LIBBEY INC, 10-Q filed on 8/2/2017
Quarterly Report
Document and Entity Information
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Jul. 27, 2017
Entity Information [Line Items]
 
 
Entity Registrant Name
LIBBEY INC 
 
Entity Central Index Key
0000902274 
 
Current Fiscal Year End Date
--12-31 
 
Entity Filer Category
Accelerated Filer 
 
Document Type
10-Q 
 
Document Period End Date
Jun. 30, 2017 
 
Document Fiscal Year Focus
2017 
 
Document Fiscal Period Focus
Q2 
 
Amendment Flag
false 
 
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding
 
22,014,591 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations (USD $)
In Thousands, except Per Share data, unless otherwise specified
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2016
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2016
Net sales
$ 197,514 
$ 207,902 
$ 370,508 
$ 390,709 
Freight billed to customers
747 
662 
1,423 
1,280 
Total revenues
198,261 
208,564 
371,931 
391,989 
Cost of sales
157,483 
158,153 
300,839 
301,604 
Gross profit
40,778 
50,411 
71,092 
90,385 
Selling, general and administrative expenses
33,676 
30,673 
66,651 
64,808 
Income from operations
7,102 
19,738 
4,441 
25,577 
Other income (expense)
(644)
802 
(2,904)
787 
Earnings before interest and income taxes
6,458 
20,540 
1,537 
26,364 
Interest expense
5,138 
5,154 
10,005 
10,398 
Income before income taxes
1,320 
15,386 
(8,468)
15,966 
Provision for income taxes
2,152 
6,691 
(1,066)
6,553 
Net income (loss)
$ (832)
$ 8,695 
$ (7,402)
$ 9,413 
Net income (loss) per share:
 
 
 
 
Basic
$ (0.04)
$ 0.40 
$ (0.34)
$ 0.43 
Diluted
$ (0.04)
$ 0.40 
$ (0.34)
$ 0.43 
Dividends declared per share
$ 0.1175 
$ 0.115 
$ 0.235 
$ 0.23 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (USD $)
In Thousands, unless otherwise specified
3 Months Ended 6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2016
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2016
Net income (loss)
$ (832)
$ 8,695 
$ (7,402)
$ 9,413 
Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
Pension and other postretirement benefit adjustments, net of tax
2,994 
3,038 
3,450 
4,027 
Change in fair value of derivative instruments, net of tax
(563)
157 
(398)
(1,701)
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax
5,589 
(2,879)
6,997 
326 
Other comprehensive income, net of tax
8,020 
316 
10,049 
2,652 
Comprehensive income
$ 7,188 
$ 9,011 
$ 2,647 
$ 12,065 
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets (USD $)
In Thousands, unless otherwise specified
Jun. 30, 2017
Dec. 31, 2016
Assets:
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$ 28,167 
$ 61,011 
Accounts receivable - net
88,969 
85,113 
Inventories - net
180,066 
170,009 
Prepaid and other current assets
15,350 
16,777 
Total current assets
312,552 
332,910 
Purchased intangible assets - net
14,945 
15,225 
Goodwill
164,112 
164,112 
Deferred income taxes
39,226 
40,016 
Other assets
10,611 
9,514 
Property, plant and equipment - net
263,575 
256,392 
Total assets
805,021 
818,169 
Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity:
 
 
Accounts payable
66,636 
71,582 
Salaries and wages
24,185 
27,018 
Accrued liabilities
50,148 
41,807 
Accrued income taxes
1,725 
1,384 
Pension liability (current portion)
2,373 
2,461 
Non-pension postretirement benefits (current portion)
4,897 
4,892 
Derivative liability
1,178 
1,928 
Long-term debt due within one year
6,174 
5,009 
Total current liabilities
157,316 
156,081 
Long-term debt
390,207 
402,831 
Pension liability
45,729 
43,934 
Non-pension postretirement benefits
50,429 
55,373 
Deferred income taxes
2,030 
1,859 
Other long-term liabilities
12,508 
12,972 
Total liabilities
658,219 
673,050 
Contingencies (Note 13)
   
   
Shareholders' equity:
 
 
Common stock, par value $.01 per share, 50,000,000 shares authorized, 22,010,506 shares issued in 2017 (21,864,541 shares issued in 2016)
220 
219 
Capital in excess of par value
331,743 
329,722 
Retained deficit
(70,013)
(59,625)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(115,148)
(125,197)
Total shareholders' equity
146,802 
145,119 
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
$ 805,021 
$ 818,169 
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets Parenthetical (USD $)
Jun. 30, 2017
Dec. 31, 2016
Common stock, par value
$ 0.01 
$ 0.01 
Common stock, shares authorized
50,000,000 
50,000,000 
Common stock, shares issued
22,010,506 
21,864,541 
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Shareholders' Equity Statement (USD $)
In Thousands, except Share data, unless otherwise specified
Total
Common Stock
Capital in Excess of Par Value
Retained Deficit
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Balance, value at Dec. 31, 2016
$ 145,119 
$ 219 
$ 329,722 
$ (59,625)
$ (125,197)
Balance, shares at Dec. 31, 2016
 
21,864,541 
 
 
 
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity [Roll Forward]
 
 
 
 
 
Cumulative-effect adjustment for the adoption of ASU 2016-09
2,310 
 
127 
2,183 
 
Net loss
(7,402)
 
 
(7,402)
 
Other comprehensive income
10,049 
 
 
 
10,049 
Stock compensation expense
2,090 
 
2,090 
 
 
Dividends
(5,169)
 
 
(5,169)
 
Stock withheld for employee taxes
(601)
 
(601)
 
 
Stock issued, value
406 
405 
 
 
Stock issued, shares
 
145,965 
 
 
 
