in the process of determining the impact of adoption of the provisions of ASU 2016-13.

Standard
Description of Requirements

Effective date and transition provisions
Effect on the financial statements or other significant matters
ASU 2016-02, Leases
This standard, issued in February 2016, requires lessees to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with terms of more than 12 months. The lease liability will be measured as the present value of the lease payments, and the asset will be based on the liability. For income statement purposes, expense recognition will depend on the lessee's classification of the lease as either finance, with a front-loaded amortization expense pattern similar to current capital leases, or operating, with a straight-line expense pattern similar to current operating leases. Lessor accounting will be similar to the current model, and lessors will be required to classify leases as operating, direct financing, or sales-type.

ASU 2016-02 also replaces the sale-leaseback guidance to align with the new revenue recognition standard, addresses statement of operation and statement of cash flow classification, and requires additional disclosures for all leases. In addition, the FASB issued various amendments during 2018 to clarify and simplify the provisions and implementation guidance of ASU 2016-02.
January 1, 2019, including interim periods, on a modified retrospective basis and with early adoption permitted.

In July 2018, the FASB issued an amendment that adds an optional
transition method to apply the guidance on a modified retrospective basis at the adoption date, which is January 1, 2019.

The Company is currently in the process of determining the impact of adoption of the provisions of ASU 2016-02. Upon adoption, the Company expects to apply the optional transition method and record a right-of-use asset and lease liability on the Consolidated Balance Sheet related to existing operating leases. The Company currently estimates that the amount of the right-of-use asset and lease liability recorded upon adoption will be less than $150. Any new lease arrangements and/or significant modifications entered into subsequent to the adoption date will be accounted for in accordance with the new standard.
v3.10.0.1
Discontinued Operations
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Discontinued Operations and Disposal Groups [Abstract]  
Discontinued Operations Discontinued Operations

As noted in the Business, Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies Note, on June 1, 2018, the Company closed the transaction with VA Capital and Athene (the "Buyers") pursuant to which Venerable acquired two of the Company’s subsidiaries, VIAC and DSL. The transaction resulted in the disposition of substantially all of the Company’s CBVA and Annuities businesses.

The purchase price for VIAC was equal to the difference between the Required Adjusted Book Value (as defined in the MTA) and the Statutory capital in VIAC at closing, after giving effect to certain restructuring and other pre-sale transactions, including the reinsurance of the fixed and fixed indexed annuity business of VIAC to affiliates in Athene. Following the closing of the Transaction, the Company, through its other insurance subsidiaries, continues to own surplus notes issued by VIAC in an aggregate principal amount of $350 and acquired a 9.99% equity interest in VA Capital. The investment in surplus notes is reported in Fixed maturities, available-for-sale on the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December, 31, 2018. In the summary of major categories of assets and liabilities related to discontinued operations as of December 31, 2017 presented below, VIAC's corresponding liability for the surplus notes is included in Notes payable.

Pursuant to the terms of the MTA and prior to the closing of the Transaction, VIAC undertook certain restructuring transactions, including reinsurance, with several affiliates in order to transfer business and assets into and out of VIAC from and to the Company's affiliates. See the Reinsurance Note to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

In connection with the closing, Voya Investment Management Co., LLC ("Voya IM") or its affiliated advisors, entered into one or more agreements to perform asset management and ancillary services for Venerable as part of the transaction. As part of the agreements, Voya IM will serve as the preferred asset management partner for Venerable. Under the agreements, subject to certain criteria, Voya IM will manage and service certain assets, including, for at least five years following the closing of the transaction, certain general account assets. The Company and Voya IM also agreed to provide certain transitional services to Venerable following the closing of the Transaction. The length of each service varies depending on the type of service provided.

The Company has determined that the CBVA and Annuities businesses disposed of in the Transaction meet the criteria to be classified as discontinued operations and that the sale represents a strategic shift that has a major effect on the Company’s operations.  Accordingly, the results of operations of the businesses sold have been presented as discontinued operations in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations and Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for all periods presented, and the assets and liabilities of the businesses sold were classified as held for sale in the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31,2017.

The results of discontinued operations are reported in "Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax" in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations for all periods presented. As of December 31, 2017, the Company recorded an estimated loss on sale, net of tax of $2,423 which included estimated transaction costs of $31 as well as the loss of $692 of deferred tax assets to write down the assets of the business sold to fair value less the cost to sell as of December 31, 2017. Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax, for the year ended December 31, 2018 includes a favorable adjustment to the estimated loss on sale of $505, net of tax.The loss on sale, net of tax, as of December 31, 2018 of $1,918, which includes the loss of $460 of deferred tax assets, represents the excess of the estimated carrying value, immediately prior to the sale of the businesses classified as discontinued operations over the purchase price, which approximates fair value, less cost to sell. Additionally, in connection with the Transaction, the Company reversed $79 of other comprehensive income, net of tax that was previously recorded and related to the Annuity and CBVA businesses sold.

As required by the MTA, VA Capital provided the Company with its proposed purchase price adjustments in December 2018. By way of a dispute notice provided to VA Capital in January 2019, the Company has formally objected to each of these proposed adjustments. The MTA requires the parties to attempt to resolve these differences in an informal manner prior to entering a formal arbitration phase. Whether or not arbitration is required, the Company expects this matter to be resolved during the first or second quarter of 2019. Applicable accounting principles require the Company to estimate and disclose any reasonably possible loss associated with VA Capital’s purchase price adjustment claims, even in a circumstance where the Company believes that it will prevail on the merits. Solely for this purpose, the Company estimates that this reasonably possible loss is in a range between $0 and $100.