Balance, value at Jun. 30, 2017
$ 146,802 
$ 220 
$ 331,743 
$ (70,013)
$ (115,148)
Balance, shares at Jun. 30, 2017
 
22,010,506 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (USD $)
In Thousands, unless otherwise specified
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Jun. 30, 2016
Operating activities:
 
 
Net income (loss)
$ (7,402)
$ 9,413 
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
22,383 
25,435 
Loss on asset sales and disposals
54 
119 
Change in accounts receivable
(2,538)
1,389 
Change in inventories
(7,182)
(11,303)
Change in accounts payable
(6,344)
(6,688)
Accrued interest and amortization of discounts and finance fees
713 
(1,890)
Pension & non-pension postretirement benefits, net
2,982 
(1,766)
Accrued liabilities & prepaid expenses
9,442 
14,687 
Income taxes
(3,619)
1,415 
Share-based compensation expense
2,148 
3,323 
Other operating activities
(728)
(1,779)
Net cash provided by operating activities
9,909 
32,355 
Investing activities:
 
 
Additions to property, plant and equipment
(27,048)
(15,511)
Net cash used in investing activities
(27,048)
(15,511)
Financing activities:
 
 
Borrowings on ABL credit facility
3,277 
6,000 
Repayments on ABL credit facility
(3,277)
(6,000)
Other repayments
(169)
(350)
Repayments on Term Loan B
(12,200)
(12,200)
Stock options exercised
466 
1,050 
Taxes paid on distribution of equity awards
(601)
(764)
Dividends
(5,169)
(5,032)
Treasury shares purchased
(2,000)
Other financing activities
888 
Net cash used in financing activities
(16,785)
(19,296)
Effect of exchange rate fluctuations on cash
1,080 
(146)
Decrease in cash
(32,844)
(2,598)
Cash & cash equivalents at beginning of period
61,011 
49,044 
Cash & cash equivalents at end of period
28,167 
46,446 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
 
 
Cash paid during the period for interest
9,155 
12,160 
Cash paid during the period for income taxes
$ 2,011 
$ 4,469 
Description of the Business
Description of the Business
Description of the Business

Libbey is a leading global manufacturer and marketer of glass tableware products. We produce glass tableware in five countries and sell to customers in over 100 countries. We design and market, under our Libbey®, Libbey Signature®, Masters Reserve®, Crisa®, Royal Leerdam®, World® Tableware, Syracuse® China and Crisal Glass® brand names (among others), an extensive line of high-quality glass tableware, ceramic dinnerware, metal flatware, hollowware and serveware items for sale primarily in the foodservice, retail and business-to-business markets. Our sales force presents our tabletop products to the global marketplace in a coordinated fashion. We own and operate two glass tableware manufacturing plants in the United States as well as glass tableware manufacturing plants in Mexico (Libbey Mexico), the Netherlands (Libbey Holland), Portugal (Libbey Portugal) and China (Libbey China). In addition, we import tabletop products from overseas in order to complement our line of manufactured items. The combination of manufacturing and procurement allows us to compete in the global tabletop market by offering an extensive product line at competitive prices.

Our website can be found at www.libbey.com. We make available, free of charge, at this website all of our reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including our annual report on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K, as well as amendments to those reports. These reports are made available on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after their filing with, or furnishing to, the Securities and Exchange Commission and can also be found at www.sec.gov.

Our shares are traded on the NYSE American exchange under the ticker symbol LBY.
Significant Accounting Policies
Significant Accounting Policies
Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of Libbey Inc. and its majority-owned subsidiaries (collectively, Libbey or the Company) have been prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (U.S. GAAP) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Item 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (including normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three month and six month periods ended June 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2017.

The balance sheet at December 31, 2016 has been derived from the audited financial statements at that date but does not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. The financial information included herein should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

Stock-based compensation expense charged to the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations is as follows:
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Stock-based compensation expense
 
$
1,316

 
$
1,507

 
$
2,148

 
$
3,323



Reclassifications

Certain amounts in prior years' financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the presentation used in the three month and six month periods ended June 30, 2017, including the following:
On the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, certain activity was reclassified between operating and financing activities pursuant to adoption of Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-09, "Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting," effective January 1, 2017.
In note 10 Segments, net sales and related costs for certain countries were reclassified between segments to align with changes in business unit responsibilities effective January 1, 2017.
In note 10 Segments, the derivative amount included in the Reconciliation of Segment EBIT to Net Income in the prior year financial statements has been included in Segment EBIT to conform to the current year presentation.

New Accounting Standards    

Each change to U.S. GAAP is established by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) in the form of an accounting standards update (ASU) to the FASB’s Accounting Standards Codification (ASC). We consider the applicability and impact of all ASUs. ASUs not listed below were assessed and determined to be either not applicable or are expected to have minimal impact on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, "Revenue From Contracts With Customers", as amended by ASU's 2015-14, 2016-08, 2016-10, 2016-11, 2016-12, 2016-20 and 2017-05, which outlines a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most current revenue recognition guidance, including industry-specific guidance. ASU 2014-09 is based on the principle that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASU 2014-09 also requires disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and changes in judgments and assets recognized from costs incurred to fulfill a contract. Entities have the option of using either a full retrospective or a modified retrospective approach for the adoption of the new standard. This update is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. We plan to adopt this standard in the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective method, whereby the cumulative effect of applying the standard is recognized at the date of initial application. We have substantially completed our evaluation of significant contracts and the review of our current accounting policies and practices to identify potential differences that would result from applying the requirements of ASU 2014-09 to our revenue contracts. In addition, we have identified, and are in the process of implementing, appropriate changes to business processes, systems and controls to support recognition and disclosure under the new standard. We do not expect the adoption of ASU 2014-09 to have a material impact on the amount and timing of revenue recognized in our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, "Leases (Topic 842)," which requires a lessee to recognize on the balance sheet, assets and liabilities for leases with lease terms of more than 12 months. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating leases, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. The new guidance also clarifies the definition of a lease and disclosure requirements. ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, with early application permitted. Lessees and lessors must apply a modified retrospective transition approach for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements. The modified retrospective approach does not require any transition accounting for leases that expired before the earliest comparative period presented. We are currently evaluating the impact of this standard and anticipate the new guidance will significantly impact our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as we have a significant number of leases. See note 16, Operating Leases, in our 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 for our minimum lease commitments under non-cancellable operating leases.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, "Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting." Areas for simplification in this update involve several aspects of accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-09 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. We adopted the new guidance on January 1, 2017, requiring us to recognize all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies related to stock compensation as income tax expense or benefit in the income statement. Excess tax benefits will be recognized regardless of whether the benefit reduces taxes payable in the current period, subject to normal valuation allowance considerations. Previous guidance resulted in credits to equity for such tax benefits and delayed recognition until the tax benefits reduced income taxes payable. This provision in the standard was applied using a modified retrospective transition method by means of a cumulative-effect adjustment to equity as of the beginning of the year of adoption. As of January 1, 2017, we recorded a $2.3 million reduction to our retained deficit and an increase in deferred income tax assets. In addition, on the modified retrospective basis, we have elected to discontinue estimating forfeitures expected to occur when determining the amount of compensation expense to be recognized in each period, resulting in an immaterial impact to our retained deficit and capital in excess of par. We do not anticipate this change will have a material impact on our future results of operations. The presentation requirements for cash flows under the new standard were adopted on a retrospective basis, resulting in a reclassification on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows that increased cash provided by operating activities and increased cash used in financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2016.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, "Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments." This standard introduces a new approach to estimating credit losses on certain types of financial instruments, including trade receivables, and modifies the impairment model for available-for-sale debt securities. ASU 2016-13 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early application permitted. We are currently assessing the impact that this standard will have on our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, "Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory." ASU 2016-16 clarifies that an entity should recognize the income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory when the transfer occurs. ASU 2016-16 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. We are currently assessing the impact that this standard will have on our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, "Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment." ASU 2017-04 simplifies the goodwill impairment testing by eliminating Step 2 from the goodwill impairment testing required, should an impairment be discovered during its annual or interim assessment. ASU 2017-04 is effective for annual or interim impairment tests beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted. We plan to early adopt this standard on a prospective basis for our annual, and any interim, goodwill impairment testing performed after January 1, 2017, and this is considered a change in accounting principle. We are early adopting this standard as it will decrease the cost and complexity in applying current GAAP without significantly changing the usefulness of the information provided to users of our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

In March 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-07, "Compensation - Retirement Benefits (Topic 715): Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost." ASU 2017-07 requires that only the service cost component of pension and postretirement benefit costs be reported within income from operations. The other components of net benefit cost are required to be presented in the income statement outside of income from operations, if presented. In addition, this ASU allows only the service cost component to be eligible for capitalization when applicable. ASU 2017-07 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. Presentation on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations will be retrospective and any impact to capitalized costs will be prospectively adopted. We plan to adopt this standard in the first quarter of 2018 and expect the impact to be reclassifications of applicable costs and credits from income from operations to other income (expense).
Balance Sheet Details
Balance Sheet Details
Balance Sheet Details

The following table provides detail of selected balance sheet items:
(dollars in thousands)
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Accounts receivable:
 
 
 
Trade receivables
$
87,330

 
$
82,851

Other receivables
1,639

 
2,262

Total accounts receivable, less allowances of $8,561 and $7,832
$
88,969

 
$
85,113

 
 
 
 
Inventories:
 
 
 
Finished goods
$
162,084

 
$
152,261

Work in process
1,791

 
1,625

Raw materials
4,198

 
4,432

Repair parts
10,721

 
10,558

Operating supplies
1,272

 
1,133

Total inventories, less loss provisions of $10,417 and $9,484
$
180,066

 
$
170,009

 
 
 
 
Accrued liabilities:
 
 
 
Accrued incentives
$
25,398

 
$
19,771

Other accrued liabilities
24,750

 
22,036

Total accrued liabilities
$
50,148

 
$
41,807

Borrowings
Borrowings
Borrowings

Borrowings consist of the following:
(dollars in thousands)
Interest Rate
 
Maturity Date
June 30,
2017
 
December 31,
2016
Borrowings under ABL Facility
floating
 
April 9, 2019
$

 
$

Term Loan B
floating
(1) 
April 9, 2021
396,800

 
409,000

AICEP Loan
0.00%
 
July 30, 2018
3,421

 
3,320

Total borrowings
 
 
 
400,221

 
412,320

Less — unamortized discount and finance fees
 
3,840

 
4,480

Total borrowings — net
 
 
 
396,381

 
407,840

Less — long term debt due within one year
 
 
6,174

 
5,009

Total long-term portion of borrowings — net
 
$
390,207

 
$
402,831


________________________
(1)
We have entered into an interest rate swap which effectively fixes a series of our future interest payments on a portion of the Term Loan B debt. See interest rate swap in note 8 for additional details. The Term Loan B floating interest rate was 4.10 percent at June 30, 2017.