The following table summarizes the major categories of assets and liabilities disposed of in the Transaction and classified as held for sale in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31, 2017:
 
December 31, 2017
Assets:
 
Total investments
$
29,809

Cash and cash equivalents
498

Short-term investments under securities loan agreements, including collateral delivered
473

Deferred policy acquisition costs, Value of business acquired and Sales inducements
1,001

Deferred income taxes
404

Other assets(1)
396

Assets held in separate accounts
28,894

Write-down of businesses held for sale to fair value less cost to sell
(2,423
)
Total assets held for sale
$
59,052

 
 
Liabilities:
 
Future policy benefits and contract owner account balances
$
27,065

Payables under securities loan and repurchase agreements, including collateral held
1,152

Derivatives
782

Notes payable
350

Other liabilities
34

Liabilities related to separate accounts
28,894

Total liabilities held for sale
$
58,277

(1) Includes Other assets, Accrued investment income, Premium receivable and reinsurance recoverable.
 





















The following table summarizes the components of Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2018 (1)

 
2017
 
2016
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment income
$
510

 
$
1,266

 
$
1,288

Fee income
295

 
801

 
889

Premiums
(50
)
 
190

 
720

Total net realized capital losses
(345
)
 
(1,234
)
 
(900
)
Other revenue
10

 
19

 
19

Total revenues
420

 
1,042

 
2,016

Benefits and expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Interest credited and other benefits to contract owners/policyholders
442

 
978

 
2,199

Operating expenses
(14
)
 
250

 
283

Net amortization of Deferred policy acquisition costs and Value of business acquired
49

 
127

 
136

Interest expense
10

 
22

 
22

Total benefits and expenses
487

 
1,377

 
2,640

Income (loss) from discontinued operations before income taxes
(67
)
 
(335
)
 
(624
)
Income tax expense (benefit)
(19
)
 
(178
)
 
(287
)
Loss on sale, net of tax
505

 
(2,423
)
 

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax
$
457

 
$
(2,580
)
 
$
(337
)
(1) Reflects Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax for the five months ended May 31, 2018 (the Transaction closed on June 1, 2018).
v3.10.0.1
Investments (excluding Consolidated Investment Entities)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Investments, Debt and Equity Securities [Abstract]  
Investments (excluding Consolidated Investment Entities) Investments (excluding Consolidated Investment Entities)

Fixed Maturities and Equity Securities

Available-for-sale and FVO fixed maturities were as follows as of December 31, 2018:
 
Amortized Cost
 
Gross Unrealized Capital Gains
 
Gross Unrealized Capital Losses
 
Embedded Derivatives(2)
 
Fair Value
 
OTTI(3)(4)
Fixed maturities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. Treasuries
$
1,937

 
$
360

 
$
2

 
$

 
$
2,295

 
$

U.S. Government agencies and authorities
204

 
38

 

 

 
242

 

State, municipalities and political subdivisions
1,652

 
29

 
22

 

 
1,659

 

U.S. corporate public securities
19,210

 
1,053

 
415

 

 
19,848

 

U.S. corporate private securities
6,264

 
138

 
170

 

 
6,232

 

Foreign corporate public securities and foreign governments(1)
5,429

 
193

 
167

 

 
5,455

 

Foreign corporate private securities(1)
5,176

 
70

 
152

 

 
5,094

 

Residential mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agency
2,916

 
138

 
34

 
14

 
3,034

 

Non-Agency
1,700

 
76

 
19

 
12

 
1,769

 
11

Total Residential mortgage-backed securities
4,616

 
214

 
53

 
26

 
4,803

 
11

Commercial mortgage-backed securities
3,438

 
33

 
55

 

 
3,416

 

Other asset-backed securities
2,095

 
30

 
48

 

 
2,077

 
2

Total fixed maturities, including securities pledged
50,021

 
2,158

 
1,084

 
26

 
51,121

 
13

Less: Securities pledged
1,824

 
107

 
64

 

 
1,867

 

Total fixed maturities
$
48,197

 
$
2,051

 
$
1,020

 
$
26

 
$
49,254

 
$
13

(1) Primarily U.S. dollar denominated.
(2) Embedded derivatives within fixed maturity securities are reported with the host investment. The changes in fair value of embedded derivatives are reported in Other net realized capital gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
(3) Represents OTTI reported as a component of Other comprehensive income (loss).
(4) Amount excludes $300 of net unrealized gains on impaired available-for-sale securities.

Available-for-sale and FVO fixed maturities and equity securities were as follows as of December 31, 2017:
 
Amortized Cost
 
Gross Unrealized Capital Gains
 
Gross Unrealized Capital Losses
 
Embedded Derivatives(2)
 
Fair Value
 
OTTI(3)(4)
Fixed maturities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. Treasuries
$
2,047

 
$
477

 
$
2

 
$

 
$
2,522

 
$

U.S. Government agencies and authorities
223

 
52

 

 

 
275

 

State, municipalities and political subdivisions
1,856

 
68

 
11

 

 
1,913

 

U.S. corporate public securities
20,857

 
2,451

 
50

 

 
23,258

 

U.S. corporate private securities
5,628

 
255

 
50

 

 
5,833

 

Foreign corporate public securities and foreign governments(1)
5,241

 
493

 
18

 

 
5,716

 

Foreign corporate private securities(1)
4,974

 
251

 
64

 

 
5,161

 
10

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Residential mortgage-backed securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agency
2,990

 
164

 
30

 
21

 
3,145

 

Non-Agency
1,257

 
110

 
4

 
16

 
1,379

 
16

Total Residential mortgage-backed securities
4,247

 
274

 
34

 
37

 
4,524

 
16

Commercial mortgage-backed securities
2,646

 
69

 
11

 

 
2,704

 

Other asset-backed securities
1,488

 
43

 
3

 

 
1,528

 
3