At June 30, 2017, the available borrowing base under the ABL Facility was offset by a $0.5 million rent reserve and a $0.2 million natural gas derivative liability. The ABL Facility also provides for the issuance of up to $30.0 million of letters of credit which, when outstanding, are applied against the $100.0 million limit. At June 30, 2017, $7.0 million in letters of credit were outstanding. Remaining unused availability under the ABL Facility was $90.3 million at June 30, 2017, compared to $88.4 million at December 31, 2016.
Income Taxes
Income Taxes
Income Taxes

For interim tax reporting, we estimate our annual effective tax rate and apply it to our year-to-date ordinary income. Tax jurisdictions with a projected or year-to-date loss for which a tax benefit cannot be realized are excluded from the annualized effective tax rate. The tax effects of unusual or infrequently occurring items, including changes in judgment about valuation allowances and effects of changes in tax laws or rates, are reported in the interim period in which they occur.

Our effective tax rate was 12.6 percent for the six months ended June 30, 2017, compared to 41.0 percent for the six months ended June 30, 2016. Our effective tax rate for the six months ended June 30, 2017, which was below the United States statutory rate, was affected by the timing and mix of pretax income earned in jurisdictions with rates lower than the United States statutory rate of (67.7) percent, the impact of foreign exchange of 28.0 percent, and other items including foreign withholding tax and nondeductible expenses of 17.3 percent. Our effective tax rate for the six months ended June 30, 2016, which was above the United States statutory rate, was affected the timing and mix of pretax income earned in jurisdictions with rates lower than the United States statutory rate of 2.3 percent, the impact of foreign exchange of (9.1) percent, and other items including foreign withholding tax and nondeductible expenses of 12.8 percent.

The Company and its subsidiaries are subject to examination by various countries' tax authorities. These examinations may lead to proposed or assessed adjustments to our taxes. In August 2016, one of our Mexican subsidiaries received a tax assessment from the Mexican tax authority (SAT) related to the audit of its 2010 tax year. The amount assessed was approximately 3 billion Mexican Pesos, which was equivalent to approximately $157 million US dollars as of the date of the assessment. The Company has filed an administrative appeal with SAT requesting that the assessment be fully nullified. We are awaiting the outcome of the appeal. Management, in consultation with external legal counsel, believes that if contested in the Mexican court system, it is more likely than not that the Company would prevail on all significant components of the assessment. Management intends to continue to vigorously contest all significant components of the assessment in the Mexican courts if they are not nullified at the administrative appeal level. We believe that our tax reserves related to uncertain tax positions are adequate at this time. There were no significant developments affecting this matter for the six months ended June 30, 2017.

See note 2 for details regarding the tax effects of adopting ASU 2016-09, "Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting," effective January 1, 2017.
Pension and Non-pension Postretirement Benefits
Pension and Non-pension Postretirement Benefits
Pension and Non-pension Postretirement Benefits

We have pension plans covering the majority of our employees. Benefits generally are based on compensation and service for salaried employees and job grade and length of service for hourly employees. In addition, we have an unfunded supplemental employee retirement plan (SERP) that covers certain salaried U.S.-based employees of Libbey hired before January 1, 2006. The U.S. pension plans cover the salaried U.S.-based employees of Libbey hired before January 1, 2006 and most hourly U.S.-based employees (excluding employees hired at Shreveport after December 15, 2008 and at Toledo after September 30, 2010). Effective January 1, 2013, we ceased annual company contribution credits to the cash balance accounts in our Libbey U.S. Salaried Pension Plan and SERP. The non-U.S. pension plans cover the employees of our wholly owned subsidiary in Mexico and are unfunded.

The components of our net pension expense, including the SERP, are as follows:
Three months ended June 30,
U.S. Plans
 
Non-U.S. Plans
 
Total
(dollars in thousands)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Service cost
$
883

 
$
863

 
$
277

 
$
318

 
$
1,160

 
$
1,181

Interest cost
3,442

 
3,705

 
701

 
670

 
4,143

 
4,375

Expected return on plan assets
(5,623
)
 
(5,760
)
 

 

 
(5,623
)
 
(5,760
)
Amortization of unrecognized:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prior service cost (credit)
59

 
66

 
(52
)
 
(53
)
 
7

 
13

Actuarial loss
1,265

 
1,016

 
152

 
203

 
1,417

 
1,219

Settlement charge

 
42

 

 
170

 

 
212

Pension expense
$
26

 
$
(68
)
 
$
1,078

 
$
1,308

 
$
1,104

 
$
1,240

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six months ended June 30,
U.S. Plans
 
Non-U.S. Plans
 
Total
(dollars in thousands)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Service cost
$
1,958

 
$
1,859

 
$
528

 
$
635

 
$
2,486

 
$
2,494

Interest cost
6,892

 
7,482

 
1,338

 
1,342

 
8,230

 
8,824

Expected return on plan assets
(11,240
)
 
(11,515
)
 

 

 
(11,240
)
 
(11,515
)
Amortization of unrecognized:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prior service cost (credit)
118

 
132

 
(99
)
 
(107
)
 
19

 
25

Actuarial loss
2,617

 
2,136

 
290

 
405

 
2,907

 
2,541

Settlement charge

 
42

 

 
170

 

 
212

Pension expense
$
345

 
$
136

 
$
2,057

 
$
2,445

 
$
2,402

 
$
2,581

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


We have contributed $0.6 million and $1.9 million of cash into our pension plans for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively. Pension contributions for the remainder of 2017 are estimated to be $0.6 million.

We provide certain retiree health care and life insurance benefits covering our U.S. and Canadian salaried employees hired before January 1, 2004 and a majority of our union hourly employees (excluding employees hired at Shreveport after December 15, 2008 and at Toledo after September 30, 2010). Employees are generally eligible for benefits upon retirement and completion of a specified number of years of creditable service. Benefits for most hourly retirees are determined by collective bargaining. The U.S. non-pension postretirement plans cover the hourly and salaried U.S.-based employees of Libbey (excluding those mentioned above). The non-U.S. non-pension postretirement plans cover the retirees and active employees of Libbey who are located in Canada. The postretirement benefit plans are unfunded.

The provision for our non-pension postretirement benefit expense consists of the following:
Three months ended June 30,
U.S. Plans
 
Non-U.S. Plans
 
Total
(dollars in thousands)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Service cost
$
96

 
$
199

 
$

 
$
1

 
$
96

 
$
200

Interest cost
471

 
652

 
11

 
12

 
482

 
664

Amortization of unrecognized:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prior service cost (credit)
(51
)
 
35

 

 

 
(51
)
 
35

Actuarial loss / (gain)
(154
)
 
20

 
(13
)
 
(11
)
 
(167
)
 
9

Non-pension postretirement benefit expense
$
362

 
$
906

 
$
(2
)
 
$
2

 
$
360

 
$
908

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six months ended June 30,
U.S. Plans
 
Non-U.S. Plans
 
Total
(dollars in thousands)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Service cost
$
316

 
$
398

 
$

 
$
1

 
$
316

 
$
399

Interest cost
1,052

 
1,304

 
22

 
24

 
1,074

 
1,328

Amortization of unrecognized:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prior service cost (credit)
(101
)
 
70

 

 

 
(101
)
 
70

Actuarial loss / (gain)
(129
)
 
40

 
(26
)
 
(22
)
 
(155
)
 
18

Non-pension postretirement benefit expense
$
1,138

 
$
1,812

 
$
(4
)
 
$
3

 
$
1,134

 
$
1,815

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Our 2017 estimate of non-pension cash payments is $5.0 million, and we have paid $1.0 million and $1.6 million for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively.
Net Income (Loss) per Share of Common Stock
Net Income (Loss) per Share of Common Stock
Net Income (Loss) per Share of Common Stock

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings (loss) per share:
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands, except earnings per share)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Numerator for earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) that is available to common shareholders
$
(832
)
 
$
8,695

 
$
(7,402
)
 
$
9,413

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Denominator for basic earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average shares outstanding
22,029,519

 
21,865,315

 
21,984,365

 
21,857,743

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Denominator for diluted earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Effect of stock options and restricted stock units

 
138,071

 

 
143,860

Adjusted weighted average shares and assumed conversions
22,029,519

 
22,003,386

 
21,984,365

 
22,001,603

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings (loss) per share
$
(0.04
)
 
$
0.40

 
$
(0.34
)
 
$
0.43

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted earnings (loss) per share
$
(0.04
)
 
$
0.40

 
$
(0.34
)
 
$
0.43

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shares excluded from diluted earnings (loss) per share due to:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net loss position (excluded from denominator)
60,141

 

 
111,791

 

Inclusion would have been anti-dilutive (excluded from calculation)
924,652

 
641,964

 
744,317

 
628,134



When applicable, diluted shares outstanding include the dilutive impact of restricted stock units. Diluted shares also include the impact of eligible employee stock options, which are calculated based on the average share price for each fiscal period using the treasury stock method. As part of the adoption of ASU 2016-09 as of January 1, 2017, anticipated tax windfalls and shortfalls are no longer included in the calculation of assumed proceeds when applying the treasury stock method.

Derivatives
Derivatives
Derivatives
We utilize derivative financial instruments to hedge certain interest rate risks associated with our long-term debt, commodity price risks associated with forecasted future natural gas requirements and foreign exchange rate risks associated with transactions denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar. These derivatives, except for the foreign currency contracts and the natural gas contracts used in our Mexican manufacturing facilities, qualify for hedge accounting since the hedges are highly effective, and we have designated and documented contemporaneously the hedging relationships involving these derivative instruments. While we intend to continue to meet the conditions for hedge accounting, if hedges do not qualify as highly effective or if we do not believe that forecasted transactions would occur, the changes in the fair value of the derivatives used as hedges would be reflected in our earnings.
Fair Values

The following table provides the fair values of our derivative financial instruments for the periods presented:
 
 
Asset Derivatives:
(dollars in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Derivatives designated as hedging
instruments under FASB ASC 815:
 
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
 
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
Natural gas contracts
 
Prepaid and other current assets
 
$

 
Prepaid and other current assets
 
$
702

Natural gas contracts
 
Other assets
 

 
Other assets
 
45

Total designated
 
 
 

 
 
 
747

Derivatives not designated as hedging
instruments under FASB ASC 815:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Natural gas contracts
 
Prepaid and other current assets
 

 
Prepaid and other current assets
 
732

Natural gas contracts
 
Other assets
 

 
Other assets
 
29

Total undesignated
 
 
 

 
 
 
761

Total
 
 
 
$

 
 
 
$
1,508

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Liability Derivatives:
(dollars in thousands)
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Derivatives designated as hedging
instruments under FASB ASC 815:
 
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
 
Balance Sheet Location
 
Fair Value
Natural gas contracts
 
Derivative liability - current
 
$
100

 
Derivative liability - current
 
$

Natural gas contracts
 
Other long-term liabilities
 
19

 
Other long-term liabilities
 

Interest rate contract
 
Derivative liability - current
 
1,040

 
Derivative liability - current
 
1,928

Interest rate contract
 
Other long-term liabilities
 
353

 
Other long-term liabilities
 
107

Total designated
 
 
 
1,512

 
 
 
2,035

Derivatives not designated as hedging
instruments under FASB ASC 815:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Natural gas contracts
 
Derivative liability - current
 
38

 
Derivative liability - current
 

Natural gas contracts
 
Other long-term liabilities
 
20

 
Other long-term liabilities
 

Total undesignated
 
 
 
58

 
 
 

Total
 
 
 
$
1,570

 
 
 
$
2,035



Natural Gas Contracts

We use natural gas swap contracts related to forecasted future North American natural gas requirements. The objective of these commodity contracts is to limit the fluctuations in prices paid due to price movements in the underlying commodity. We consider our forecasted natural gas requirements in determining the quantity of natural gas to hedge. We combine the forecasts with historical observations to establish the percentage of forecast eligible to be hedged, typically ranging from 40 percent to 70 percent of our anticipated requirements, up to eighteen months in the future. The fair values of these instruments are determined from market quotes. As of June 30, 2017, we had commodity contracts for 2,350,000 million British Thermal Units (BTUs) of natural gas. At December 31, 2016, we had commodity contracts for 2,590,000 million BTUs of natural gas.

All of our derivatives for natural gas in the U.S. qualify and are designated as cash flow hedges at June 30, 2017. Hedge accounting is applied only when the derivative is deemed to be highly effective at offsetting changes in fair values or anticipated cash flows of the hedged item or transaction. For hedged forecasted transactions, hedge accounting is discontinued if the forecasted transaction is no longer probable to occur, and any previously deferred gains or losses would be recorded to earnings immediately. Changes in the effective portion of the fair value of these hedges are recorded in other comprehensive income (loss). The ineffective portion of the change in the fair value of a derivative designated as a cash flow hedge is recognized in other income (expense). As the natural gas contracts mature, the accumulated gains (losses) for the respective contracts are reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss to current expense in cost of sales in our Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations.

Since October 1, 2014, our derivatives for natural gas in Mexico have not been designated as cash flow hedges. All mark-to-market changes on these derivatives are reflected in other income (expense).

We (received) paid additional cash related to natural gas derivative settlements of $(0.2) million and $1.0 million in the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and $(0.3) million and $2.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, due to the difference between the fixed unit rate of our natural gas contracts and the variable unit rate of our natural gas cost from suppliers. Based on our current valuation, we estimate that accumulated losses for natural gas currently carried in accumulated other comprehensive loss that will be reclassified into earnings over the next twelve months will result in a $0.1 million loss in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

The following table provides a summary of the effective portion of derivative gain (loss) recognized in other comprehensive income (loss) from our natural gas contracts:
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Derivatives in Cash Flow Hedging relationships:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Natural gas contracts
 
$
(239
)
 
$
710

 
$
(709
)
 
$
94

Total
 
$
(239
)
 
$
710

 
$
(709
)
 
$
94



The following table provides a summary of the effective portion of derivative reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss to the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations from our natural gas contracts:
 
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Derivative:
Location:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Natural gas contracts
Cost of sales
 
$
90

 
$
(515
)
 
$
157

 
$
(1,055
)
Total impact on net income (loss)
 
 
$
90

 
$
(515
)
 
$
157

 
$
(1,055
)


The following table provides a summary of the gain (loss) recognized in other income (expense) in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations from our natural gas contracts in Mexico:
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Contracts where hedge accounting was not elected
 
$
(236
)
 
$
769

 
$
(819
)
 
$
1,139

Total
 
$
(236
)
 
$
769

 
$
(819
)
 
$
1,139



Interest Rate Swap

On April 1, 2015, we executed an interest rate swap on our Term Loan B as part of our risk management strategy to mitigate the risks involved with fluctuating interest rates. The interest rate swap effectively converts $220.0 million of our Term Loan B debt from a variable interest rate to a 4.85 percent fixed interest rate, thus reducing the impact of interest rate changes on future income. The fixed rate swap became effective in January 2016 and expires in January 2020. This interest rate swap is valued using the market standard methodology of netting the discounted expected future variable cash receipts and the discounted future fixed cash payments. The variable cash receipts are based on an expectation of future interest rates derived from observed market interest rate forward curves.

Our interest rate swap qualifies and is designated as a cash flow hedge at June 30, 2017 and accounted for under FASB ASC 815, "Derivatives and Hedging". Hedge accounting is applied only when the derivative is deemed to be highly effective at offsetting changes in fair values or anticipated cash flows of the hedged item or transaction. For hedged forecasted transactions, hedge accounting is discontinued if the forecasted transaction is no longer probable to occur, and any previously deferred gains or losses are recorded to earnings immediately. Changes in the effective portion of the fair value of these hedges are recorded in other comprehensive income (loss). The ineffective portion, if any, of the change in the fair value of a derivative designated as a cash flow hedge is recognized in other income (expense). Based on our current valuation, we estimate that accumulated losses currently carried in accumulated other comprehensive loss that will be reclassified into earnings over the next twelve months will result in $1.0 million of additional interest expense in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

The following table provides a summary of the effective portion of derivative gain (loss) recognized in other comprehensive income (loss) from our interest rate swap:
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Derivatives in Cash Flow Hedging relationships:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest rate swap
 
$
(619
)
 
$
(1,603
)
 
$
(415
)
 
$
(4,822
)
Total
 
$
(619
)
 
$
(1,603
)
 
$
(415
)
 
$
(4,822
)


The following table provides a summary of the effective portion of derivative reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income to the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations from our interest rate swap:
 
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Derivative:
Location:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest rate swap
Interest (expense)
 
$
(472
)
 
$
(620
)
 
$
(1,057
)
 
$
(1,011
)
Total impact on net income (loss)
 
 
$
(472
)
 
$
(620
)
 
$
(1,057
)
 
$
(1,011
)


Currency Contracts

Our foreign currency exposure arises from transactions denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar and is primarily associated with our Canadian dollar denominated accounts receivable. From time to time, we enter into a series of foreign currency contracts to sell Canadian dollars. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, we had no foreign currency contracts outstanding. The fair values of these instruments are determined from market quotes. The values of these derivatives will change over time as cash receipts and payments are made and as market conditions change.

Gains (losses) on currency derivatives that were not designated as hedging instruments are recorded in other income (expense) as follows:
 
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Derivative:
Location:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Currency contracts
Other income (expense)
 
$

 
$
31

 
$

 
$
(387
)
Total
 
 
$

 
$
31

 
$

 
$
(387
)


We do not believe we are exposed to more than a nominal amount of credit risk in our natural gas hedges, interest rate swap and currency contracts as the counterparties are established financial institutions. The counterparties for the derivative agreements are rated BBB+ or better as of June 30, 2017, by Standard and Poor’s.
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, is as follows:
Three months ended June 30, 2017
(dollars in thousands)
 
Foreign Currency Translation
 
Derivative Instruments
 
Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits
 
Accumulated Other
Comprehensive Loss
Balance March 31, 2017
 
$
(26,420
)
 
$
(350
)
 
$
(96,398
)
 
$
(123,168
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
5,589

 
(858
)
 
4,801

 
9,532

Currency impact
 

 

 
(258
)
 
(258
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Amortization of actuarial loss (1)
 

 

 
1,250

 
1,250

    Amortization of prior service cost (1)
 

 

 
(44
)
 
(44
)
    Cost of sales
 

 
(90
)
 

 
(90
)
    Interest expense
 

 
472

 

 
472

Current-period other comprehensive income (loss)
 
5,589

 
(476
)
 
5,749

 
10,862

Tax effect
 

 
(87
)
 
(2,755
)
 
(2,842
)
Balance on June 30, 2017
 
$
(20,831
)
 
$
(913
)
 
$
(93,404
)
 
$
(115,148
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six months ended June 30, 2017
(dollars in thousands)
 
Foreign Currency Translation
 
Derivative Instruments
 
Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits
 
Accumulated Other
Comprehensive Loss
Balance on December 31, 2016
 
$
(27,828
)
 
$
(515
)
 
$
(96,854
)
 
$
(125,197
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
6,997

 
(1,124
)
 
4,801

 
10,674

Currency impact
 

 

 
(738
)
 
(738
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Amortization of actuarial loss (1)
 

 

 
2,752

 
2,752

    Amortization of prior service cost (1)
 

 

 
(82
)
 
(82
)
    Cost of sales
 

 
(157
)
 

 
(157
)
    Interest expense
 

 
1,057

 

 
1,057

Current-period other comprehensive income (loss)
 
6,997

 
(224
)
 
6,733

 
13,506

Tax effect
 

 
(174
)
 
(3,283
)
 
(3,457
)
Balance on June 30, 2017
 
$
(20,831
)
 
$
(913
)
 
$
(93,404
)
 
$
(115,148
)

Three months ended June 30, 2016
(dollars in thousands)
 
Foreign Currency Translation
 
Derivative Instruments
 
Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits
 
Accumulated Other
Comprehensive Loss
Balance on March 31, 2016
 
$
(19,708
)
 
$
(3,718
)
 
$
(94,470
)
 
$
(117,896
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
(3,298
)
 
(893
)
 
2,755

 
(1,436
)
Currency impact
 

 

 
409

 
409

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Amortization of actuarial loss (1)
 

 

 
1,228

 
1,228

    Amortization of prior service cost (1)
 

 

 
48

 
48

    Cost of sales
 

 
515

 

 
515

    Interest Expense
 

 
620

 

 
620

Current-period other comprehensive income (loss)
 
(3,298
)
 
242

 
4,440

 
1,384

Tax effect
 
419

 
(85
)
 
(1,402
)
 
(1,068
)
Balance on June 30, 2016
 
$
(22,587
)
 
$
(3,561
)
 
$
(91,432
)
 
$
(117,580
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six months ended June 30, 2016
(dollars in thousands)
 
Foreign Currency Translation
 
Derivative Instruments
 
Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits
 
Accumulated Other
Comprehensive Loss
Balance on December 31, 2015
 
$
(22,913
)
 
$
(1,860
)
 
$
(95,459
)
 
$
(120,232
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
 
52

 
(4,728
)
 
2,755

 
(1,921
)
Currency impact
 

 

 
512

 
512

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Amortization of actuarial loss (1)
 

 

 
2,559

 
2,559

    Amortization of prior service cost (1)
 

 

 
95

 
95

    Cost of sales
 

 
1,055

 

 
1,055

    Interest Expense
 

 
1,011

 

 
1,011

Current-period other comprehensive income (loss)
 
52

 
(2,662
)
 
5,921

 
3,311

Tax effect
 
274

 
961

 
(1,894
)
 
(659
)
Balance on June 30, 2016
 
$
(22,587
)
 
$
(3,561
)
 
$
(91,432
)
 
$
(117,580
)
___________________________
(1) These accumulated other comprehensive income components are included in the computation of net periodic benefit cost within the cost of sales and selling, general and administrative expenses on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Segments
Segments
Segments

Our reporting segments align with our regionally focused organizational structure, which we believe enables us to better serve customers across the globe. Under this structure, we report financial results for U.S. and Canada; Latin America; Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA); and Other. Segment results are based primarily on the geographical destination of the sale. In the first quarter of 2017, net sales and related costs for certain countries were reclassified between segments to align with changes in business unit responsibilities. Accordingly, 2016 segment results have been reclassified to conform with the revised structure. The revised 2016 segment results do not affect any previously reported consolidated financial results. Our three reportable segments are defined below. Our operating segment that does not meet the criteria to be a reportable segment is disclosed as Other.

U.S. & Canada—includes sales of manufactured and sourced tableware having an end market destination in the U.S and Canada, excluding glass products for Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM), which remain in the Latin America segment.

Latin America—includes primarily sales of manufactured and sourced glass tableware having an end market destination in Latin America, including glass products for OEMs that have an end market destination outside of Latin America.

EMEA—includes primarily sales of manufactured and sourced glass tableware having an end market destination in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Other—includes primarily sales of manufactured and sourced glass tableware having an end market destination in Asia Pacific.

Our measure of profit for our reportable segments is Segment Earnings before Interest and Taxes (Segment EBIT) and excludes amounts related to certain items we consider not representative of ongoing operations as well as certain retained corporate costs and other allocations that are not considered by management when evaluating performance. As the gain (loss) on mark-to-market natural gas contracts is considered representative of our ongoing operations, it is included in Segment EBIT in 2017; the prior year derivative amount originally excluded from Segment EBIT in 2016 has been reclassified and included in Segment EBIT to conform to the current year presentation. We use Segment EBIT, along with net sales and selected cash flow information, to evaluate performance and to allocate resources. Segment EBIT for reportable segments includes an allocation of some corporate expenses based on the costs of services performed.

Certain activities not related to any particular reportable segment are reported within retained corporate costs. These costs include certain headquarter, administrative and facility costs, and other costs that are global in nature and are not allocable to the reporting segments.

The accounting policies of the reportable segments are the same as those described in note 2. We do not have any customers who represent 10 percent or more of total sales. Inter-segment sales are consummated at arm’s length and are reflected at end market reporting below.
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
(dollars in thousands)
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Net Sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
$
121,871

 
$
125,061

 
$
231,200

 
$
237,113

Latin America
36,503

 
40,619

 
67,225

 
74,822

EMEA
31,054

 
32,709

 
56,385

 
60,569

Other
8,086

 
9,513

 
15,698

 
18,205

Consolidated
$
197,514

 
$
207,902

 
$
370,508

 
$
390,709

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Segment EBIT:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
$
15,045

 
$
24,457

 
$
22,546

 
$
37,297

Latin America
1,907

 
8,570

 
(1,172
)
 
13,272

EMEA
(2,057
)
 
355

 
(2,894
)
 
(142
)
Other
(854
)
 
876

 
(2,069
)
 
1,326

Total Segment EBIT
$
14,041

 
$
34,258

 
$
16,411

 
$
51,753

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reconciliation of Segment EBIT to Net Income (Loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Segment EBIT
$
14,041

 
$
34,258

 
$
16,411

 
$
51,753

Retained corporate costs
(5,095
)
 
(7,050
)
 
(12,386
)
 
(13,774
)
Pension settlement

 
(212
)
 

 
(212
)
Reorganization charges
(2,488
)
 

 
(2,488
)
 

Product portfolio optimization

 
(6,784
)
 

 
(6,784
)
Executive terminations

 
328

 

 
(4,619
)
Interest expense
(5,138
)
 
(5,154
)
 
(10,005
)
 
(10,398
)
(Provision) benefit for income taxes
(2,152
)
 
(6,691
)
 
1,066

 
(6,553
)
Net income (loss)
$
(832
)
 
$
8,695

 
$
(7,402
)
 
$
9,413

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation & Amortization:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
$
3,084

 
$
3,379

 
$
6,166

 
$
6,835

Latin America
4,510

 
4,516

 
8,907

 
9,058

EMEA
1,848

 
3,617

 
3,692

 
5,775

Other
1,329

 
1,409

 
2,683

 
2,837

Corporate
457

 
433

 
935

 
930

Consolidated
$
11,228

 
$
13,354

 
$
22,383

 
$
25,435

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital Expenditures:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
$
2,457

 
$
2,154

 
$
4,394

 
$
5,993

Latin America
4,482

 
1,380

 
11,464

 
3,676

EMEA
7,633

 
889

 
10,396

 
3,107

Other
255

 
895

 
468

 
1,590

Corporate
269

 
338

 
326

 
1,145

Consolidated
$
15,096

 
$
5,656

 
$
27,048

 
$
15,511




Fair Value
Fair Value
Fair Value

Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The fair value hierarchy prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value into three broad levels as follows:

Level 1 — Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2 — Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or indirectly.
Level 3 — Unobservable inputs based on our own assumptions.

 
Fair Value at
 
Fair Value at
Asset / (Liability)
(dollars in thousands)
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Commodity futures natural gas contracts
$

 
$
(177
)
 
$

 
$
(177
)
 
$

 
$
1,508

 
$

 
$
1,508

Interest rate swap

 
(1,393
)
 

 
(1,393
)
 

 
(2,035
)
 

 
(2,035
)
Net derivative asset (liability)
$

 
$
(1,570
)
 
$

 
$
(1,570
)
 
$

 
$
(527
)
 
$

 
$
(527
)


The fair values of our commodity futures natural gas contracts are determined using observable market inputs. The fair value of our interest rate swap is based on the market standard methodology of netting the discounted expected future variable cash receipts and the discounted future fixed cash payments. The variable cash receipts are based on an expectation of future interest rates derived from observed market interest rate forward curves. Since these inputs are observable in active markets over the terms that the instruments are held, the derivatives are classified as Level 2 in the hierarchy. We also evaluate Company and counterparty risk in determining fair values. The commodity futures natural gas contracts and interest rate swap are hedges of either recorded assets or liabilities or anticipated transactions. Changes in values of the underlying hedged assets and liabilities or anticipated transactions are not reflected in the above table.
 
 
 
 
 

Financial instruments carried at cost on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, as well as the related fair values, are as follows:
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
(dollars in thousands)
 
Fair Value
Hierarchy Level
 
Carrying Amount
 
Fair Value
 
Carrying Amount
 
Fair Value
Term Loan B
 
Level 2
 
$
396,800

 
$
359,104

 
$
409,000